Francis Brown and William Noble honored in France, 1919.

The Song “Aloha Oe” is Heard in the Lands of France When Hawaiian Sons are Decorated with Honorary Medals.

[This is one of the articles from the page shown in the previous post, and you can see that the left column is mostly illegible. I can make out phrases like “the river Seine,” “gathered,” “American troops,” “General Petain,” “William K. Wells,” “Bwen,” “for their bravery,” “Noble of Honolulu”…]

…the cheeks of these boys, like what is customary of the French military; and that is when you immediately heard the song “Aloha Oe.”

And the crowd was awestruck as their fellow platoon members were watching attentively at what was being performed upon these Hawaiian boys.

And these Hawaiians became something great amongst their platoon, and then the band played French nationalistic songs.

These boys received much happiness, and so too did their families living here in Hawaii. Two youths, both native Hawaiians, they being Francis Brown and William Noble.

Hawaii is truly famous these days, and their great sea journey was worthwhile, they are still alive, received great honors, and made their parents and families happy.

And you, tiny Hawaii, amongst the great nations of the Earth, are elevated and made famous through the celebrated and fearless deeds of these Hawaiian boys.

(Aloha Aina, 3/28/1919, p. 1)

Lohe ia ka himeni Aloha oe ma na Kaiaulu o Farani ma ka Manawa i Hookau ia aku ai na kea Hoohanohano i Kekahi mau keiki Hawaii

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXXIV, Helu 12, Aoao 1. Maraki 28, 1919.

Why a lot of the pages need to be reshot (and probably unbound first). 2012.

[This is what many of the images of the papers look like. Why? Because they were bound like a book. Binding is both a blessing and a curse. Because they were bound, they are for the most part intact and complete, but on the other hand because they are bound, the side that is sewn will usually get cut off when taking a picture of the page. The binding in the image below is on the left-hand side. (Click on the image for a closer view.)

There can be no searching done when you can’t even make out the words. And as a result, a lot of knowledge is not accessible!]

Ke Aloha Aina, 3/28/1919, p. 1

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXXIV, Helu 12, Aoao 1. Maraki 28, 1919.