More on Hawaiians and the lowering of the flag, 1898.

WHO LOWERS THE FLAG?

Apparent Difference of Opinion Among Native Hawaiians.

Consultations Being Held—Preparations for Presenting Views Before the Commissioners.

The proposed Hawaiian political society spoken of in the Bulletin a few days ago has not yet completed all arrangements for organization but in a few days some definite action may be looked for.

The men at the head of the movement look upon it as most vital that a committee of representative Hawaiians be appointed to present the views of the Hawaiian people before the Commission that is soon to investigate matters in Hawaii preparatory to the framing of laws for her government.

Messrs. Ka-ne and Poepoe, two of the leaders in the movement referred to above, are at present consulting with various prominent Hawaiians on the matter of the lowering of the Hawaiian flag. They have agreed that it would be the correct thing to have a native born Hawaiian lower the flag for the last time, and they name Prince Albert Kunuiakea as the one, who should be selected to do this. Should he not consent, Judge Kalua is named as second choice. At any rate, the Government will be consulted in regard to the matter.

On the other hand there are natives who think that such a proceeding would be distinctly inappropriate and not at all in accordance with the feelings of the mass of native Hawaiians who would refuse point blank to take any part whatsoever in the lowering of the Hawaiian flag or raising of the American.

[This is one of the articles in the English newspapers of the day, on the subject of having a Hawaiian be the one to lower the flag.]

(Evening Bulletin, 8/5/1898, p. 1)

WHO LOWERS THE FLAG?

Evening Bulletin, Volume V, Number 982, Page 1. August 5, 1898.

Hawaiians and the lowering of the flag, 1898.

WILL THE ONE WHO LOWERS THE FLAG BE A HAWAIIAN?

There is much talk going around these days about this disturbing subject, that some native Hawaiians are being asked to carry out this deed when the time comes, that being the 12th of this month.

The kanaka Hawaii maoli who agrees to do this vile act, betraying the Beloved Flag of his homeland, should think carefully, and set his eyes upon the Beautiful Hawaiian Flag as the wafts of breeze softly unfurls the Hawaiian Flag upon its throne, that being top of the flag pole, before he rushes to carry out the traitorous orders of the cowards who are full of evil.

Let us leave to the American haole and the American descendants the carrying out of this act, so that the consequences fall on the haole and not on the Hawaiians.

Remember this: “It is not upon the chief priests of the Jews of those days past that befell the bitter end for their pushing Judas Iscariot to betray the Lord Jesus. But the horrible end fell upon Judas for that deed of the chief priests, and not upon them. It was Judas’ bowels that gushed out, and not that of the people who urged him on.

This will be the same, O Beloved Hawaiian people, and the haole is taking by force from you Beloved Hawaii.

Leave it to the haole to take down the Beloved Flag of Hawaii.

Edward Kekoa.

(Aloha Aina, 8/13/1893, p. 2)

HE KANAKA HAWAII ANA ANEI KA MEA NANA E HUKI KA HAE HAWAII ILALO

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 33, Aoao 2. Augate 13, 1898.

Two more days of performances left for Mai Poina: The Annexation Debate.

Hawai‘i Pono‘ī Coalition Presents:

MAI POINA: The Annexation Debate

In 1898, Hawai‘i was annexed by the United States in a most unorthodox and deeply controversial manner.

Citizens of both nations debated the issue then as well as today. Join us for an enlivening debate, ripped from the pages of Hawai‘i’s recent past.

February 23, 24, 25, & 26

All performances begin at 7 p.m., except for a 2 p.m. matinee on February 26.

Admission is free, though seating is limited in the Judiciary History Center courtroom in historic Ali‘iōlani Hale – directly ma kai of ‘Iolani Palace.

FOR RESERVATIONS, CALL 534-8880

Co-sponsored by the Center for Biographical Research and the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, as well as the Judiciary History Center.