Prohibition advertisement, 1910.

VOTE

“YES”

To Kick Out

—THE—

DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS,

—AND TO—

SAVE

HAWAII

(Kuokoa, 7/22/1910, p. 5)

E KOHO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Heu 29, Aoao 5. Iulai 22, 1910.

Princess Kaiulani returns home, 1897.

PRINCESS KAIULANI.

This past Tuesday, the 10th of Nov., with the arrival of the steamship Australia, the “Princess” Kaiulani, and her birth father [luaui makuakane], Hon. A. S. Cleghorn returned. Her attire carried the “alii” colors of Hawaii nei, that being the yellow of mamo feathers and the red [“pai-ula”] of the oo. Upon her head was a lei of carnation “poni-moi” [coronation]. She was in fine health, and has the stature of a well-educated lady.

Before the ship docked, the wharf was filled with people of all of the different lahui among us; the most however were Hawaiians. And when the ship came of to the dock, she was clearly seen, and some sobbed at her sight. This was not the body of Kaiulani eight years ago, but this was Kaiulani at twenty years old. When she left the shores of her land of birth, she was bight a child [“kama”] of 10 or 12 years of age, and she looked very much like the picture below:

THE YOUNG PRINCESS.

Her features and Her demeanor in the days of Her youth.

But upon this return, she is a woman that is a full-grown adult, and invested upon her are all the qualities of an adult. Among the words she gave to the people who met with her aboard the ship, she expressed her joy in stepping once again on the sands of her birth. She stood on the ship for almost a half an hour being detained by the many friends who hugged her. “Aloha—aloha to the alii,” are the words from the mouths of the kanaka maoli. Thereafter, she stepped of of the ship, accompanied by her birth father, along with Miss Eva Parker and the “Prince” David Kawananakoa, and she stepped into the car. While the car headed up from the dock, the sides of the street were filled with spectators who gave their aloha to her, and the “young Alii” nodded to each one on both sides of the road at the places which expressed their aloha.

She left for her home in Waikiki.

TIMES TO SEE THE YOUNG ALII.

The young “Alii” Kaiulani is at her residence in Ainahau, Waikiki. She will have audience with the Hawaiians on Saturdays from 10 in the morning until 4 in the afternoon; and the others on each day at the hours set aside. On this Wednesday, she went into the uplands to the Crypt of the “Alii” up in Nuuanu.

THE PRINCESS KAIULANI

This Picture is taken from a lime-light picture [? kii hoolele aka] taken of her in London, a few months ago.

[It is good to be wary of the loyalties of the newspaper (just as it is today) when reading coverage of events. The Kuokoa seems to be at this time pro-annexation and anti-monarchy. This is reflected in their use of quotation marks around words like “Princess” and “Alii”.]

(Kuokoa, 11/12/1897, p. 1)

KE KAMALIIWAHINE KAIULANI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVI, Helu 46, Aoao 1. Novemaba 12, 1897.

Two gifts in one, 2014.

Are you looking for the special gift for someone near or far? When you pick up calendars from the Hawaiian Historical Society, you are giving two gifts in one—a calendar for your loved one, and a donation to the Historical Society as well!

The Hawaiian Historical Society’s Hawaiian history calendar for 2015 is now available. The new calendar features historical photographs of outstanding sites in Hawaiʻi state parks on Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Maui, and Hawaiʻi Island. Many of the places that are now part of the park system have long attracted residents and visitors alike. The photographs chosen for the calendar exemplify the scenic beauty and unique natural features that have made these locales favored destinations for many decades.

Hawaiian Historical Society
Iao, one of the scenes from the 2015 calendar.

The photographs in the calendar were gleaned from the collections of the Hawaiian Historical Society, the Hawaiʻi State Archives, the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, the Kauaʻi Historical Society and the Hawaiian Mission Children’s Society Library. They date from the1860s through the late 1930s. image: January 2015 calendarAs always, the calendar’s pages are filled with notes about significant dates and interesting facts in Island history as well as the phases of the moon. They are great solutions for seasonal gift-giving quandaries.

Society members can purchase copies of the calendar for $8.00 each (plus $3.00 postage when mailed to you). The retail price is $10 per calendar. Bulk rates are available. The calendars can be obtained directly from the Hawaiian Historical Society office at 560 Kawaiahaʻo Street, Honolulu, HI 96813. Telephone (808) 537-6271. Look for them at the annual HHS open house and book sale December 11.

The 2015 Hawaiian history calendar is also available at the following book and gift shops: Native Books at Ward Warehouse; the Mission Houses Gift Shop; the Hawaii State Art Museum Gift Shop; and Kailua General Store.

For more information, see the Hawaiian Historical Society web page!