Response to hula commentary, 1891.

THE HULA AND THE “P. C. ADVERTISER.”

Another example of the “P. C. Advertiser’s” moral attitude appears int the announcement, that a hula given by the Hon. J. A. Cummins at his resident at Waimanalo was a glorious affair.—We have no doubt, that the display was exceptionally fine, since the ex-Premier has a well earned reputation as a connoiseur in that line, and is said to use the collection of females, formerly of boat house fame, second to none in the country.—Still there is something about the hula, that has so far excluded it from the programs of church festivals and school exercises.—It has never been recommended to lure the mind to thoughts of higher and better things or to produce rigid uprightness of morals.

The hula is a graceful and rhythmic representation of certain actions of the human animal. There is no doubt, that from the earliest ages the physiology of reproduction has been the most intrinsically interesting known to man. After the question of food and personal safety, it is the most important consideration in the lives of man, savage and civilized. The Hindoos and Budhists covered their temples and public buildings with indecent pictures, which in some instances took the form of a cross. This was imported to Rome together with the worship of Isis. So every spire on a Christian Church represents a resurrection of the flesh. But civilized society has decided for good reason to cover Isis with a vail and put Osiris in a straight-jacket. It is only those, who believe in the infallibility and prerogatives derived from gold—as some of our friends—who may wish to go back to the first principles and have the hula taught as an accomplishment in our public schools, so that it might prove more attractive in catching a husband and certainly in domesticating him when caught, than the art of piano playing or embroidery. There are great posibilities in the hula! But at present it is prohibited by the law, and we are sorry to see the law violated by those who ought to know better.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 5/14/1891, p. 4)

THE HULA AND THE "P. C. ADVERTISER."

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 193, Aoao 4. Mei 14, 1891.

Continuation of O. H. Gulicks letter from Japan, 1871.

LETTER FROM JAPAN.

(Continuation From Last Month.)

Ke Alauala:—Aloha oe:

There is a beautiful temple to Buddha on a hill inland of here. There are 125 nicely hewn stone steps leading to the grounds of the temple. There are fifty stone statues placed in pairs all about the temple, in small buildings. There are two in one structure, and two in the next, and two in the next, all around the great temple. The height of these stone figures are from one to four feet tall. Most are human figures, but there also some of foxes. One of the human statues was carved with ten hands, like the Buddha statues of India. There are two huge wooden statues maybe ten feet tall. It is said that these two huge figures possess mana. A person a piece of paper and chews it in his mouth until it is wadded up; then he spits it out, sticking it on to the body of the statue. According to the ignorant beliefs of the worshipers, the power of the statue comes out and enters the person. We saw paper that was chewed up and stuck to these two great statues; it looked like a case of rash from head to foot. Within the temple there are numerous metal lanterns and tiny bells, and coal burners and altars. Some of the metal objects are beautifully decorated in gold. There are some metal plates with perhaps the names of the gods and names of ancestors and perhaps prayers that were composed written upon them. All of the decorations within this Buddhist temple are very fine and beautiful. As for the priests caring for the Buddhist temple, their heads are shaved bald.

The second religion is totally different, that being Shinto. The Ruler of Japan is the head of this religion; he is called the Mikado, the child of God, the child of the Heavens.

Earlier, American and British diplomats were talking to those from Japan, and said that the teaching to their people of Christianity should be allowed. The Japanese diplomats said that the Ruler of Japan, the Mikado, was the son of God,  and therefore, it isn’t right to teach Christianity, for in that religion, it is said that Jesus Christ is the son of God. If Christianity is allowed amongst the Japanese people, then one son of God would end up opposing another. There should not be two sons of God in one nation, lest they fight each other. So the teaching of Christianity to the Japanese is strictly prohibited. The people fear the rulers, and do not associate with the Christian missionaries.

According to the words of David in Psalms 2: The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord, and against his anointed. However, I am hopeful that in no time, the doors will open and the words of God will enter far and wide in this land.

In the city of Kobe, there is a deserted forest, and within it is a Shinto shrine; there is not carved god in the shrine of this religion, except a fox statue, a type of wild dog. There are hundreds of large lanterns on the grounds of this shrine, lanterns carved out of stone, and some metal ones as well. White horses are kept on the grounds of  Shinto shrines. These small white horses are always kept, and they are fed all the time. Perhaps these horses are gods; spirits perhaps live within the horses. Within the shrine, there are numerous beautiful things made of brass and gold.

How misguided are those who do not hear the word of God. When we learn the language of this land, we will teach them about Jehovah, the true God.

Much aloha to all the people of my homeland who are reading the Alaula. It is of them who i dreamt of some nights ago.  From me, O. H. Gulick.

Kobe, Japan, March 18, 1871.

(Alaula, 6/1871, p. 10)

PALAPALA MAI IAPANA MAI.

Ke Alaula, Buke VI, Helu 3, Aoao 10. Iune, 1871.

Hawaii missionaries in Japan, 1871.

LETTER FROM JAPAN.

Ke Alaula:—Aloha to you:—Here we are on the shores of the island called Nipona,* the large island of the archipelago of Japan. We left San Francisco on the first day of February and on the 26th, we landed here at Yokohama, Japan. We stayed there for three days and met with the American missionaries who live there. Then we boarded a steam coaster and travelled for two nights and landed at the port of Kōbe. Kōbe is on the south side of Nipona, in the space between Nipona and Kyūshū.

The two of us spent two weeks with the American missionary who arrived here earlier. Currently we are renting a house, and perhaps this is where we will stay permanently. There are about 300 haole from abroad living here, but most of them are unbelievers.

We started to learn Japanese, and know some words. Here are some of them, ino [imo] is potato; kome is rice; maki is firewood; tora [tori] is chicken; hiru go hau [hiru gohan] is lunch.

The Rulers and all people of the land are idol worshipers. There are perhaps forty people who have followed after the teachings of the American missionaries, listening to and worshiping Jehovah. There are maybe twenty million or more people in total in this land.

There are two types of idolatry here. The first one is Buddhism. This religion was spread from India until it reached Japan. The second type is called Sinetu [Shintō]. The religious buildings for both of these religions are built in serene places on hills, in beautiful valleys and sheltered forests.

O. H. Gulick.

*This seems to be a misunderstanding, whereas “Nippon” is the name for Japan as a whole, and the island that Gulick speaks of is named Honshū.

(Alaula, 5/1871, p. 8)

PALAPALA MAI IAPANA MAI.

Ke Alaula, Buke VI, Helu 2, Aoao 8. Mei, 1871.