Mrs. Mileka Rose Silva passes on, 1922.

GREATEST OF ALL IS ALOHA, IT CANNOT BE DROWNED BY GREAT FLOODS.

MRS. MILEKA ROSE SILVA

Mr. Editor of the Newspaper Kuokoa; Much aloha to you:—Please extend your patience with this sad parcel we are sending, and allow it some open space in the Nupepa Kuokoa, should there be space, so that the family and friends of the one who left this life can know of it, from Hawaii, the island of Keawe, to Kauai of Mano with its twinned lei of mokihana.

At 2 a. m., on Monday, June 19, A. D. 1922, the angel of peace came and took the life spirit from the beloved body of Mrs. Mileka Rose Silva, at our beloved home at Number 1033 Wolters Lane, Kapalama, Honolulu, and left her spiritless remains for us, the ohana, with sadness in love, for our beloved who left this life.

Her body remained at our home until 3 p. m., Tuesday the 20th, and the Rev. Samuel K. Kaloa held a service at the home, as well as where her remains were laid to rest at the Cemetery of Pue’a. Continue reading

Hula and King Kalakaua’s 50th Jubilee, 1886.

THE LUAU FEAST AT THE PALACE GROUNDS.

Nov. 23, 1886.

After 3 o’clock in the afternoon of this Tuesday, the King, the Princes and Princesses, the dignitaries, and the makaainana sat at a long table housed by a pavilion with corrugated iron roofing [lanai pili hao], which could sit an estimated 600 to 900 people at a time. There was much Hawaiian foods supplied, like laulau [puaa hoolua] and roasted pork [puaa kalua kele]; fish wrapped in ti leaves and baked [lawalu] and raw [ai-maka]; baked beef [i’o pipi hoolua] and all types of poi spoken of.

The Governor of the “bays of Piilani”¹ as well as his government officials and Delegates, along with those of the island of Keawe.² These people sat along with their pastor, M. Makalua. They began eating after the prayer was over. The entourage of the King and Queen arrived and sat in their area, and they had their own pastor, J. Waiamau. Therefore, Maui was victorious over their hunger [?? Nolaila, ua eo no ia Maui ma ka houpo lewalewa].

The eating continued perhaps until 5 o’clock. A big problem was the dearth of waiters for the grand feast that was boasted about. Thanks to the small children of Kahehuna [School], there were those to serve the food for the feast.

HAWAIIAN HULA.

From 7 o’clock in the night, Hawaiian hula of five types commenced, that being olapa, kui, uli-uli, pa-ipu, kaka laau, and hula pahu.

When those of Waikiki kai danced their hula kui, the audience complained, and that hula was put to an end without ending properly.

During that joyful night, some youths were seen attempting to get the dancers to kiss their cheeks, and to [?? hoolele na ala] without any sign of shame.

We were deafened by all the improper talk of some of the things seen in that partying crowd that we will not agree to tell the nation.

¹The governor of Maui was John Owen Dominis.

²The governor of Hawaii was Virginia Kapooloku Poomaikelani

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 11/27/1886, p. 4)

KA AHAAINA LUAU MA KA PA ALII.

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IX, Helu 48, Aoao 4. Novemaba 27, 1886.