Thoughts for the upcoming Kamehameha Day, 1920.

THEY ARE TRUE HAWAIIANS BUT THEY CANNOT SING HAWAIIAN SONGS.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Maybe at 3 o’clock or so in the morning of Friday, June 11, 1920, that being the birthday of the Nation Conqueror Kamehameha, there came to my home some singing boys, and this was something; it was a familiar thing where on holidays this and that person came around singing at houses lived in by Hawaiians.

Before the singers came, I got the idea that since these singers were coming to my home, I would get up and listen to the singing outside on the lanai like I was accustomed to in past years; it was not long before I heard strains of a guitar, and the singing started, but it was from my bedroom that I was listening. Continue reading

Mrs. Mileka Rose Silva passes on, 1922.

GREATEST OF ALL IS ALOHA, IT CANNOT BE DROWNED BY GREAT FLOODS.

MRS. MILEKA ROSE SILVA

Mr. Editor of the Newspaper Kuokoa; Much aloha to you:—Please extend your patience with this sad parcel we are sending, and allow it some open space in the Nupepa Kuokoa, should there be space, so that the family and friends of the one who left this life can know of it, from Hawaii, the island of Keawe, to Kauai of Mano with its twinned lei of mokihana.

At 2 a. m., on Monday, June 19, A. D. 1922, the angel of peace came and took the life spirit from the beloved body of Mrs. Mileka Rose Silva, at our beloved home at Number 1033 Wolters Lane, Kapalama, Honolulu, and left her spiritless remains for us, the ohana, with sadness in love, for our beloved who left this life.

Her body remained at our home until 3 p. m., Tuesday the 20th, and the Rev. Samuel K. Kaloa held a service at the home, as well as where her remains were laid to rest at the Cemetery of Pue’a. Continue reading

More on William K. Kaleihuia. 1933.

WILLIAM K. KALEIHUIA HAS MADE 73 YEARS OLD.

On Friday, the 17th of February past, William K. Kaleihuia of this town made 73 years old.

He was born at Papahawahawa, Makawao, Maui, on the 17th of February, 1860, from the loins of Kawohionalani Kuahine and Kaaeainamoku, his father.

God has much aloha in having extended the days of the life of this man.

[Would anyone have more information on this man?]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 3/2/1933, p. 2)

PIHA IA WILLIAM K. KALEIHUIA NA MAKAHIKI HE 73.

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 5, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Maraki 2, 1933.

On the state of the Hawaiian Language, 1920.

PERTAINING TO THE HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE.

Mr. Editor of the Nupepa Kuokoa, Aloha oe:—In the Kuokoa of Friday, May 21, 1920, I saw your thoughts supporting Mr. Coelho on the Hawaiian Language, and about the lack of use of the Hawaiian language in some churches and Hawaiian organizations when they meet; English is what is spoken in meetings; not because Hawaiian is not understood, but because of their great embarrassment in speaking Hawaiian; there is English and it is attractive to speak, yet all the while they understand that it is not appropriate at all to be speaking in English.

It isn’t in some churches and Hawaiian associations that it is not spoken, but in markets, on streets, in homes in which true Hawaiians live, and all around this island of Oahu, only a very tiny fraction of true Hawaiians speak the Hawaiian language; most of the men, women, and children, all they speak is English.

It is not something that I’ve heard from a friend; no, I have seen it with my own eyes, and heard it with my own ears; a Hawaiian father and a Hawaiian mother, and children born of their loins, born here in Hawaii, yet the strange thing is that the language they speak is English, and not Hawaiian.

Who are the true Hawaiians that are snuffing out the Hawaiian language? The ones that are too haughty and the ones who are too ashamed to speak in Hawaiian, like with some churches and some Hawaiian organizations that don’t want to speak Hawaiian when they meet.

I do not oppose the speaking of English or other languages perhaps that we true Hawaiians know; it is a great benefit that we can converse in those languages, but the problem is that we’ve abandoned the Hawaiian language.

How can we Hawaiians say that we defend dearly [makee] the Hawaiian lahui from dying off and from coming into great difficulties if we do not cherish our mother tongue? Continue reading