Strange fish in Honomalino, South Kona, 1865.

Fish that Washed Ashore.

On the 26th of December, a very strange fish washed ashore at Honomalino, South Kona, Hawaii, and was found by a little girl. The length of this fish was 18 inches, and the width was 9 inches. When cut square, it looked flat. Some people have said that the name of the fish is Hoana. Its mouth is like that of a humuhumu. Its eyes, and dorsal fin, and gill plate look like that of an Ahi or and Aku, and it was eaten up by Mahoe. Three more of the very same type of fish came up at another place in Hoopuloa. How wonderful is God’s work.

S. W. Papaula.

Napoopoo, Kona, Hawaii, Jan. 30, 1864.

(Kuokoa, 2/2/1865, p. 3)

I-a Pae.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 5, Aoao 3. Feberuari 2, 1865.

Another “Memoirs of Obookiah” translation, 1867.

Book of the Moolelo of Heneri Opukahaia.

We are printing below the first pages of and the Table of Contents of the Chapters of the story of this Hawaiian that was educated in America. In this book is seven chapters, and it is almost a hundred pages. It is being printed in America and it will be here in a few more months.

THE STORY OF HENERI OPUKAHAIA—Born in Hawaii, A. D. 1787, and Died in America, February 17, 1818—The First Fruit of Hawaii nei. Printed by the American Tract Society [Amerika Ahahui Teraka], New York, 1867.

INTRODUCTION.

The majority of this Moolelo was translated from a book published in English in the United States of America. However, information was researched, and some of the errors of the book was corrected. Some things were added from the moolelo that Rev. S. W. Papalua investigated at Kealakeakua, Hawaii.

This story of Heneri Opukahaia is something important to us Hawaiians; for this is the first of the miracles that God performed benevolently upon our People; and through this start, the enlightenment, the knowledge, and the righteousness of Hawaii has increased until this day.

Should this moolelo become something which increases our love for God and our glorification of Jehovah, that will be enough…

[A couple of years later in 1867, the original translation was appended to and corrected with the information collected by that same S. W. Papaula of Napoopoo, and published in book form under the title: “KA MOOLELO O HENERI OPUKAHAIA, UA HANAUIA MA HAWAII, M. H. 1787, A UA MAKE MA AMERIKA, FEBERUARI 17, 1818. OIA KA HUA MUA O HAWAII NEI.”]

(Kuokoa, 5/18/1867, p. 3)

Buke Moolelo o Heneri Opukahaia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 20, Aoao 3. Mei 18, 1867.

More on Opukahaia, 1865.

The Story of Opukahaia.

Keau was the father, Kamohoula was the mother. From the two was born this child, Opukahaia, along with another younger child (the name of that child is not known). Opukahaia was born soon before the battle between Kamehameha and Namakeha at Kau. And at Kau in Ninole, is where Opukahaia was born. He was named for the slitting of the stomach of a certain alii, and that is why he was called Opukahaia [“the cutting of the stomach”].

When the time of warfare between Kamehameha and Namakeha arrived, the parents of Opukahaia were killed. When his parents were killed, Opukahaia fled Kau, and went to Kohala.

While he lived in Kohala, Opukahaia was found by Pahua, the brother of his mother, and he was returned here to Kona, and lived with Puhua them and Hina them here in Napoopoo, South Kona, Hawaii.

The time when Opukahaia was living here in Napoopoo, when he was brought back from Kohala, he was an adult at the time. While he lived here, to him belonged the occupation of the kahuna of the olden days. Opukahaia was obedient; he was however not a farmer nor a fisherman, for he was not taught much about those things. He really just wanted to be taught kahuna things, and this was something that he was very interested in doing constantly, on sacred nights of Prayer [? Hainapule]. The one who taught him the ways of the kahuna was Pahua. He was a skilled kahuna taught by Hewahewa, the Great Kahuna of the Heiau of Hikiau.

After Opukahaia received the knowledge of the occupation of the kahuna, he constructed his stone Heiau within Helehelekalani, and he built a house atop his heiau, while he worshiped three gods. 1. Lono, 2. Kukaohiakala, 3. Kukailimoku.

He was constantly honing his skills, until he left for America.

When the American trading ship appeared here at Kealakekua, he was prodded by a haole aboard the ship, named Mika Alani, who was an aikane of Hewahewa; and so he went and left the work that he was trained in.

And at this Heiau which he built, he planted three coconuts, and they are growing and fruiting. The cave [? pao] of this boy, Opukahaia, can be seen by those who visit here. His relative still lives here in South Kona, her name is Hina; she is gray-haired and is frail now.

This is a short story of what is heard of Opukahaia. With mahalo.

S. W. Papaula.

Napoopoo, S. Kona, Oct. 10, 1865.

[This seems to be written in response to the translation being published in Kuokoa at the same period. Papaula is adding to the information given in the translation. This ability to quickly add to or correct information published in the newspapers was one of the many advantages newspapers had over books.]

(Kuokoa, 11/4/1865, p. 4)

Moolelo no Opukahaia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 44, Aoao 4. Novemaba 4, 1865.

Biography of Henry Opukahaia, 1865–1866.

Here is one of a number of times where the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers run the biography of Heneri Opukahaia. This is a translation of the book, “MEMOIR OF HENRY OBOOKIAH, A NATIVE OF THE SANDWICH ISLANDS, WHO DIED AT CORNWALL, CONNECTICUT, FEBRUARY 17, 1818, AGED 26.” by Rev. E. W. Dwight. The story runs in the Kuokoa from 9/9/1865 until 3/24/1866.

This is not the same text as the book published later in Hawaiian in 1867 in New York: “KA MOOLELO O HENERI OPUKAHAIA, UA HANAUIA MA HAWAII, M. H. 1787, A UA MAKE MA AMERIKA, FEBERUARI 17, 1818. OIA KA HUA MUA O HAWAII NEI.” The published book is based on the same English story, but is edited for errors, and includes further information gathered by Rev. S. W. Papaula in Kealakekua. That being said, most books in Hawaiian were first printed as a serial in the newspapers first, and then published as a book.

It opens this way:

The Story of Henry
Opukahaia

NUMBER 1.

HIS STORY PRIOR TO HIS
ARRIVAL IN AMERICA.

Heneri Opukahaia is from Hawaii, the famous and densely populated island of the Hawaiian Archipelago. He was born in the year 1792. His parents were makaainana, however, his mother was connected to chiefly circles. Her name was Kumuola, and the name of his father is not known. When Opukahaia reached the age of perhaps ten or twelve, his parents were killed before his eyes. There were but two in his family that survived, he and his youngest sibling who was three months old. He hoped to save his young sibling from the tragedy which befell upon his parents, so he grabbed his little sibling and placed it upon his back and ran from the enemy; however, he was found by those chasing after them, and the younger sibling was cruelly killed. That telling of that account is written in another book according to what was told by Opukahaia…

[If you are in or around Hilo this Monday, consider checking out the talk by Deborah Liʻikapeka Lee on Opukahaia at the Lyman Museum. For more information see the Lyman Museum page.]

(Kuokoa, 9/9/1865, p. 2)

Ka Moolelo o Heneri Opukahaia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 36, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 9, 1865.