List of leprosy patients sent to Molokai, 1868.

Concerning the Leprosy Patients on Molokai.

O Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:

I have seen in Issue 10 of March 7 and Issue 11 of the 14th, the question as to how many leprosy patients were brought to Waikolu, here in Molokai. If it pleases you, I will tell you the total number of patients brought to Molokai, along with the deaths, and those who were released, and also those patients who are still living; and also the difficulties they faced in the years 1866–1867. Here below is a list of the patients from the month of January, 1866–1867. The list is given by the boats that brought the patients, from the first boat to the last. And also, an italic “m” placed [after] the name signifies that they are deceased [“make”], and an “h” placed [after] the name signifies they were released [“hookuuia”], and an “o” placed [after] the name means they are still living here [“ola”].
I would like to speak of their difficulties during this past year. And this is it; the patients were beset with much difficulties, and that they had no food, and that is the reason that so many patients died. There is but one abundant thing to eat: peas, ape, ti-leaf root 4, and green bananas boiled up in a pot until cooked, and that is what they eat to get by; and that goes on everyday, and that is why many of the patients die. Another big problem of the patients is the consumption of the spoiled beef mixed with tar and plaster that is sent by the board of health as food for the patients. Another big problem faced by the patients is the extreme cold; it is not beneficial for the sick to live here.
There are so many other things, but I believe that I will talk about them to you later, should you deem it proper.
Here is the lists of the patients.
Boat 1, January 6, 1866.
J. L. Noa k [kane], m. July 20 [not sure what these dates are], Pauoa, H. Oahu,
Kini k, o. ” ” “
J. D. Kahalauliko k, o. July 20, Kapalama, Oahu,
Waipio k, m. Aug. 8, Kalihi-uka, Oahu,
Liilii k, o. ” ” “
Kainaina k, m. Nov. 28, Makiki, Oahu,
Kaaumoana k, o. ” Waihee, Maui,
Puha k, m. Jan. 1868, Honolulu, Oahu,
Lono k, m. Jan. 1, 1867, Manoa, Oahu,
Kapihe w [wahine], o. ” ” Honolulu, Oahu,
Laakapu w, o. ” ” Kalihiuka, Oahu,
Nahuina w, m. Aug. 5, 1866, Moanalua, O.
Total – – 12.
Boat 2, January 31, 1866.
Paakiki k, o. Jan. 31, 1866, Wailuku, Maui,
Kimo 1 [“1” indicates that there were more than one person with the same name] k, o. ” ” Manoa, Oahu,
Kaunele k, o. ” ” Moanalua, O.
Kaili 1 k, m. Oct. 22, 1866, Honolulu, O.
Kaulahea k, o. ” ” Kapalama, O.
Iosewe k, o. ” ” Honolulu, O.
Kamai k, o. ” ” Kapalama, O.
Kahuhu k, o. ” ” Keoneula, O.
Kuapuu w, o. ” ” Puiwa, H. O.
Pahu w, o. ” ” Honolulu, Oahu,
Kaiokaluni w, o. ” ” ” “
Mahoe w, o. ” ” Kewalo, H. O.
Total – – 12.
Boat 3, February 9, 1866.
Sema k, o. Feb. 9, 1866, Puiwa, N. H. O,
Kolikoli k, o. ” ” Waialua, Oahu,
Pauaka k, h. ” ” Kalihi-uka, Oahu.
Keawe 1 k, h. ” ” Honolulu, Oahu,
Aalona k, m. Feb. 20, 1867, Honolulu, Oahu,
Kaanaana k, m. Apr. 15, 1866, Heeia, K. O.
Ilei k, m. October 4, 1867, Kaneohe, Oahu,
Kahoohanohano w, o. Oct. 4, 1867, Makiki,
Total – – 8.
Boat 4, Feberuary 19, 1866.
D. W. Puhaula k, o. Feb. 19, 1868, Hilo, H.
Kawahakai k, m. May 31, 1866, H. Ewa, O.
Kaaua k, o. ” ” Pauoa, H. O.
Kaiki k, o. ” ” Kaanapali, M.
Kaili 2 k, h. ” ” Kalae, Molo.
Keahololio k, o. ” ” ” “
Kaluhilani k, o. ” ” Honolulu, O.
Kauhiahiwa k, o. ” ” Puiwa, H. O.
Kanakaole k, o. ” ” Kailua, Koo.
Kapa k, o. ” ” Waialua, O.
Kane 1 k, o. ” ” Waimanalo,
Paiaina k, o. ” ” Honolulu, O.
Mulehu w, o. ” ” Waialua, O.
Kekalohe w, h. ” ” Ewa, Oahu,
Kikilehua w, h. ” ” Kewalo, O.
Total – – 15.
Boat 5, March 25, 1866.
Palapala k, o. Mar. 25, 1866, Waialua, O.
Kamaka 1 k, o. ” ” Lihue, W. O.
Auhea k, o. ” ” Kaneohe, K. O.
Kainaina w, o. ” ” Kailua, K. O.
Total – – 4.
Boat 6, April 13, 1866.
Kahulanui k, m. Mar. 16, 1867. Lahaina, M.
Kahoohanohano k, m. Feb. 29, 1868, Kona, H.
Kane 2 k, o. Feb. 29, 1868, Lahaina, Maui,
Mataio k, m. May 4, 1866, Lahaina, Maui,
Total – – 4.
Boat 7, April 27, 1866.
Koalakai k, m. Aug. 6, 1866, Lahaina, M.
Kaia k, m. July 16, 1866, Lahaina, Maui,
Makaebe k, m. July 4, 1866, Lahaina, Mau.
Kanakalo k, o. ” ” Waianae, O.
Kaneakua k, m. May 30, 1866, Lahaina, M.
Nui k, o. ” ” ” “
Kauahaao w, m. Mar. 22, 1867, Lahaina, M.
Malata w, m. Nov. 27, 1867, Waianae, O.
Total – – 8
Boat 8, May 3, 1866.
Kameo k, o. May 3, 1866, Kaneohe, Koolau,
Kila k, o. ” ” ” “
Kaahu k, m. July 23, 1867, Ewa, Oahu.
Kaupena k, m. May 23, 1866, Lahaina, M.
Napua k, o. ” ” Honolulu, O.
Kaonohi w, o. ” ” Lahaina, M.
Kauwe w, o. ” ” ” “
Kaaipuaa w, m. Nov. 1, 1866, Moiliili, W.
Kaluahine w, m. Dec. 4, 1867, Lahaina, M.
Papaka w, m. June 27, 1866, Lahaina, M.
Pahia w, o. ” ” ” “
Manaole K. w, h. ” ” ” “
Total – – 12.
Boat 9, June 10, 1866.
J. Kalua k, o. June 10, 1866, Waihee, M.
Kalaluhi k, o. ” ” Kona, Hawaii,
Keawe 2 k, o. ” ” Puna, Hawaii,
Ioane k, o. ” ” Kaneohe, Koo.
Kepilina k, m. Aug. 19, 1867, Kaluahole, O.
Kaolelo k, m. June 12, 1866, Maliko, H. M.
Waiwaiole k., died at sea, June 7, 1866, Kula, Maui,
Kauloa w, o. June 7, 1866, Waihee, Maui,
Ana w, o. ” ” ” “
Kea w, m. Nov. 19, 1866, Maliko, Maui,
Kaulana w, o. ” ” Hamakualoa, M.
Total – – 11.
Boat 10, July 1, 1866.
J. H. Hao k, o. July 1, 1866, Waialua, O.
Noa k, o. ” ” Hauula, O.
Mailou k, o. ” ” Kahakuloa, M.
Muolo k, o. ” ” Kalepolepo, M.
Naehu k, o. ” ” Keanae, K. M.
L. Wahahee k, o. ” ” Puunui, H. O.
Kapena w, o. ” ” Honolulu, O.
Elikapeka w, o. ” ” Hauhaukoi, O.
Salai w, m. Oct. 15, 1866, Lahaina, Maui,
Moopuna w, o. ” ” Honuaula, M.
Kaluaioahu w, m. Feb. 14, 1867, Koolau, M.
Napela w, o. ” ” Lahaina,
Total – – 12.
(Not complete.)
[Anyone have an idea what the dates in the list stand for? And also the description here is interesting when compared to what was said in this morning’s newspaper: “Translations bring to light true voices of patients,” by Dan Nakaso.]
(Kuokoa, 5/9/1868, p. 4)
No na mai Lepera ma Molokai.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 19, Aoao 4. Mei 9, 1868.

Response to Ernest A. Mott-Smith’s Letter in San Francisco Call, 1912.

THE STATE OF LEPROSY IN HAWAII NEI

In the newspaper, the “Call” of San Francisco, of the 14th of August, in a section of that newspaper dealing with Hawaii, is where we saw a very important idea given by Mott-Smith, the secretary of the Territory of Hawaii, describing matters related to Leprosy in Hawaii nei. We understand the thoughts of Mr. Mott-Smith that Leprosy isn’t a contagious disease like what was believed long ago; it is only weakly transmitted. In other words, “Leprosy” is not transmittable from one person to another.

[The article referred to here from the San Francisco Call, “ON GUARD AGAINST DISEASE,” can be found here at Chronicling America.

Also, i could barely read the Aloha Aina article, because the image online is so unclear, as you can see for yourself. There are so many pages like this that need to be shot clearly before it is too late…]

(Aloha Aina, 9/14/1912, p. 1)

KE KULANA MA'I LEPERA MA HAWAII NEI

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 37, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 14, 1912.