The beginnings of Punahou School, 1841.

SCHOOLHOUSE FOR THE MISSIONARIES, AT KA PUNAHOU.

The rooms are explained by the numbers,

1, a library; 2, 3, 4, 5, for the teachers; 6, kitchen; 7, 8, 9, 10, for the students; 11, 12, for Mi. Mika [?] the woman helper; 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, for the students; 18, cafeteria; 19, school room; 20, room for entertaining guests; 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 for the students. A, E, wide areas to play.

This will not be completed quickly at this time; the places with solid lines are being constructed, and the areas surrounded by dashes are left to complete at a later date. The most tiny rooms are solitary rooms.

[Earlier, i posted a diagram of the layout of the Chiefs’ Children’s School. Here from about the same time is the school for missionary children at Kapunahou, the precursor to today’s Punahou School.

The school began instruction on July 11, 1842, with 5 boarders and 12 day schoolers.]

(Nonanona, 11/23/1841, p. 44)

KA HALE KULA NO NA MISIONARI, AIA MA KA PUNAHOU.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 1, Pepa 11, Aoao 44. Novemaba 23, 1841.

The name of Kaumualii’s mahiole, 1906.

[Excerpt from: “He Moolelo no Kamehameha I. Ka Na’i Aupuni Hawaii.” by Hooulumahiehie.]

After these words of Kamehameha’s were over, he then took his mahiole, Koki, from a basket and placed it upon the head of Kaumualii. Kamehameha removed his royal malo and so too did Kaumualii remove his malo, and they exchanged them with each other.

[This account is from the meeting of Kamehameha and Kaumualii. It is just a tiny excerpt of the kind of awesome information available in the story of Kamehameha I translated by Kamaoli Kuwada, Emalani Case, and Beau Bassett, slated to come out from Kamehameha Publishing. I can’t wait.

I was informed that this priceless feathered object from the past is indeed being cared for amongst the many other antiquities at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum.]

(Na’i Aupuni, 9/14/1906, p. 1)

HE MOOLELO NO KAMEHAMEHA I.

Ka Na’i Aupuni, Buke II, Helu 88, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 14, 1906.