Decoration Day, 1909.

“DAY TO STREW FLOWERS”

As has been the custom in previous years, that is the observation of memorial day [la lupua], the town is similarly decorating the graves of their loved ones with flowers of every type, and the cemeteries of the many who have passed are truly beautiful to see.

The 30th of May has been taken as a day to “strew flowers,” being that it is the month in which many flowers are seen, and also it is the final day the soldiers served as soldiers in the great war [kaua huliamahi].

The number of the [national] cemeteries in the different States of the United States, for the soldiers who sacrificed their lives for their land, is about seventy-seven, and within them they hold about four-hundred fifty thousand bodies. It is for them that the day is set aside; it is a time for the living to show their loving remembrances for those who bore suffering for the welfare of the people who enjoy the rights and blessings for which they sought after.

In the year 1882, the parades and speeches for those who died on the battlefields were initiated, and that is what happened this past Monday by the soldiers of this town.

Taking the words of General John B. Gordon, “It is impossible for us who are today joyful, to deny the truth of these things, that being, those who are living should be as true brothers of those people who suffered injuries for the blessings of this land. They stood and fought for the righteousness of the law and for independence, and that is how this generation then should remain and defend the very same right, continually pushing America on higher in all areas of progress.”

(Kuokoa, 6/9/1909, p. 4)

KA LA LUPUA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 23, Aoao 4. Iune 9, 1909.

Kamehameha boys off to war, 1917.

Hawaii Young Men Who Have Enlisted in Navy and Will Go to Coast

Here are two youths of this city who have enlisted in the U. S. navy on board the U. S. S. Alert. On the left is Jerome Fearoi, 19 years old, a freshman student at Kamehameha School for Boys. On the right is George Woolsey, also 19, born in Honolulu, and also of the freshman class at Kamehameha, where he took the machine-shop course.

These two young men, having joined the U. S. colors, are to be ordered to the Naval Training Station at San Francisco, Cal., for a military training prior to being assigned to duty on board a war vessel.

The naval authorities here are securing enlistments in accordance with the recent notification by Secretary Daniels. Applicants for enlistment may apply at the Alert, Navajo, Naval Station in Honolulu or recruiting office at the O. R. & L. depot every morning. The hours are as follows:

Naval Station, Honolulu, between 2 p. m. and 4:30 p. m., week days, and 9 a. m. to 11:30 a. m., Sundays. U. S. S. Alert, 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. U. S. S. Navajo, 7 a. m. to 4 p. m., or at the railroad station between 6:45 a. m. and 7:25 a. m. each morning except Sunday.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 4/17/1917, p. 9)

Hawaii Young Men Who Have Enlisted in Navy and Will Go to Coast

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXIV, Number 7803, p. 9. April 17, 1917.

 

A day to remember, 1924.

THE “DAY TO PLACE FLOWERS” WAS OBSERVED HERE IN HONOLULU

Just as in years past where Decoration Day [La Kaupua] was observed, so too has it come again on this past Friday, as the graves in the different cemeteries were decorated, and also a parade of soldiers was held upland of the cemetery of Nuuanu, where speeches were given as well as songs, for the observances on that day.

All of the cemeteries were decorated with flowers; from Thursday night the graves were being decorated until noon of the following Friday, showing that the observation of Decoration Day is given much thought to by the people these days.

A majority of the day was spent by the people going around from graveyard to graveyard looking at the adornments of the graves, and one thing heard amongst the people making their rounds was that the flowers and lei done with great care were beautiful.

At nine thirty in the morning, the parade of the soldiers and some organizations began from within the palace grounds up to the cemetery in Nuuanu, and being that some people were occupied with prayers at other cemeteries, this parade was not given any thought to, except by those who were not participating in decorating flowers on that day.

[Memorial Day (Decoration Day), which was held on the 30th of May and is now held on the last Monday of May, can be found in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers as La Kaupua (“day to place flowers”) or La Lupua (“day to strew flowers”).]

(Kuokoa, 6/5/1924, p. 1)

HOOMANAOIA KA LA KAUPUA MA HONOLULU NEI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 23, Aoao 1. Iune 5, 1924.

Peleioholani’s home is destroyed by fire, 1901.

ANCIENT RELICS

WERE DESTROYED

Valuable Feather Cloak In Peleioholani’s Fire Claim.

BELONGED TO KEEAUMOKU

THE CLAIMANT’S ANCESTOR

While Husband and Wife Were Shut Out By Quarantine the Flames Swept Away Their Home.

Claims of native Hawaiians were resumed before the Fire Claims Commission yesterday morning. Two of these were called this morning, one of which is of more than ordinary interest.

S. L. Peleioholani presents a claim for $2000 and it appears to be a perfectly straight one. The claimant is a lineal descendant of high chiefs and among his household possessions were heirlooms of great value. Indeed, it is scarcely practicable to measure their value in money, the articles having both historical and ethnological—it might be added without joking, ornithological—interest.

Of the last-named class was a feather cloak, the only one existing of its class except the famous garment of Kamehameha treasured in the British Museum. This cloak descended to Peleioholani from his great-great-grandfather, Keeaumoku, a high chief whose name is given to one of the streets of Honolulu. Evidence was presented before the Commission showing that the claimant refused $500 from Mrs. Marry Ailau, the well-known dealer and connoisseur in Hawaiian relics, several years ago. Yes, and when she sent a relative to further sound the owner on his selling figure an offer of $700 for the cloak was declined by him.

Peleioholani had also a few calabashes of high value, besides other ancient objects of native art.

Why did not Mr. Peleoholani or his wife rescue all this archaeological wealth from the advancing flames? It is an easy question and its answer is not mysterious. The husband was working at his trade of a carpenter on the Castle house, while his wife was away from home on some errand, when the rigid quarantine came down suddenly as a Pali cloud. In consequence the couple could not gain access to their home and the tempest of flame came and swept it away.

Peleioholani lost sundry articles of latter day manufacture and utility, which went to make up his claim. An item was sixty fathoms of inch and a half rope at $47, this being the price he paid for it at an auction sale. He explained that he used the hawser in connection with building and house-moving operations. Scion of a noble house as he is, Peleioholani gave the Commissioners the impression of an honorable man.

[See what was said in an article from one of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers here.]

(Evening Bulletin, 10/15/1901, p. 1)

ANCIENT RELICS WERE DESTROYED

Evening Bulletin, Volume XI, Number 1968, Page 1. October 15, 1901.