Hawaiian-based? fashion in New York, 1921.

[Found under: “Maison Fashion Offers These Eight Appealing Suggestions For Miss Manhattan’s Everyday Wardrobe For the Coming Spring and Summer”]

This cool-looking ripply-ruffly frock of white crepe de chine puts the wearer in just the proper mood for her tropical feather hat in Hawaiian effect.

Underwood

(New York Tribune, 3/13/1921, pt. 6, p. 12)

This cool-looking...

New York Tribune, Volume LXXX, Number 27,146, Part 6, Page 12. March 13, 1921.

Advertisements

Fashion setting, 1901.

[Found in an advertisement for Hale’s Good Goods store in San Francisco]

In ready-to-wear hats

We are showing now a splendid variety of chic, nobby styles. This imitation of the Hawaiian hat, bound with silk and trimmed with silk and gold scarf, for $1.25 is a splendid illustration of the money’s worth we can give you Two or three others:…

(San Francisco Call, 3/24/1901, p. 32)

In ready-to-wear hats

The San Francisco Call, Volume LXXXIX, Number 114, Page 32, March 24, 1901.

Hawaiian influence in music and fashion, 1917.

IN THE MOMENTS’ MODES

Her Hawaiian Hat

IF WE listen to fashion authorities today we are convinced that harmony is just important to millinery as it is to music, and its influence prevails in both alike. This may account for the Hawaiian influence extending from “Aloha oe” and the like to this new leghorn hat, which has a brim apparently unfinished, with the edge not a little suggestive of the grass skirts worn by Hawaiian belles. The brim is of natural color straw and the flowers and trimmings are made of straw, all of which are enhanced by way of contrast with the rich seafoam or blue crown of the favored Yo-San silk.

(Evening Ledger, 4/5/1917, p. 12)

IN THE MOMENTS' MODES

Evening Ledger, Volume III, Number 174, Page 12. April 5, 1917.