David Kawananakoa speaks on annexation, 1893.

WILL APPEAL TO CONGRESS.

Ex-Queen Liliuokalani’s Commissioner Arrives at the National Capital.

Washington, Feb. 18.—Paul Neuman, the envoy of Queen Liliuokalani to the United States, accompanied by Prince David, of the royal family, and two servants, reached the city late last night, and took apartments at the Richmond. To-day Mr. Neuman held a conference with acting Secretary of State Wharton, with whom he had a long talk concerning the object of his visit. Mr. Wharton could, of course, do nothing, and Mr. Neuman expressed himself as satisfied that his only chance for successfully representing the claims of the ex-Queen lay through the medium of Congress. Prince David said: “We do not intend to make a struggle against annexation. If the United States government sees fit to annex Hawaii we shall make no complaints.”

[I am not sure if this statement was ever published in any Hawaii newspaper.]

(Indianapolis Journal, 2/19/1893, p. 4)

WILL APPEAL TO CONGRESS.

The Indianapolis Journal, Page 4. February 19, 1893.

Uncle Sam and the Queen, 1893.

[One of the days found in: “A RECORD OF SIX DAYS.”]

WEDNESDAY

UNCLES SAM

TO HAWAII:

HOLD ON A MINUTE UNTIL YOU ARE PROPERLY DRESSED

(Morning Call, 2/19/1893, p. 1)

WEDNESDAY

The Morning Call, Volume LXXIII, Number 81, Page 1. February 19, 1893.

 

 

Morning Call and Princess Kaiulani’s protest, 1893.

WAIL OF A PRINCESS.

Kaiulani Will Come to America in Her Own Interest.

She Was Sent Away to Be Educated, and Now She Is Kept In Ignorance.

Special to The Morning Call.

London, Feb. 18.—The Princess Kaiulani sends the following address to the American people:

“Four years ago, at the request of Thurston, the Hawaiian Cabinet Minister, I was sent away to England to be educated privately and fitted  for the position which, by the constitution of Hawaii, I was to inherit.

“All these years I have patiently and in exile striven to fit myself for my return this year to my country.

“I am now told that Thurston is in Washington asking you to take away my flag and my throne. No one tells me even this officially. Have I done anything wrong that this wrong should be done me and my people?

“I am coming to Washington to plead for my throne, my nation and my flag. Will not the great American people hear me?

“Kaiulani.”

Washington, Feb. 18.—While the annexation commissioners were paying their respects to Secretary Elkins at the War Department this morning their diplomatic antagonist, Paul Neumann, the ex-Queen’s representative, was in another part of the building in consultation with acting Secretary Wharton of the State Department, with whom he had a long talk concerning the object of his visit. Wharton, of course, could do nothing, and Neumann expressed himself as satisfied. His chance for successfully representing the claims of the ex-Queen lay through the medium of Congress.

Prince David said: “We do not intend to make a struggle against annexation. If the United States Government sees fit to annex Hawaii we shall make no complaint.”

[Although the same quote was printed in newspapers across America, what each newspaper did with the title varies. Also, what they put next to the article should be looked at as well. The Morning Call was printed in San Francisco.

The quote by David Kawananakoa at the bottom is interesting.]

(Morning Call, 2/19/1893, p. 1)

WAIL OF A PRINCESS.

The Morning Call, Volume LXXIII, Number 81, Page 1. February 19, 1893.

Kekaulike appointed governor of Hawaii Island, 1880.

[Found under: “Ma ke Kauoha.”]

It pleases the Chief, the King, to appoint Her Highness Kekaulike as Governor for the island of Hawaii, in the place left behind by Her Highness, the Princess Likelike.

(Kuokoa, 9/18/1880, p. 2)

Ua oluolu i ke alii...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIX, Helu 38, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 18, 1880.

 

Princess Regent Liliuonamoku, 1881.

The Journey of the Princess Regent.

In the evening of this past Tuesday, the Likelike took the Chiefess, the Regent Liliuonamoku to Hawaii. She was attended by Governor Kekaulike, Hon. J. E. Bush, Hon. J. M. Kapena, and some others. The Chiefess will spend some days in Hilo, and then she will make a circuit of Hawaii. Our hope is that her journey will be accompanied by safety, and the good health of all.

(Kuokoa, 8/6/1881, p. 2)

Ka Huakai Makaikai a ke Kahu Aupuni.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XX, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Augate 6, 1881.

Princess Kaiulani protests, 1893.

A PRINCESS OUT OF A JOB

London, Feb. 18.—Princess Kaiulani sends the following address to the American people:

“Four years ago, at the request of Mr. Thurston, then a Hawaiian minister, I was sent to England to be educated privately and fitted for the position which by…

THE PRINCESS KAIULANI.

…the constitution of Hawaii I was to inherit. All these years I have patiently striven to fit myself for my return, this year, to my native country. I now am told that Mr. Thurston is in Washington asking you to take away my flag and my throne. No one tells me even this officially. Have I done anything wrong that this wrong should be done to me and my people? I am coming to plead for my throne, my nation and my flag. Will not the great American people hear me?”

[Signed.] “Kaiulani.”

(Wichita Daily Eagle, 2/19/1893, p. 2)

THE PRINCESS OUT OF A JOB.

The Wichita Daily Eagle, Volume XVIII, Number 82, Page 2. February 19, 1893.