Hōkūleʻa, 1980 / 2015.

HOKULEʻA RETURNS

by Wayne Washburn

Greeted by a blessing of light showers, flowers, music, dance and many hugs and kisses, the crew members of the Hokuleʻa returned from Tahiti at 1:00 p.m. on June 6.

After 25 days at sea the crew slowly made its way through the crowd to a stage at Magic Island where the Royal Hawaiian Band, Leinaala Heine Kalama’s hula halau, and a musical group with the same name as the double-hulled canoe. Hokuleʻa, performed as part of the welcoming ceremony.

Each voyager was greeted by Gov. Ariyoshi and presented with a wooden bowl. In reference to the voyage Ariyoshi stated “…It once again demonstrates that in Hawaii the skills and the courage and the ability of the old Hawaiian is not lost, but remains with the modern native sons and daughters of Hawaii.”

Nainoa Thompson, the navigator, became the first Hawaiian to navigate by using the stars and currents in at least 200 years. The preciseness of his course has been heralded by many as a modern navigational triumph. Mayor Fasi said the voyage illustrated that: “The people of Hawaiian ancestry in Hawaii…can show the determination to get any job done that they set their hearts on.

This marked the second successful completion of a round trip voyage to Tahiti. The first voyage to Tahiti in 1976 was navigated by Mau Piailug, a celestial navigator from Satawal in Micronesia. The return trip to Hawaii was completed using modern navigational equipment and methods. A 1978 attempt to reach Tahiti ended in tragedy when Hokuleʻa swamped in the Molokai Channel. Crew member Eddie Aikau was lost in an attempt to reach help. The present trip was the first to use celestial navigation to and from Tahiti.

Credit for the successful completion of the voyage goes to many individuals and organizations within and outside of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. Many Hawaiians however, look with pride to Nainoa Thompson as being their hero through his hard work and the invaluable teachings of Mau that successful navigation by a Hawaiian has become a reality.

Much work is yet to be done. Data which was collected on the trip now has to be interpreted. This hopefully will shed further light on navigating by the stars to modern navigators. Other possible uses of the information may be included in ocean survival techniques as well as voyages to other parts of Polynesia in the future.

Hōʻea mai ka waʻa kaulua ʻo Hōkūleʻa

Me ka pōmaikaʻi o ke Akua ka hoʻolei me nā lei nani ke kanipila leʻa a me ke aloha ua hoʻokipa maila i na poʻe holomoana ma ka waʻa Hōkūleʻa i kā lākou hoʻi hou mai i ka hola ʻekahi o ke awakea ma ka lā ʻeono o June.

He ʻiwakāluakūmālima lā i holo mai ma Tahiti a hiki i ka hōʻea a pae ma Magic Island. Ala Moana Pāka ma Honolulu nei. A aia lā, he mau poʻe i anaina i hoʻokipa me ka hauʻoli. A laila, ua haʻiʻōlelo nā poʻe luna aupuni, ke kiaʻāina Ariyoshi a me ka Mayor Fasi me ka ʻōlelo hoʻomaikaʻi no ka holo moana kaulana. ʻŌlelo ke kiaʻāina, “…it once again demonstrates that in Hawaii the skills and the courage and the ability of the old Hawaiian is not lost but remains with the modern native sons and daughters of Hawaii.”

No ka mea, ʻo ke kanaka hoʻokele waʻa, Nāinoa Thompson, he kanaka mua loa ma hope o ka hala o ke au kahiko e hoʻokele waʻa me nā hōkū a kilo i ke ao lewa me ka moana. A laila, haʻi mai ka Mayor, “The people of Hawaiian ancestry in Hawaii…can show the determination to get any job done that they set their hearts on.”

A kēia holo moana ka holo ʻelua i loaʻa ka pono. ʻO ka holo mua loa ma ka M. H. 1976 na Mau Pialug, he kanaka Maikonia mai i hoike mai i hoʻokele waʻa a i ka hoʻi hou mai ua hoʻokele nā poʻe holo moana me nā mea hoʻokele hou o kēia ao nei. Ma mua o kēia holo ʻelua ua holo ka waʻa Hōkūleʻa ma ka moana a piholo ihola a ua loaʻa ke kaumaha i ka lilo ʻo Eddie Aikau i ke kai.

E hoʻomaikaʻi i nā poʻe o ka Polynesian Voyaging Society a me nā poʻe a pau a me na ʻahahui Hawaiʻi e kākoʻo iā lākou. Haʻaheo nō kākou i ka hana hoʻokele waʻa a Nāinoa Thompson me nā poʻe kānaka holo moana o ka waʻa Hōkūleʻa. Akā, ʻaʻole pau ka hana i kēia manawa no ka mea nui nā mea aʻo i ʻohi ʻia ai a hoʻopaʻa kākau ma ka palapala no laila e nānā pono a ʻimi noiʻi i ka naʻauao. A malia paha e kokua ana i nā poʻe loea e hoʻokele ma kēia ao nei i kā lākou hana ma ka moana nui.

[Now on their worldwide voyage, Mālama Honua!]

(Alahou, 5/1/1980, p. 7)

HOKULEʻA RETURNS

Ke Alahou, Helu 6 & 7, Aoao 7. May-June 1980.

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Albert Kunuiakea baptized, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Baptized.—The Honorable Kunuiakea was baptized in the Anglican faith, by the Lord Bishop of Honolulu, at the Church at Peleula, and his name he was baptized with is Albert Fredrick Kunuiakea Oiwiaulani Koenaokalani. Present was his hanai mother, the dowager Queen K. Hakaleleponi, and the Honorable Col. Peter Young Kekuaokalani, and Col. D. Kalakaua.

(Kuokoa, 11/22/1862, p. 2)

Bapetisoia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Novemaba 22, 1862.

Prince Albert baptized, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Ka Haku o Hawaii Baptized.—His Highness, ka Prince of Hawaii was baptized at 10 oʻclock on Saturday, the 23rd of this month at the Palace [Hale Alii], by Rev. E. W. Clark [E. W. Kalaka], in the Anglican faith, before his Royal Parents, the Alii, and the Ministers, and his was named Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Leiopapa a Kamehameha. The wife of the British Commissioner stood in for Queen Victoria of England, the godmother [makuahine Papatema] of the young chief, and Mr. Synge, the British Commissioner, stood in for the Prince of Wales, the Heir to the Throne of England. It was intended for the Bishope to do the baptismal, but because he has not arrived, and the Alii is in distress, therefore, he was baptized before the Commissioner of England who is among the Royal court here.

(Kuokoa, 8/30/1862, p. 2)

Babetisoia ka Haku o Hawaii.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke 1, Helu 40, Aoao 2. Augate 30, 1862.

Queen Emma baptized, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

The Queen Baptized.—On Tuesday, the 21st of this month, the Queen was baptized at the Palace [Hale Alii]. Bishop Rev. T. N. Staley performed the baptism in the fashion of the Anglican faith, and the name of the Queen that she was baptized with is Alexadrina Francis Agnes Lowder Byde Rooke Young Kaleleokalani. Present were all the alii and the friends of the royal court of Hawaii nei. There as well was the Commissioner of Great Britain and his Wife as well.

(Kuokoa, 10/25/1862, p. 2)

Bapetizoia ka Moi Wahine.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Okatoba 25, 1862.

Ku kilakila o Kamehameha, Kuu home hoonaauao… rang out in Long Beach, 1926.

THERE WAS GREAT DELIGHT IN THE SINGING OF MISS LOUISE POHINA

A newspaper from Long Beach, California described how the recent singing of Miss Louise Pohina became something that the haole who showed up to hear her were greatly delighted in, joining in with those who went to offer their thanks and congratulations to her, the singers, and the skilled dancers.

There was a concert given in this city by the Ebell Club, with Miss Pohina singing some numbers and Lillian Edwards of Pasadena playing the piano; at the concert, the audience kept clapping for each song performed by Miss Pohina, and one of those songs was Kamehameha Waltz. Continue reading

English and education, 1903.

The Problem Of Language

Some interesting comments of the solution of the language difficulty in the public schools of the islands are contained in the reports of Normal Inspectors to Superintendent Atkinson. There are few, if any, countries in the world where so much diversity of language confronts the teachers as in Hawaii, and two of the inspectors express the opinion that in quick solution of the problem of speech Hawaii leads the world.

Inspector J. K. Burkett, of the First and Fourth Circuits, says:

“When we  consider how mixed is the population, from how many nationalities our teaching force is recruited, and how the whole is mixed as it were in the crucible of English, bringing forth not a garbled and provincial English speech, but one based upon  the best models, the outcome is truly marvelous. There is probably no country on the face of the globe which has succeeded in solving this difficult problem of speech, so quickly as this has. The work of the schools in my districts has been directed to the thorough instilling of English, colloquial English. But though English is the foundation and the study most carefully and thoroughly instilled, it is not the final end of our effort. The course of study is carefully followed, and we have every branch given its full due. Some schools may be more successful than others, some teachers command better results than others, but the whole school system of these two districts stands at a very high average. I would like before closing to register my unqualified sentiments of satisfaction with the teaching force of the districts, and would say that few places in the Union can show as able and as energetic teachers as we have. Especial credit must be given to those who have had no other advantage than the education of our own schools, completed in the Honolulu Normal. These young men and young women have proved what local work can and will do, if properly guided and earnestly carried out.

“I look for a great future for education in these Islands. With much toil and much careful thought, many most difficult problems have been solved and a most valuable foundation has been laid. Upon this a magnificent super-structure will be raised which will do honor to the Territory and its people.”

Charles W. Baldwin, Inspector for the Third Circuit says:

“In conclusion I may say, though the Inspector feels that he has failed in much, that failure has been due to the facts already set forth in this report—the need of methods more in harmony with those of our Normal school has been so great that almost his entire attention has been towards the accomplishment of that object. While there is yet much to criticize, of the schools as a whole it is certain that they are a decided step in advance of the work that was being done when the Inspector first undertook his new duties. Of the future it may be said that, if our present educational system is allowed to remain untrammelled, that we will excel all schools in methods for teaching English; and nowhere on earth will teachers be found better fitted to handle non-English speaking children.”

(Hawaiian Star, 3/5/1903, p. 7)

The Problem Of Language

The Hawaiian Star, Volume X, Number 3419, Page 7. March 5, 1903.