New Korean church built in Lihue, 1906.

KOREAN CHURCH DEDICATED

ELEELE, Kauai, Nov. 13.—”Like a village standing on a hill,” such is the beautiful church of the Koreans recently built in Lihue, Kauai; it is the building where the Koreans who live in Hanamaulu, Lihue, and there about worship.

This lovely building stands on a rise overlooking the valley of Hanamaulu, and it can be seen proudly standing from all places close by.

This church was built through the assistance of the sugar plantations, and from philanthropists of Lihue, the people who are known to desire fine and righteous endeavors.

On this past Sunday, the consecration of the church was held. People of all ethnicities could come to watch the events of the day. Rev. John Wadman, the superintendent of the Korean mission here, and Rev. S. Hyen performed the consecration that day. Following the prayer of consecration, speeches of congratulations were given by pastors of the different churches of Lihue; amongst the pastors was Rev. Hans Isenberg of the German church who also gave a speech of encouragement, and his words captivated those who were there.

(Kuokoa, 11/23/1906, p. 5)

HOOLAAIA KA LUAKINI O NA KOREA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 47, Aoao 5. Novemaba 23, 1906.

From Chicago to Honolulu to go to school? 1929.

CHILDREN COME TO ATTEND SCHOOL IN HAWAII NEI

Three Korean children named Korea Chang, 9 years old, Rose Chang, 8, and Samuel Chang, 7, arrived in Honolulu this past Saturday from the city of Chicago, to go to school here in Honolulu.

They entered the Korean school here, where it is believed they will remain to be educated for five years.

There are many children at this Korean school who are now hoping to go to school in America, and here are children from America coming to school in Hawaii nei.

This attests to the quality of the Korean school in Honolulu.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 3/7/1929, p. 2)

HELE MAI HE MAU KEIKI I KE KULA I HAWAII NEI

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 45, Aoao 2. Maraki 7, 1929.

Korean National Association 7th Anniversary, 1915.

DAY OF CELEBRATION OF THE KOREAN PEOPLE.

This past Monday the Korean People observed their annual  celebration for the seventh anniversary of the establishment of the Korean National Association [Ahahui Lahui Korea] in Hawaii nei; there was a march in the afternoon, and in the parade of that day there were several hundreds of children who also joined in. The parade began from their compound at eleven o’clock, went down Beretania Street, up Miller Street, down Punchbowl Street back to their compound at the corner of Punchbowl and Beretania, the former grounds of the theology school Pacific H. T. Institute.

There were about a thousand Koreans who joined in on this parade, made up of men, women, and children. There were several hundreds of Korean youths in their military uniforms carrying rifles on their shoulders and the band played along with the marching of the soldiers. Continue reading

A “fishing” accident, 1913.

MAIMED FROM AN EXPLOSION OF GIANT POWDER

How reckless are the lawless, those who fish by setting off giant powder [kiana pauda] without fear resulting from the many people whose hands were maimed and without stopping this activity; because this past Sunday, a Korean was brought to the Queen’s Hospital with his hand blown off and a side of his face falling victim to the giant powder.

It was only because of the quick action taken by Deputy Sheriff [Hope Makai Nui] Davis of Koolaupoko and Dr. Tuttle that that Korean was saved by stopping the heavy bleeding from his injuries earlier in proper time.

That Korean went that Sunday to blast fish with giant power and his body was found by Deputy Sheriff Davis of Koolaupoko, he was lying on the sand on the side of Kaneohe Bay near Mokapu.

The first thing Deputy Sheriff Davis did was to bring that Korean to Kaneohe, and called for Dr. Tuttle; he hurried in answering to the call, and that is how the Korean’s life was spared; he was would have been in trouble because of the tremendous amount of bleeding.

According to what is understood about how that Korean received his injuries: he went with a friend that day to fish, and because he was not accustomed to and very inept at handling giant powder, that is how this senseless tragedy befell him.

A twist of giant powder was thrown after lighting the fuse, and because it did not go off, that Korean went to grab it and check it out, and while he was handling it, it exploded, and his had flew off, and almost his whole face was burnt by the powder.

When the government man found the Korean, found also was a twist of giant powder ready to ignite and throw into the ocean.

[Notice how the dash in the first word of the title, “pa-huia” signifies that the syllable after the dash is lengthened, and also how the passive “ia” is as usual, not set off—today therefore it would be written “pahū ʻia”

(Kuokoa, 3/21/1913, p. 1)

PA-HUIA E KE KIANA PAUDA A MUUMUU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VL, Helu 12, Aoao 1. Maraki 21, 1913.