The Fire of the Woman Gushes Forth! 1907.

Ua Huaina ke Ahi a ka Wahine!

[One of the fun features of Ka Na’i Aupuni newspaper was the subheader featured in its masthead. It would be changed daily and often featured olelo noeau, or a headline from the news of the day.]

(Na’i Aupuni, 1/11/1907, p. 1)

Ka Na’i Aupuni, Buke III, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Ianuari 11, 1907.

Passing of Benjamin Nalaeelua Kahalepuna, 1937.

B. N. Kahalepuna Called By Death

Was 25 Years In Employ Of Territory

Benjamin N. Kahalepuna, 58, died Monday at his home at 2310 Pauoa road after a brief illness. He was born at Kaneohe, Oahu, September 7, 1879, and had served in the territorial government for more than 25 years.

He was appointed to the bureau of conveyances in 1898 and two years later served as a school teacher. In 1907 he was appointed to a position in the sheriff’s office under Col. Curtis P. Iaukea, and was later given the position of sergeant of police under W. P. Jarrett. Continue reading

Benjamin Nalaeelua Kahalepuna spends time with his father for the holidays, 1920.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko”]

Aboard the Kinau of this past evening, Mr. B. N. Kahalepuna left for Koloa, Kauai, to spend his Christmas with his birth father, William Keaumaikai Bacle, and in the afternoon of this coming Tuesday, he will leave Kauai to come back to town.

(Kuokoa, 12/24/1920, p. 4)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 52, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 24, 1920.

On the passing of Mileka Paia, 1920.

AN EXPRESSION OF ALOHA.

MRS. MILEKA PAIA.

To the Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, aloha nui oe:—Please may you be patient in inserting in an open space of the columns of the esteemed newspaper of the lahui so that the many intimates and friends will know, and it shall be the speedy messenger pigeon that carries to all the neighborhoods of our islands, from where the sun arrives at Haehae until where it sets at the base of Lehua, that Mrs. Mileka Paia has passed, the lehua blossom has faded; she sleeps the sleep of summer and winter; the lehua scattering rain of Panaewa will no more sprinkle upon her, the Kanilehua rain will no more mist upon her cheeks, the lehua lei of Olaa will no more adorn her; and following her are mounds of tears being cried for her constantly night and day, while trying to calm the aloha that cannot be calmed, for she is gone, no more will we see her and hear her voice. Auwe, how heart wrenching! Continue reading