Queen Liliuokalani’s gift to the leprosy patients, 1891.

GIFT OF ALOHA TO THE LEPROSY PATIENTS AT KALIHI.

We each all are going without a companion at our side, and no child before us or at our back, it is just our lone bodies going naked to the Colony of Kalawao, and there is no way out of it for us for there is the law of our beloved land upon our shoulders.

These red silk kerchiefs which you see on our necks, and your sums of money in our hands this day, it is a memorial for us during the days of our lives in this dejected world, until the dust of that unfamiliar land is spread upon our bodies, and this decaying body returns to the earth, and the spirit returns to God.

Therefore, may your majesty take our great thanks for you. And that is when the Queen replied:

I take your thanks with me, and you will go and you will see my children, those are your seniors living upon that great flat lands, and perhaps we will all be there, but we do not know.

This was the touching statement, and the close to the conversation with the Queen.

Here are the names of the patients taken and their place of residence.

Miss Helina Kaiwaokalani Maikai, Miss Kaehuokalani, Miss M. Kalama [? Miss M. Kalaina], they are from Honolulu; Napoliona Keawe (m), from Manoa, Oahu; Miss Mapo (f), Kahaku (m), from Waialua, Oahu; Ah Ping from Hanalei, Kauai; Henry Keku, Akoi, from Wailuku; Alualu (f), Ulunui (f) from Waikapu; Maraea Kaluna from Olowalu; Liwai Haalelea from Kukuihaele, Hawaii.

These are the patients left at the receiving station of Kalihi:

W. K. Makakoa, G. K. Kepoikai, from Waiehu, Maui; Josiah Kaina from Lihue, Kauai; William Kalani Kalua from Puako, Waimea, Hawaii.

These are the patients who have not been examined by the Doctors:

Keopuhiwa from Hana; Keoahu (f), and Huliwaa (f), and Lutiana Keliikaapuni (f), from Kaupo, Maui; and Joe, a Portuguese boy from Honolulu.

On the 17th of July, Mrs. Kaikioewa Ulukou gave gifts once again to the patients at Kalihi.

Aloha one and all.

WILLIE KALIKOKALANI.

Kalihi Hospital, July 20, 1891.

[Might anyone know how/if Liwai Haalelea and Levi Haalelea (d. 1864) are related?]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 7/29/1891, p. 2)

HE MAKANA ALOHA I NA MA'I LEPERA MA KALIHI.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 247, Aoao 2. Iulai 29, 1891.

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And yet more on Aberahama Kaikioewa Palekaluhi, 1912.

THE ALII HAS GONE, A. K. PELEKALUHI KAIKIOEWA KAMEHAMEHANUI

Mr. Editor of the Newspaper Kuokoa. Aloha to you:—Please be so kind as to insert in some open space in our paper, this short remembrance below for my beloved who passed over to that world.

On the morning of Tuesday, June 28 [?], 1912, the angel of death visited our beloved home in Kalihi, and took the living breath of A. K. Palekaluhi Kaikioewa Kamehamehanui, and left his earthly body here in this world, and his soul returned to the One who created it, leaving the bundle of sadness behind for us and the grandchildren, the family, the intimates, and friends to grieve over.

He was born from the loins of Mrs. Liliha Kamehamehanui and Kulinui at Waimea, Kauai, on the 1st of November, 1830, and died on June 28, 1912; therefore, he was 81 years and 6 months, and 26 days old.

He was educated at the college of Waioli, Kauai, in his youth. After his days at that school were over, he returned to live with the King Kauikeaouli; he lived with his mother until he went back to Kauai.

He married his wife, and they lived well for a great many years. He was employed as a tax assessor for ten years and then returned to Honolulu in 1887 [?] until 1881, and was the tax assessor for the district of Koolaupoko, Oahu.

In 1882, he resided with Keelikolani in Kona, and at her death in 1883, he came back to Honolulu and remained there until his recent death.

He was a native of Kauai of Manokalanipo, and a hereditary chief which all the alii knew of and also the general public was familiar with him.

He worked as a carpenter for the real estate company headed by W. C. Achi until 1903. He worked as a carpenter for America, and he was one of the carpenters when the fort at Puuloa was being built.

In 1911, he went back to live at Kahana, Koolauloa, in the month of July. From January 1912, he became ill and in March he was bedridden, and then in April he was brought back to Honolulu, and on the day shown above he died at his home in Kalihi.

He was a father for the multitudes, and with his passing, he leaves me and our child with memories of him, and grieving for him, with a sad and heavy heart.

We with grief,

MISS MARYANN K. PALEKALUHI,

MRS. MARIE K. PALEKALUHI.

Kamehameha IV Road, Kalihi.

(Kuokoa, 7/12/1912, p. 6)

UA HALA KE ALII A. K. PELEKALUHI KAIKIOEWA KAMEHAMEHANUI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 28, Aoao 6. Iulai 12, 1912.

Aberahama Kaikioewa Palekaluhi and the malo of Kaumualii,

See this story about A. K. Palekaluhi’s description of a malo of Kaumualii’s, the king of Kauai, found in Additional Notes on Hawaiian Feather Work: a second supplement by William T. Brigham, in Memoirs of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum of Polynesian Ethnology and Natural History, Vol VII.—No. 1, 1918. pp. 30–39.

I am not sure if this is what is described here at the Bishop Museum.

Even more on Aberahama Kaikioewa Palekaluhi (if it could be read), 1912.

THAT HIGH CHIEF OF THE LAND HAS GONE.

On Tuesday morning the merciless hand of death stretched out and took the life of that high chief, A. K. Palekaluhi at eighty-one years of life, at his residence in Kalihi. He is a true high chiefly descendant of Hawaii, of Liliha, who is of the lineage and a descendant of Kamehameha Nui, the king of Maui. His died because of the infirmities of old age.

To understand @@@@@, here is his genealogy.

In the lineage of the alii of Hawaii—Keawe, the king of Hawaii wed with Kalanikauleleiaiwi and born was Kekuiapoiwanui (f) who married [male] Kekaulike (m), the king of Maui, and born was Kamehameha Nui, the king of Maui, who married Manuhaaipo (f) and born was Kalaniuluamoku (m), who married Kualiiwahine and born was Loeauwahine (f), who married Koakanu (m) and born was Liliha (w) who married Kulinui (m) and born was A. K. Palekaluhi.

See page four.

[If you look below, most of this first column is hard to decipher, and much of the volunteer input would have likely been @@@@@ @@@@@. Hopefully people will think seriously about how much priceless information will be lost if the original newspapers are not clearly photographed before typescripts are done.]

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 5/31/1912, p. 1)

HALA IA ALII KIEKIE O KA AINA.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 22, Aoao 1. Mei 31, 1912.

THAT HIGH CHIEF OF THE LAND HAS GONE

From Page One.

In the lineage of the alii of Maui—Kaulaheanui married Kalanikauleleaiwi, his first wife, and born was Kekuiapoiwanui. Kaulaheanui married Papaikaniau, his following wife, and born was Kekaulike, the king of Maui, who married Kekuiapoiwanui (f), and born was Kamehameha Nui, who married Manuhaaipo (f) and born was Kalaniulumoku who married Keohookeuki (f), born was Koakanunui who married Loeauwahinenui (f), and born was Liliha (f), who married Kulinui (m), and born was A. Kaikioewa Palekaluhi.

At 10 o’clock this morning, was the funeral over his remains at his eternal home at the cemetery at Koula.

There were many people who joined his last procession.

[It is interesting to see how different newspapers have different information in their coverage of the same event!]

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 5/31/1912, p. 4)

MAKE IA ALII KIEKIE O KA AINA

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 22, Aoao 4. Mei 31, 1912.

 

More on Aberahama Kaikioewa Palekaluhi, 1912.

THAT HEAVENLY ONE PASSED BY, STAGGERED AWAY,

GONE ON THAT DARK PATH OF KANE

On the morning of this past Tuesday, May 28th, the shocking news spread all over the capital of the Territory of Hawaii, that the terrifying sickle of the angel of death was stretched out and cut short the life of the High Chief Abraham Kaikioewa Palekaluhi, at eighty-one years of living on this earth. Death took him from his home in Kalihi.

He was a favorite chiefly descendant in the court of the past Kings of Hawaii, all the way until the high chiefs living now. He had many positions in the government. He was a tax assessor at one point, and a tax collector as well. He managed a bar at the corner mauka of the corner of King Street and Nuuanu Avenue. He was a skilled mechanic. He was a friend and a ally of all. He was a true believer in the Roman Catholic faith, and he was in the Republican party until his last breath. This Friday, May 31st, his remains [kino wailua] was carried to the last abode where his body would be laid.

He descended from two royal lineages, from Hawaii and from Maui.

Hawaii Island Lineage:—Keawe, the King of Hawaii, “wed” [noho] with Kalanikauleleiaiwi (f) and Kekuiapoiwanui (f) was born, who wed Kekaulike (m), the King of Maui, and Kamehameha Nui was born (which was not Kamehameha I, Ka Na’i Aupuni of Hawaii), who wed with Manuhaaipo (f) and Kalaniulumoku (m) was born, who wed Kualiiwahine (f) and born was Loeauwahine (f), who wed Koakanu (m), and Liliha (f) was born, who wed Kulinui (m) and Aberahama Kaikioewa Palekaluhi was born.

Maui Island Lineage:—Kaulaheanuikane (m), King of Maui wed [hoao] with Kalanikauleleiaiwi (f), which was his first wife, and Kekuiapoiwa (f) was born. Kaulaheanui (m) married again to Papaikaniau (f), his second wife, and born was Kekaulike (m), the King of Maui, who wed Kekuiapoiwanui (f), and born was Kamehameha Nui, who wed Manuhaaipo (f), and born was Kalaniulumoku (m), who wed Keohokeuki (f) and born was Koakanu Nui (m), who wed Loeaunui (f), and born was Liliha (f), who wed Kulinui (m), and born was Aberahama Kaikioewa Palekaluhi.

(Aloha Aina, 6/1/1912, p. 1)

AUI, NEWA'KU LA IA LANI, HALA I KE ALA POLOHIWA A KANE

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 22, Aoao 1. Iune 1, 1912.

Aberahama Kaikioewa Palekaluhi passes away, 1912.

THAT HIGH CHIEF OF THE LAND HAS GONE.

At his residence in Kalihi, on this past Tuesday morning, A. K. Palekaluhi, one of the high chiefs of this land grew weary of this life, at 81 years of age.

A. K. Palekaluhi, who died, was a high chief, as he was a son of Liliha, a high chiefess, a descendant of Kamehameha Nui, the King of the Island of Maui. On this morning, there will be a funeral over his body from the mortuary of H. H. Williams under the administration of the Catholic faith.

While Palekaluhi was living, he always carried with him a pocket watch given to him as a present by a kaukau alii; the amazing thing about that watch was that the initials and letters of his name were the hours in place of the Roman numerals you normally see on all watches. During his youth, he had much power in politics. Greatly loved is that native chief!

[Notice how this has much more information than just what was given in the Vital Statistics column in the same issue of Kuokoa.]

(Kuokoa, 5/31/1912, p. 4)

HALA IA ALII KIEKIE O KA AINA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 22, Aoao 4. Mei 31, 1912.