Hula Critique, 1875.

Hula of Haena.

O Lahui Hawaii; Aloha to you:—

While living here in the village of Haena, gazing at the cliff faces of Makana, and enjoying the softly blowing winds of the land, and reveling in the leaves of the kawelu grass; what I am fond of is the beautifully breaking waves, those companion waves which Lohiau surfed in days past, in our old stories. Then I see men, women, and children of this unfamiliar land in which I live, parading to the hula house. How dismaying! O Haena—don’t agonize, but think. Time now has moved forward, and here you are reverting backwards, and stumbling at Kanapo[?]. Here we are, the devout, seeing how truly horrifying the hula is of the people here who are going in droves down into the whirlpool, just as the saying goes, “Kohala is crowded to the very opening.” As soon as the assembly conch is blown, they run and disappear.

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.” [Mataio 11:28] And look at James 5:5. Therefore I am concerned over what was said by the prophet, Ezekiel 33:3–5. Look to this teaching.

With aloha,
D. P. Puniawa,
Haena, Kauai, Oct. 11, 1875.

(Lahui Hawaii, 10/21/1875, p. 2)

Ka Hula o Haena

Lahui Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 43, Aoao 2, Okatoba 21, 1875.

Death announcement, October 27, 1911.

Mrs. Elikapeka Cockett Has Passed On.

On the morning of this Tuesday, Mrs. Elizabeth Cockett died; she was sixty-five years in age, and died on Fort Street. She was born on Molokai. She has five surviving children: James Cockett, Mrs. William G. Brash, Mrs. L. P. Fernandez, Isaac L. Cockett and Henry Cockett. Isaac L. Cockett closed up his shop on Hotel Street this Tuesday morning.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 10/27/1911, p. 1)

UA HALA MA-O O MRS ELIKAPEKA COCKETT

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke IX, Helu 42, Aoao 1. Okatoba 27, 1911.

Vital Statistics Column, October 27, 1911.

Marriages

Arthur V. Lloyd to Annie Enos, Sept. 27.
John Pieper to Hannah South, Oct. 5.
Daniel Mookini to Elizabeth Makaipo, Oct. 11.
Kiliwelio Kapolino to Jane Kanui, Oct. 19.
Foo Luo Wing to Annie Kakia Lum Sing, Oct. 21.

Births

To G. W. Wallace and Lilian Alice Robertson, a son, Oct. 2.
To Chan Sing and Mary Kawelo, a daughter, Oct. 4.
To John Stone and Mary Lilcoln [Lincoln?], a son, Oct. 9.
To Abraham Ahlo and Julian Aiu, a son, Oct. 10.
To James L. Pilipo and Malie Palau, a son, Oct. 17.
To George Hiram and Felmina Kuelo, a son, Oct. 18.
To Harry K. Clark and Adelaide Kahookano, a daughter, Oct. 22.

Deaths.

John Roberts, at the Children’s Hospital, Oct. 14.
A baby of Mrs. Pierce, on Cartwright Road, Oct. 14.
Mrs. Mary Desker, on Young Street, Oct. 16.
Miss Eliza Cockett, on Fort Street, Oct. 24.
Joe Kane, at the Queen’s Hospital, Oct. 24.

(Kuokoa, 10/27/1911, p. 8 )

Na Mare. Na Hanau. Na Make.

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 43, Aoao 8. Okatoba 27, 1911.

Monument to Kamehameha III planned by Daughters of Hawaii, 1911.

Monument Planned

Daughters of Hawaii Plan to Build Monument to Kamehameha III

In a meeting held by the Daughters of Hawaii at the residence of Mrs. L. A. Coney, on Richards Street last week, to think over the subject of building a monument to the alii, Kamehameha III, at Keauhou, Kona, Hawaii; it was undertaken and considered with much enthusiasm by all members present.

The place mentioned above for the building of monument is currently upon lands of the Bishop Estate, and is a very good area desired for that planned project. The ladies named below were chosen as a committee to decide the kind of monument that would be appropriate to be built at that place.

Another subject on the agenda of that meeting was the considering of a proper name for the park in Nuuanu, the first home of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani, and they decided that the park would be called “Emalani Park,” after Queen Emma. Mrs. Ellen Weaver was the committee chosen to go to meet with the Chief Executive Officer of the Campbell Estate. The last subject of that meeting was the decision to send letters of sympathy to Mrs. Nakuina for the passing of her loved ones, her husband and their daughter; with consideration of other small organization business—the presentation by the regents of their annual reports, and as a result of these presentations, the remaining funds of the organization was made clear.

(Kuokoa, 10/27/1911, p. 1)

HOOLALAIA I KIA HOOMANAO

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 27, 1911.

Kaiulani’s birthday, 1890.

Birthday of Kaiulani

This Thursday, October 16th, Her Highness, the Alii, Princess Victoria Kawekiu Kaiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahi Lapalapa, made fifteen years of age. Although the young alii whose birthday it is, is in England in pursuit of education, we hear that the Women’s Horse Riding Association of Liliuokalani commemorated this day by parading on horseback in pa-u, on the morning of the birthday; and that afternoon, there was a great celebratory feast set at Kalaepohaku under the auspices of Mr. William Auld, to celebrate the birthday of this young Princess of Hawaii nei. And we wish [ke puaaenei makou?] that the young alii’s search for education in foreign lands progresses, and her days are lengthened with ease until her return to her homeland amongst her people [mawena o ko lakou mau makaainana?]!

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 10/18/1890)

KA LA HANAU O KAIULANI

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke XIII, Helu 42, Aoao 2, Okatoba 18, 1890.

Birth Announcement of Princess Kaiulani, 1875.

Brand New Princess

We are full of joy at being the ones to announce the news that will make all corners of Hawaii elated, that being at 9:15 in the morning of this past Saturday, October 16th, born here in Honolulu nei, was Princess Victoria Kaiulani Cleghorn by

“Like a kahuli snail of changing colors in the sun
Is the sparking [lohi] flats glittering [lohi] in Maukele
How slow [lohi] are you, dallying
Dallying are you, the woman [one with the “canoe”]
It is you, and now they are gone.”—

that being the Royal child of the Alii, C. Kapaakea and A. Keohokalole, who have passed on without holding their grandchild; and the alii wife of the chief, Ake [“Archie.” Archibald Cleghorn] of this town.

The birth of a new alii is something that will fill loyal subjects with boundless joy and happiness, with thoughts that she will procreate and increase the future generations of the alii now in rule. This is the first birth of a child of one of Keoho’s alii children, therefore, their royal offspring will become a great darling for them all.

We pray for the Heavens’ patience and benevolence, that they watch over her in her youth, and that they lengthen her days, as well as her alii mother, so that she may give birth to many royal children.

(Kuokoa, 10/23/1875, p. 2)

He kama Aliiwahine opio hou loa.

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIV, Helu 43, Aoao 2. Okatoba 23, 1875.

Kaiulani School celebrates Princess Kaiulani’s birthday in 1914.

Birthday of Princess Kaiulani Remembered.

Eleven-hundred and eighty-five students from six through eighteen years in age, both boys and girls of all ethnicities under the sun, celebrated the birthday of the Princess who has passed, Kaiulani, at Kaiulani School on this past Friday. The school grounds were teeming with children and parents; this celebration was not the first, but is done every year by this school; and if the young Princess were still alive, the one for whom this school is called, she would be thirty-nine years old. This is the school with the biggest enrollment in the Territory.

A program of the events of the day was prepared, and due to the small hall, some of the performances were done twice or three times before the same audience.

One of the greatest things seen in this program was the reading of a mele for Kaiulani that was composed by the present school superintendent, Henry Walworth [Walsworth] Kinney. Mr. Kinney was a news writer for one of the papers of Honolulu fifteen years ago; he was also present at the school during the festivities prepared for the day; and when Helen Duncan began to read this mele, everyone was astounded at this mele which was composed with great skill, for this mele was forgotten, but when they heard it being read again, immediately thoughts of aloha welled within them for the young princess who died.

There was a large, life-like portrait of Princess Kaiulani on a wall, which was adorned with lei of ilima and maile, while the children sang “Ka Lei o Kaiulani.” There were small speeches presented by Mr. Gerrit P. Wilder and Mrs. H. H. Webb about the life of the Princess.

Here below is the program of events:

Song—Ainahau—Mabel King on the piano.

Kaiulani—Reading……. Christian Arpe, J. Holt, Norman Alama, V. Kamakawiwoole, J. Ross, and L. Kaulukou.

Song—Lei o Kaiulani—Miss Stewart’s Class

Speeches—Gerrit P. Wilder and Mrs. H. H. Webb.

Kaiulani—Song composed by H. W. Kinney and read by Helen Duncan.

Kaiulani—Song composed by E. W. Wilcox and read by K. Rowland.

Stevenson—A story of the Princess of the Island read by Maria Prestige.

Song—Himeni, O! Hiamoe—Miss Lofquist’s Class.

Kaiulani School was built in 1889.

(Kuokoa, 10/23/1914, p. 4)

HOOMANAOIA KA LA HANAU O KE KAMALIIWAHINE KAIULANI

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LII, Helu 43, Aoao 4. Okatoba 23, 1914.

Deer imported from Japan in 1867

Seven Deer—The Hawaiian Consul in Japan sent to our Benevolent King Kapuaiwa, eight live deer, however one died at sea. These deer were given as a gift to our King. We hear that these deer will be shipped to Molokai and set free; perhaps they will increase should they all live healthily for a long time. We recall that some were taken to Parker Ranch in Waimea, but what became of those deer; maybe they are roaming the cold forests of that mountainous land [aina mauna], and maybe they gave birth to young and are multiplying and becoming abundant on that island.

(Kuokoa, 12/21/1867, p. 2)

He Mau Dia Ehiku

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 51, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 21, 1867.