Lohiauipo’s house disappears, 1892.

That Stone House.

A number of people at Kilauea, Kauai, on hearing of the excavation by the sea of the ancient stone house of Lohiau at Haena, started on Sunday, the 4th inst., to see that treasure, but they were greatly disappointed, as the sea had buried it again after it had remained in view for a week only.

The kamaainas of Haena showed the spot where the relic was, but no one dared to unearth it again. According to them, the stone was of immense dimensions, and required the combined strength of a large number of people to remove it.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 12/13/1892, p. 3)

That Stone House.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XVI, Number 3251, Page 3. December 13, 1892.

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More on the stone house of Lohiau, 1892.

A RELIC UNEARTHED.

A Tidal Wave Brings a Stone House to View.

A correspondent from Kilauea, Kauai, writes to the Advertiser that during the recent tidal wave at Kauai, the sea washed off the beach at Haena for a considerable distance inland, bringing a big stone to view. The stone is said to be cut in the shape of a house, every part being complete. The stone was hollow inside, representing sleeping apartments. The writer, however, does not state whether an ordinary man could sleep in it or not. The sea is now dashing upon the house, and it may be totally destroyed if not removed soon. The stone is situated at the base of the Pali of Ke-e, where the remains of the heathen temple of Lohiau now stands. The residents of Haena claim the stone to be the dwelling house of Lohiau, as it answers to the descriptions of it handed down in history. The neighborhood where the ancient stone-house now stands is supposed to be the exact spot where Lohiau’s stood. Not far from it, about three or four hundred yards inland, are the wonderful caves of Kanaloa and Kapalae, whose strange waters have mystified the Hawaiians since the days of Papa and Wakea.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 12/5/1892, p. 3)

A RELIC UNEARTHED.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XVI, Number 3244, Page 3. December 5, 1892.

The appearance of the lost hale of Lohiau in Haena, 1892.

THAT AMAZING STONE BUILDING

Some people from Kilauea, Kauai, when they heard that that ancient stone house of Lohiau in Haena was dug up by the sea and visible, they went immediately on Sunday, the 4th of this month to witness one of the famous ancient places of Kauai. However, they were dumbfounded that the stone structure was reburied by the sea after being visible for but a short week.

The kamaaina of Haena pointed out where they saw that relic, however, none of them was willing to attempt to dig it up again. Because they saw that it was a massive rock, and its size was fantastic, and that it would be a feat for them to re-raise that rock; this would only be possible with a huge amount of people, and that is why they thought that; or perhaps, that this was a magical occurrence, and just as its appearance was wondrous, so too was its disappearance.

[It is unfortunate that there are no digital images of this important newspaper available online yet.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 12/15/1892, p.2)

KELA HALE POHAKU KAMAHA'O.

Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 120, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 15, 1892.

Huge Tsunami, 1862.

[Found under: “NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

Large Tsunami [Kaikoo].—We received a letter written by Mr. E. Makaioulu of Haena, Keaau, Puna, Hawaii, on this past 29th of January, telling of the great tsunami at that place on the night of the 29th [28th] of that same month, and this is what he said.

“On the night of the 28th of this past January, an enormous kaikoo was seen in Keaau, Puna, Hawaii; it was a very big kaikoo with accompanying winds from the west, and the ocean was covered over with black rain clouds. The waves pounded and reached the barren plains high up inland, and the government road was smashed, as well as the fishpond of Keaau loa. The pounding of the ocean was like that of Egypt in the Red Sea, killing the Pharaoh and his war chariots; and we made it through those large waves in the night. We thought that is was the second Great Flood [Kai a Kahinalii] from the time of Noah, the prophet of Jehovah.”

[Anyone have more information on this fishpond?]

(Kuokoa, 2/15/1862, p. 2)

Kaikoo nui.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 12, Aoao 2. Feberuari 15, 1862.

Here you’d be looking at a long strings of @@@@@@@@@ instead of information on Queen Kapiolani and Puna. 1876.

NEWS ITEMS FROM PUNA.

Please let us shake hands, your Captain and I, and insert my small contribution in an empty space of your delicate body.

On the evening of the 12th of Nov., Queen Kapiolani and her younger sister Kapooloku, Hon. L. Kaina, and the other companions of the Queen left Hilo Hanakahi and the Kanilehua rain. And the land travelling canoes that evening were pointed towards the seas of the rustling pandanus groves, and they reposed at the home of R. Lyman, Esq., along with the woman who lives in the sea of Haena in Keaau.

And the next morning, the entourage of the Queen travelled on to see the sounding pebbles of Aalamanu, and from there, to Keauhou and the shelter of coconut fronds. And aloha was shown between the Queen and her humble subjects.

And here the Queen asked for someone to take them to see the Waikoolihilihi and and the tall Hopoe Lehua, and the writer of this article patiently took them. We saw the hollow pahoehoe [uha pahoehoe?] of Hopoe, and inhaled the lima [?] and the seaweed growing upon it. And we soon looked upon the famous pool Ka Wai Koolihilihi; but there was no water in the pool as it was sucked up by the heat of the sun, for it has been months of nice weather here in Puna; there was no water to drink. There too were the lehua @@@@
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When you look at the works reported by the church officials accomplished in their districts, the work of the Lord has progressed in some places but regressed in others. As for the pastor himself, the father’s work has been deft, there is nothing to fault, there is no obscene names to apply, his actions before his flock has been lively; and during the late evening hours of the day mentioned above, the meeting was adjourned. This group will meet again at Olaa on the 2nd of January, 1877. The church officials were hosted well at the home of Kalahiki with food for the body, and the aloha given by the locals was splendid. S. K. Po-opio

Keaau, Puna, H., Nov. 27, 1876.

[This paper was not typed from the unclear images available online, but from the originals. So luckily, all of those @@@@@@@@@@ portions have been transcribed and are available online. Still, it would still be worth getting the best images even of these pages, so that the typescript can be compared to the original for questionable phrases.

Now consider all of thousands of pages of newspaper with bad images that are being typescripted today. Now is the time to take clear images of them. Before typescripts are done. Why do double or triple the work? And perhaps more important, why risk having the pages touched again and again by people wanting to know what this @@@@ and that @@@@ are… Once the papers fall apart, it will be too late.]

(Lahui Hawaii, 12/21/1876, p. 2)

HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O PUNA.

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke II, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 21, 1876

Hula Critique, 1875.

Hula of Haena.

O Lahui Hawaii; Aloha to you:—

While living here in the village of Haena, gazing at the cliff faces of Makana, and enjoying the softly blowing winds of the land, and reveling in the leaves of the kawelu grass; what I am fond of is the beautifully breaking waves, those companion waves which Lohiau surfed in days past, in our old stories. Then I see men, women, and children of this unfamiliar land in which I live, parading to the hula house. How dismaying! O Haena—don’t agonize, but think. Time now has moved forward, and here you are reverting backwards, and stumbling at Kanapo[?]. Here we are, the devout, seeing how truly horrifying the hula is of the people here who are going in droves down into the whirlpool, just as the saying goes, “Kohala is crowded to the very opening.” As soon as the assembly conch is blown, they run and disappear.

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.” [Mataio 11:28] And look at James 5:5. Therefore I am concerned over what was said by the prophet, Ezekiel 33:3–5. Look to this teaching.

With aloha,
D. P. Puniawa,
Haena, Kauai, Oct. 11, 1875.

(Lahui Hawaii, 10/21/1875, p. 2)

Ka Hula o Haena

Lahui Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 43, Aoao 2, Okatoba 21, 1875.