Irony, 1893.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.”]

The new Hawaiian daily paper, “La Kuokoa,” started the other day printed about 1200 copies. Out of this number only 80 copies were circulated. Such is the native Hawaiian’s love for annexation. Continue reading

La Kuokoa, 1887.

INDEPENDENCE DAY.

This coming Monday, the 28th of November, is the Independence Day of Hawaii nei, and on that day in the year 1844, recognition was received from the powers of England and France, and this is the 43rd year of our living with independence amongst the great powers of the entire world. Continue reading

A song for Hawaiian Independence Day, 1870.

La Kuokoa o Hawaii.

1. E ku kakou a olioli pu,
No ka la Kuokoa o Hawaii nei,
Ua hiki no ia kakou,
Ke haanui a haakena,
I ka pomaikai o ka lahui,
No ka la Kuokoa o ke aupuni.

He la kupanaha no  keia,
I ike ole ia mamua,
Ia Kauikeaouli me Liholiho,
Me na la mua o Kamehameha.

2. Ke ku mai nei Hawaii,
Ua hauoli na kuahiwi,
Ua haanou o Maunakea,
Ua hipahipa o Maunaloa,
Hu-lo-hu-lo o Hualalai,
No ka la Kuokoa o ke aupuni.

He la kupanaha no keia, &c., Continue reading

Death of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani, 1917.

Edward K. Lilikalani Left this Life Behind

On the Fourth of last week, Edward K. Lilikalani left this life at sixty-eight years of age at his home on 415 Queen Street, and on this Sunday his body was carried from Williams’ place [mortuary] for the cemetery of Kawaiahao where the last service will be held over his body by the kahu of Kawaiahao, H. H. Parker. Continue reading

Kalakaua, the firemen’s king! 1875.

Burning of the Ship Emerald.—At half-past two o’clock on Monday morning an alarm of fire was sounded by the watchmen in the bell-tower, which proved to be for the ship Emerald, at anchor in the roadstead. Fire brigades, about two hundred officers and men, were immediately dispatched from the Pensacola in port, which took off two or three of the patent fire extinguishers. The city firemen also turned out promptly, with their machines, hose carts and ladders, ready to assist whenever ordered. At early dawn, the ship was towed into the harbor alongside the steamboat wharf, where the firemen and engines could get access to her. The fire was first discovered soon after midnight, but when the naval force reached the ship the hole was so full of smoke that the fire extinguishers could could not be successfully applied, and little could be done towards checking the fire until the engines could be brought to bear on it. From six oʻclock, the firemen, mariners and citizens worked faithfully till after noon, when the fire was apparently subdued, and the firemen returned home. Continue reading