La Hoihoi Ea, 1843.

175 Years Ago.

nupepa

THE RESTORATION.

This day, July thirty first, one thousand eight hundred and forty-three, will hereafter be referred to, as memorable in the history of the Sandwich Islands Government. The existence of the Government has often been threatened, but it has been most signally preserved. It is easy to trace the superintending Providence of God in every stage of its advancement. Many months since persons acquainted with its condition were fully aware that a most important crisis was approaching. It was seen that if the nation continued independent favorable influences must be exerted on the other side of the world. While the most amicable negotiations were going forward, an English Man of War anchors in this harbor. Immediate hostile action was threatened unless the Government yielded to certain demands. Those having been acceded to, others more exhorbitant were forth coming. The King finding himself involved in difficulties, which were not of…

View original post 462 more words

Advertisements

Vermont hears of Restoration Day, 1843.

SANDWICH ISLANDS.

Letters from the Islands to August 5, furnish some additional particulars relating to the restoration of the native government.—The doings of Lord Paulet’s Provisional Government were outrageous, and compelled the retirement of Dr. Judd from all participation in it. The following letter is from the Boston Daily Advertiser:

U. S. Ship Constellation,
Off Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 1843.

It is probably known in the United States that in February last, his Lordship Captain George Paulet, of Her Majesty’s ship Carysfort, visit these Islands; and after urging upon King Kamehameha III., in succession, various demands, with many of which it was found impossible to comply, an making preparations to fire upon the city of Honolulu, compelled a cession of the Sovereignty to the Queen of Great Britain, and appointed a Commission of four, of which his Majesty or his deputy were permitted to be a member, for the provisional government of the Island, until her Majesty’s pleasure should be made known; which time the “existing laws, and those made at the ensuing council of the King and chiefs” were to continue in full force so far as natives were concerned,” and to for the basis of the administration of justice by the Commission between foreigns residents on these Islands, and all existing engagements of the King were to be executed and performed as if the cession had never been made.” Continue reading