On the moving of the Na-ha Stone to Hilo Library 100 years ago, and its history (5 of 6), 1915.

THE STORY OF THE NA-HA STONE

(Conclusion)

In the morning of another day, when the rays of the beautiful sun shone on Kumukahi and warmed the cold and damp earth, this young Chief of the Apaapaa winds of Kohala woke, and before taking the morning meal, they prepared for their journey to see the Naha Stone, and this journey of Kamehameha to see it was accompanied by the Chiefs of Hilo. The Chiefly Mother of the Chiefs, Ululani, also was in accompaniment, as well as her court and many of Hilo’s dignitaries. Amongst these going with the malihini Chief was Kalaniwahine, the Royal Prophet, who was escorting her hanai Chief who travelled across the sea along with her. This Prophetess was the one who instructed Kamehameha to go to Hilo to meet with his piko, the Alii in the line of High Naha Chiefs, that being Keaweokahikona, the strongest one known in those days. On this procession of Kamehameha to see the Naha Stone, Keaweokahikona also was accompanying his Chiefly Cousin, but he did not believe in the ability of Kamehameha to move the Naha Stone for it was a kapu stone of the Alii Class who had the Naha Kapu and the other lines of Alii had no rights to it; and it was this Keaweokahikona who was the only one known of who could move this Royal Pohaku.

At this time when Kamehameha folks were on the move, the Chiefly Mother of theirs spoke to him with these words: Continue reading

On the moving of the Na-ha Stone to Hilo Library 100 years ago, and its history (4 of 6), 1915.

As soon as Ululani heard these words of her children, she exited the house, and soon saw Kamehameha approaching, and that is when Ululani began a wailing call of love [uwe helu] and then she also called out the name song for Kamehameha with these words:

Au—we hoi—e, he mai hoi paha,
O oe ka ia e Kalaninuilanimehameha—a,
E hea aku ana i ka Iwa kiloulou moku la,
E komo e kuu Laninui hoi—a,
Ao i wehewehena ao i waihona—e,
Kona po o ka hoa keia—la,
A’u lei o ka ua haao hoi—e,
E lele ae la mauka o Auaulele—a,
E komo hoi paha i ka hale o Kealohalani—e,
Auau i ke kiowai kapu o Ponahakeone,
Ae inu hoi i ka awa a Kane i kanu ai i Hawaii,
A ola hoi ke kini o ke akua ia oe,
He mai hoi e kuu Laninuimehameha—a.

[Ah indeed, do come,
Might it be you, O Kalaninuilanimehameha?
I call out to the island-hooking Frigate bird,
Come in, my Heavenly Chief,
The day opens, the day closes,
In his night, this is the companion,
My lei of the Haao rains,
Soaring in the uplands of Auaulele,
Entering the home of Kealohalani,
Bathing in the sacred pool of Ponahakeone,
Drinking the awa which Kane planted in Hawaii,
The multitudes of the gods will live through you,
Come, my dear Laninuimehameha.] Continue reading

On the moving of the Na-ha Stone to Hilo Library 100 years ago, and its history (3 of 6), 1915.

THE STORY OF THE NA-HA STONE

(Continued)

“Hear me, O Alii; he has but one opponent to fight where the strength of this hanai of mine will be challenged, that is Keaweokahikona, and this is his one opponent that will thwart his strength, and who will also thwart the strength of his young experts in spear throwing, making it into nothing. I say before you all, O high Chiefs of the land, he must go see this relative of his, for he [Keaweokahikona] is his own blood relative [piko], and should he [Keaweokahikona] decide to follow him, then there will be no more difficulties and they will live as leader and follower from here forth. But he must go quickly and not put it off until the time they should meet has past.

When the alii living in the court of Kalaniopuu heard this, they all approved of this idea of this Prophet Chiefess Kalaniwahine. The days were soon spent preparing for the journey of Kamehameha Paiea to see his cousin Keaweokahikona, and to visit the Naha Stone in the front of Pinao Heiau. The canoes of the young chief Kamehameha were set forth, and they were escorted by a number of high chiefs, they being Naihe and Kalaninuimakolukolu, and these travels of the young chief was accompanied by grace with the seas being calm and the three mountains of Great Hawaii of Keawe were clear.

When the canoes landed at Hilo Hanakahi, they first came ashore at Nukuokamanu [Kanukuokamanu], and as soon as the prow of the canoe rumbled against the sand of Hilo Hanakahi, Naihe folks disembarked first and headed straight for the house of the High Chiefess Ululani; the news had reached the Chiefess Ululani in advance and she called out to Naihe with these words:

“Ha! Hey, my relatives have arrived. What is the reason for your taking this trip across the wide sea?”

At this time her children responded: “Your child is arriving, that is Kalaninuilanimehamehaikamakaohaloa. This is a voyage of that Heavenly Chief to seek a mother, and that is why I appear before you.”

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/16/1915, p. 2)

KA MOOLELO O NA-HA POHAKU

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 10, Helu 28, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 16, 1915.

On the moving of the Na-ha Stone to Hilo Library 100 years ago, and its history (1 of 6), 1915.

THE STORY OF THE NA-HA STONE

These passing days, the Board of Trade of Hilo [Papa o ka Hui Kalepa o Hilo] is considering moving the Naha Stone [Na-ha Pohaku] from where it now is placed and putting it by the Library of the Hilo Town, and the Editor of the Hoku o Hawaii [S. L. Desha] was asked to tell of some things pertaining to this Royal Stone, and which were contained in the old history of this land, and that will become something for the Natives of this land to understand things about the history of this Birth Stone of the Alii of the Naha Class.

The Naha Stone spoken of in this story is the great Pohaku that is lies in Piihonua in Hilo Town on the Hilo side of Waianuenue Avenue, and is in front of the first house foundation of Governor Kipi of Hilo, and that place is named after an old Heiau called “Pinao.”

In the history of this Royal Stone, it is said that the Pohaku was brought from the Wailua River on Kauai, and it was brought upon double-hulled canoes, and it was brought by a high Chief of long ago named MAKALIINUIKUAKAWALE (m), and this pohaku was brought as a sign of chiefly births and this Pohaku Alii was placed before the Pinao Heiau. Continue reading