Contemporary reactions to “Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen”? 1898.

There was a question posed as to what sort of reaction the Hawaiian-language translation of “Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen” was getting. What indeed were the people saying about it and the book in general in the “Aloha Aina” and the other papers, both Hawaiian and English (as well as in the papers outside of Hawaii)?

Now that might be a nice Master’s thesis, or perhaps someone receiving funding might consider this as a project for which to do in-depth research! Any takers?

[In the new edition of “Hawaii’s Story,” see also David Forbes’ introduction for coverage on this topic.]

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Wakeke Heleluhe to take the place of Kia Kahele Nahaolelua, 1897.

Returning Home.

It is heard that Mrs. Kahele Nahaolelua is returning on the steamer Monowai this coming Thursday and left behind the Queen [Aliiaimoku]. The reason for this return is unclear to us, however, there are all sorts of rumors; some say she is sick, some say that she misses her family, some say that she has urgent business, and so forth; the truth will be known only when she returns. And because she is coming home, in her stead will be Mrs. Wakeke Heleluhe, who will leave on the steamship Australia of this coming Wednesday. Her departure is certain, for her wardrobe is being made for her trip to foreign lands. So this is a confirmation of the truth of Captain Palmer’s words that it is unclear when the Queen will return and her stay there is not limited.

[The Queen states:

In the early part of May it became necessary for my companion, Mrs. Kia Nahaolelua, to return to Honolulu. Three months was the length of time I had expected to be absent when I asked her to accompany me; but five months had passed away, and her husband and large family of children needed her. So I sent her to San Francisco under the charge of Captain Palmer, where he was to meet Mrs. Joseph Heleluhe, and conduct her to Washington.

See another article on Mrs. Heleluhe’s departure.]

(Makaainana, 5/3/1897, p. 8)

E Huli Hoi Mai Ana.

Ka Makaainana, Buke VII—-Ano Hou, Helu 18, Aoao 8. Mei 3, 1897.

Wakeke Ululani Heleluhe passes away, 1921.

QUEEN LILIU’S TRAVEL COMPANION DIES.

After being ill for some time, Mrs. Wakeke Ululani grew weary of this life, at six in the evening of this past Monday [11/21/1921], at her home on 13th Avenue in Kaimuki, being eighty or so years old.

Mrs. Wakeke Ululani Heleluhe was born on Maui, however, for thirty years, she was a companion to Queen Liliuokalani, from the Queen’s young days, until Liliu passed on.

In the last days of the Queen’s life, Mrs. Heleluhe was constantly before her, watching over her care, just as the days when Liliu was reigning as monarch of Hawaii nei, and everywhere that the Queen went, she went as well.

Once when the Queen went to Washington, Mrs. Heleluhe was in her retinue.

Mrs. Wakeke Heleluhe was a member of the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu]. Her husband, Joe Heleluhe, who passed long ago, was the Queen’s secretary during her reign.

Surviving her is a son and daughter of theirs; the son, Jack Heleluhe, is working in America singing, and when the steamship Hawkeye State arrived in Honolulu some weeks ago, he was one of the people on the ship, on his way to Baltimore.

As for the daughter, Mrs. Myra Iona, she is one of the women who attended Queen Liliu while she was living, and she went along twice with the Queen to Washington.

At 3:30 in the afternoon of this past Tuesday, her funeral was held, from William’s Mortuary her earthly body was laid to rest at the cemetery in Kamoiliili.

[The Queen writes of her stay in Washington D. C. in 1897:

“In the early part of May it became necessary for my companion, Mrs. Kia Nahaolelua, to return to Honolulu. Three months was the length of time I had expected to be absent when I asked her to accompany me; but five months had passed away, and her husband and large family of children needed her. So I sent her to San Francisco under the charge of Captain Palmer, where he was to meet Mrs. Joseph Heleluhe, and conduct her to Washington.”

The Mrs. Joseph Heleluhe sent for here is Wakeke Ululani Heleluhe.]

(Kuokoa, 11/25/1921, p. 4)

MAKE KA HOAHELE O KA MOIWAHINE LILIU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIX, Helu 47, Aoao 4. Novemaba 25, 1921.