Papa holua found in Hookena by Napoleon Kalolii Pukui, 1905.

SLED OF A CHIEFESS

On the 6th of last month, N. K. Pukui, traveling agent of the Hawaiian Realty and Maturity Co., while on a tour of the Island of Hawaii, found the above illustrated sled in a cave at Hookena, Hawaii.

It is said that the oldest kamaainas of Hookena have heard from their parents and grandparents that sometime in the reign of King Keawenuiaumi, about two hundred and fifty years ago, a high chiefess named Kaneamuna [Kaneamama] was the living at Hookena. Her principal amusement was hee holua (coasting on a sled) and hee nalu (surfing).

She had her people make a sliding ground for her on a hill just back of the little village of Hookena, and ordered a sled, or land toboggan, called a papa holua, as well as a surfing board, or a papa hee nalu. When the slide was finished she passed many pleasant hours sliding down the steep hill. This slide was composed of smooth stones covered with rushes. After her death her sled and surf board disappeared, and the secred of their hiding place was never revealed.

It is believed the sled and board found in the cave belonged to the High Chiefess. They are made of the wood of the bread-fruit tree and at the present time are in very good condition. The cocoanut fiber ropes are still attached to the sled.

(Advertiser Photo.)

ANCIENT HAWAIIAN SLED FOUND IN A KONA, HAWAII, CAVE.

[See also the Hawaiian-Language article found in Ka Na’i Aupuni, 12/6/1905, p. 2.]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 12/6/1905, p. 5)

SLED OF A CHIEFESS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLII, Number 7279, Page 5. December 6, 1905.

Fishpond and fish and the court, 1915.

Court Holds Fish Don’t Go With Pond

Famous Molokai Fish Pond Case Passed on by Supreme Court—Decision Raises New Questions.

What’s fish pasture worth?

This is a question which Attorney Dan Case is trying to have answered, because on behalf of a client he will probably soon be putting in a bill against Attorney Eugene Murphy for a goodly sum for the care of Murphy’s finny property in a certain pond on Molokai. It is the famous fish pond case again.

The question has been brought up through a supreme court decision, rendered this week, in which the court apparently holds that when a man sells a fish pond he doesn’t necessarily sell the fish that may be in it. About six months ago a Japanese named Kanayama bought at sheriff’s sale the lease on the fish pond in question, only to be sued a little later for damages because he had taken fish from the pond. The suit was filed by Murphy, attorney for Akutogawa [Akutagawa], the Japanese who previously owned the lease, and who had given his attorney a bill of sale on the fish in the pond.

In the district magistrate’s court, judgement was rendered against Murphy, but on his appeal to the supreme court, this is reversed. The syllabus of the opinion of the higher court read:—”The judgement is reversed and the cause remanded to the district magistrate of Molokai with instructions to enter judgement in favor of the plaintiff for the sum of $75 and costs.”

The question is now what Murphy purposes doing to get his fish, which presumably are trespassing in the pond, and also what bill for pasture the owner of the pond can collect for caring for them all this time. And the end is not yet.

(Maui News, 7/24/1915, p. 6)

Court Holds Fish Don't Go With Pond

The Maui News, Volume XXII, Number 22, Page 6. July 24, 1915.

Wailuku and Lahaina get new marketplace, 1880.

Wailuku will soon have a market-place, and so will Lahaina. Each town has $2,000 appropriated for the purpose. His Excellency Governor Dominis gives his attention to the erection of these useful structures. The fish-market of Lahaina is sometimes more varied and abundant than that of Honolulu. The mullet ponds of Molokai furnish inexhaustible supplies of fish; and the coast and bays of Lanai could supply a great city with crawfish, crustacea, and bivalves of various kinds, and with turtle in exceptional quantities. We have noticed the terrapin brought to Lahaina. The Makawao district will supply the Wailuku market with an abundance of choice beef and mutton. The large and commodious markets at both towns will, no doubt, contribute to the increase and greater variety of supplies.

[Wow, this article has so much varied information: on government spending, fish supply, fish ponds, ranching, &c., &c., &c.]

(Wednesday Express, 9/8/1880, p. 1)

Wailuku will soon have a market-place...

The Wednesday Express, Volume I, Number 1, Page 1. September 8, 1880.