Then from 2/19/1881, “Ko Hawaii Pae Aina” started printing list after list after list of reported cases of smallpox and deaths as a result thereof. 1881.

Reported Cases of Smallpox.

We place below the list of all people who contracted Smallpox and was known to the Board of Health—beginning on the 4th of December 1880, until this past 17th of February 1881:
Dec. 4—Amosalson, from the steamship Australia.
Dec. 10—White, from the steamship Australia.
Dec. 25—Chow Fork, from the steamship Cassandra.
Jan. 3—Gee Sam, from the steamship Cassandra.
Jan. 19—Tah Tin, from the steamship Quinta.
Jan. 24—Cheong Hoy, from the steamship Quinta.
Feb. 2—Chan Pou, Ho Kau, He Sang, Chou Fa, Wong Neet, Su Wah, Tuen Kam, all from the steamship Mei Foo.
Feb. 4—Keawe (female), from Kaopuaua.
Feb. 5—Lono, from Kepohoni; Kealoha (f), from Kaumakapili; Kamala, from Honokaupu; Kaeo, from the grounds of Queen Emma; Wahinelili (f), from Kikihale; Sam Kalalau, Piimoku, Akowana, Kini (f), Kakeo (f), and Kepola (f), from Kaopuaua; Ieke and Nahuina, of Kikihale.
Feb. 6—Pua, from the grounds of Queen Emma; Eliza Crowningburg, from Kikihale; Maikai, Ioba, and Kalamimea (f), from Kaopuaua.
Feb. 7—Paapaina and Hookano, from Honokaupu; Nakaa (f), from Kepohoni; Kaliko (f), from Kaopuaua; G. Lucas, Jr., from Kukui Street; Gibbs, from Queen’s Hospital; Piimoku (f), from Pualoalo; Kahopu (f), from Hamohamo; Namakalele (f), from Kalihi; Amoe (f), from Kalihi Waena.
Feb. 8—Leon Dejean, from Hotel Street; Kane, from Beritania Street; Kamohomoho, from Kahapaakai; Eliza Lucas, from Kukui Street; Hattie Akau, from Beritania Street.
Feb. 9—Miss Saxton, from Hotel Street; Kuanalewa, from Pauoa; Makaimi, from Kepohoni.
Feb. 10—Chinese girl, Kaneohe; Awai, Kailua; Nellie Solomon (f), Kapuukolo; Namahana (f), Kulaokahua. Feb. 11. Jas. Veltman, Beritania Street; Mahoe, grounds of Queen Emma; Kana, Waipio, Ewa; —————, Waimalu, Ewa; Kailianu, Kaumakapili. Feb. 12. Poaimoku, Kepohoni; Hao, Schooner Pauahi. Feb. 13. —————, Waipio, Ewa; Wahinekua (f), Waipake, Kauai; Feb. 14. Kapahi, Waikiki; Ane Nawahineelua, Kikihale. Feb. 15. Ah Chou, from the Chinese steamship Septima; Ah Chung, from the same vessel. Feb. 16. Sam Fong, Ah Fat, from that Chinese steamship. Feb. 17—D. W. Aiwohi, from Kamakela; Kaaea (f), from Kepohoni; Nailima (m), and Kahikona (f), from the grounds of Queen Emma; 1 Chinese, from the steamship Septima.
There are two patients reported from Waianae, one Chinese and one Hawaiian, but we don’t have their names.
From amongst those who came down with the illness, 9 died—2 haole died by suicide [make naauaua?], 1 Chinese, and 6 Hawaiians. The rest are under quarantine.
(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 2/19/1881, p. 2)
NA MAI HEBERA I LOHE IA MAI.

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 8, Aoao 1. Feberuari 19, 1881.

More on smallpox outbreak, 1881.

The Killer “Bumpy Disease” in Honolulu.

The scary killer disease of 1853 has appeared once again within this town, and has spread its roots throughout the Kona district in no time. We are in possession of the list of the sick, from the 4th of December 1880 up until yesterday, and the total reached 53. Seven of them are haole, 12 are Chinese, and the rest are all Hawaiians. One haole died of the illness, and one hung himself. Just one Hawaiian has died, Lilia Keawe, a hapa haole.

We strongly urge, in the case where one of you is afflicted, O People of Honolulu, to quickly make it known at the prison, and the government will treat you at no cost. Do not try to conceal it, or it will become an epidemic.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 2/12/1881, p. 2)

KA MAI PUUPUU LUKU MA HONOLULU

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 7, Aoao 2. Feberuari 12, 1881.

More on smallpox vaccination, 1881.

Announcement from the Board of Health on Vaccination.

Let it be known to everyone that at 10 in the morning on Monday of next week, that being the 24th of January, vaccinations will take place again at the Protestant Church in Waikiki Kai. Therefore, everyone who got vaccinated last Monday should go there to receive their clearance papers, and also those of Waikiki who were not previously vaccinated.

And at 12 noon of that same day, vaccinations will begin at the Protestant church at Kamoiliili.

Therefore, everyone who has not gotten vaccinated should go there, from Punahou, Manoa, Palolo, Waikiki Uka, and Waikiki Waena, as well as Waialae and Niu; there you will receive the vaccination at no cost for all children and adults who were not previously vaccinated. Be vigilant, O People, and come down; for this is the means by which you will escape the devastating disease, smallpox.

N. B. Emerson,
Head of Vaccination for Oahu.
Honolulu, Jan. 13, 1881.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 1/22/1881, p. 2)

HOOLAHA A KA PAPA OLA NO KA OLIMA ANA

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 4, Aoao 2. Ianuari 22, 1881.

Wow… Could this be the beginnings of the smallpox epidemic? 1881.

It is a shocking thing, what the Board of Health was seen doing these days. When the steamship, the “City of New York,” arrived from San Francisco, where smallpox was spread, the passengers up front were quarantined, but the passengers from the back, the wealthy people, were allowed to come ashore without being quarantined. When the ship came to the dock, those on shore were forbidden to approach it. Because of the Board of Health’s unequal quarantine, the passengers from the front rejected the quarantine orders, and the rules of the Board of Health were useless.

Now that the people know full well of this act, it is quite clear that the time has come for this Board of Health to be denounced by all people of the nation, and what is left for the members to do is to leave this which is beyond their abilities for the good of the Hawaiian Nation.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 1/1/1881, p. 2)

He mea kupanaha...

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Ianuari 1, 1881.