Konia’s kanikau for Paki, 1855.

HE KANIKAU NO A. PAKI.

Kuu kane kaikunane ke aloha,
Mai ko maua wa uuku ka noho ana a hiki i keia manawa,
Aole hoi a’u kane, aole ana wahine,
Oia ko kaua noho ana a hele aku la oe,
Ke kanikau nei au me na keiki a kaua i ko aloha,
He aloha ia oe, e Kuhooheiheipahu,
Auwe no hoi kuu kaikunane mai ka makani o Lele he Maaa,
Mai na ale hulilua o Pailolo,
Ua hele o Kalanihelemailuna i ka hora eha i ka wanaao,
Ua haalele mai nei i ka pili a maua,
Kuu hoa no hoi o ka aina pilikia a kakou i ike ai,
Oia hoi ke Kaona nui ma Honolulu nei,
Ua hele hoi oe me ka makaukau,
Noho au me ka hemahema,
He kaumaha he luuluu he pilikia keia e noho nei,
Noho aku la oe i ka nani mau loa,
A kaua i huli ai me na keiki a kaua,
Uwe helu mai kana kaikamahine o Kalohelani,
Auwe no hoi kuu Makuakane leo ole—a,
Na’u ka olelo malaila wale mai no ia,
Aole no e pau ko’u kanikau ana ia oe no ko makou makua ole—a,
Ua paumako makou i ke aloha ia oe e ka Makua,
I ka make koke ana’ku nei—a,—
Aka o ka ne a ke Keiki Makua, aole ia L.

L. Konia.

(Elele E, 6/16/1855, p. 20)

HE KANIKAU NO A. PAKI.

Ka Elele E, Buke 10, Aoao 20. Iune 16, 1855.

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Lucy Kaheiheimalie Peabody Henriques has gone on, 1928.

MUCH ALOHA FOR THAT ALII WHO WAS FULL OF ALOHA

That chiefess born of the land, Mrs. Lucy Kaheiheimalie Peabody Henriques has gone. She was loved by all of us, and she was a precious one among the people. She was going silently away these past weeks. Aloha with unending tears. She went to see the sacred bosom of Kane. The rejected flowers were strewn at Wailua [?? Ua ahu iho la na pua wahawaha i Wailua]; she left grieving behind, her beloved lei, her daughter, Kalanikiekie Henriques. Continue reading

Queen Emma returns to Hawaii, 1866.

About Queen Emma Lani.

We extend aloha to Queen Kaleleonalani with her safe return to her birth sands, and to the bosoms of her makaainana and the makaainana of her Chief one who has departed.

We give our thanks to Almighty God for lovingly watching over and guiding her, on her voyage over the ocean and the great lands of the Earth. And for the giving of kind and loving receptions in all places she went, in Royal courts as well as amongst the commoners.

We are pleased with the joy of their Highnesses, the Alii, the Kaukau Alii, and all of the Honorable ones of this Archipelago at the return of this Royal Descendant of Hawaii nei.

We are pleased as well along with all the makaainana of the Entire Nation, at seeing once again her face.

Along with this joy is also some sadness and grief for the taking of Her Royal Sister-in-Law [Kaikoeke Lani],¹ and her Foster Mother [Makuahine Hanai].² We remember this, and we ask of the Benevolent God to envelope in the protection of His Aloha, all who are grieving because of their aloha for those who have departed.

¹Victoria Kalohelani Kamamalu Kaahumanu (11/1/1838–5/29/1866)

²Grace Kamaikui Ruka [Rooke] (1808–7/24/1866)

(Kuokoa, 10/27/1866, p. 2)

No ka Moi Wahine Emma Lani.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 43, Aoao 2. Okatoba 27, 1866.

History of the Hawaiian Flag. 1862.

“The Beautiful Flag of Hawaii,
Let it forever wave.”

The Hawaiian Flag

We are pleased and happy about the Hawaiian Flag printed above, and the people subscribing to Ka Nupepa Kuokoa will be delighted to see it. We display the Flag, urged to do so by our great aloha for our King, Queen, and Ka Haku o Hawaii, their son, as well as for our Nation. The love by the people for their flag of their country is customary, and when they see her fluttering, it fills their hearts with joy.

The printing of the Flag in a Newspaper is something new, along with the displaying of its colors*. This is something not done previously here, as well as in some foreign countries. Perhaps our friends will inquire as to who did this work. Some Hawaiians did the work, people from this Archipelago, and they were taught to do this in our Printing Office. Here is how it was done: Woodblocks were carved in the fashion of the flag using two blocks. When it was printed, first the blue was printed, allowed to set, then the red was printed. This printing was done solely by Hawaiians. Such is the intelligence of the kanaka maoli, and that is how we recognize it. If we are instructed to do any task under the sun, Hawaiians can do the same as the white-skinned people.

If you should want to see this, you should support Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, and urge your acquaintances and friends to pay the two dollars a year. If you would kindly help, you will see many things that will gladden and instruct you.

You, O fluttering Flag,
The proud blossom of Hawaii.
Established by Kamehameha the great,
With Spear in hand, with strength,
Flutter over Hawaii and Niihau, and give protection.
Beneath your wings,
So that the peace of Hawaii be known,
By her King and the people as well.
The cross on your crest that Britain holds dear,
The Nations of Europe also give acclaim,
You are the Flag of old,
The time of Kamehameha the great,
The bravest warrior of Hawaii,
He who joined the islands,
With unity from end to end,
Living as one in contentment,
Along with the Spear upon which he erected,
The steadfast Nation of Hawaii.
We rejoice, and rejoice for all time,
His famed accomplishments,
You wave there above,
The crown of Iolani, the king
While giving shelter,
To Emma, the Queen.
Along with Ka Haku o Hawaii.
The Royal child of Iolani and Emma,
And Kalohelani, the Regent, Victoria Kamamalu.
The loving aunt of the young lord, Prince Albert,
Do remember his His Highness, Lot Kapuaiwa,
Cleansing the fruit of the pandanus in the sea,
Your fluttering has garnered
The peace that allowed us to seek,
The knowledge that has come,
To the Hawaiian populace.
That year long ago.
You were taken from your proper place.
Not a year passed,
You were raised by the loving hands of Admiral Thomas.
The one you fondly recall,
On the day of his death when it approaches,
You will wave there, O beautiful Flag.
O symbol of Hawaii’s Independence ;
Here is your body, being brought.
Before your beloved people,
By the Newspaper called,
Ka Nupepa Kuokoa of Hawaii,
The Excellence of your Nation.
A garment that adorns the Hawaiian People,
Wave forever.
Over the beloved sea of Mamala,
We, Hawaii, will cherish always,
The eternal glory of thy name.
The Hawaiian Flag! The Hawaiian Flag!!
The Flag of the Islands of Kamehameha IV.

This Flag was first designed in the year 1816 for Kamehameha I.

The King, wanting a ship to sail to China to sell Sandalwood, searched along with John Young, Isaac Davis, and Captain Alexander Adams of Kalihi, who is still living, for a Flag for the ship. It was a man-o-war, called the Forrester, carrying sixteen guns. Kamehameha I owned the ship.

When the Flag was completed, the ship sailed to Macao. The Flag was puzzled over, and was not accepted as a National Flag. The ship was charged exorbitantly for harbor fees, the Sandalwood was sold for a loss, and the ship returned to Hawaii.

The King learned of this loss, and he said that a tax should be placed on the harbor of Honolulu like those of foreign lands. That is when duty was first charged for the harbor.

In 1843, the 25th of February, this Flag was taken down by Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki], with the intent that this Archipelago be taken as a possession of Great Britain. The British flag was raised on flag poles all around the land, until the 31st of July of that year.

It was Admiral Thomas who restored the Flag, for he disputed the actions of Lord George Paulet.

[Notice the English column to the left, which gives a translation of the Hawaiian. It seems this issue of the Kuokoa was sent to home by many a missionary, to show the progress they were making…

*A word of clarification: This is not the first time color appears in a newspaper. For more on this topic, see Hana Hou Magazine, August/September 2011: “Read All About It!” by Ron Williams.

For more flag articles, just click here!]

(Kuokoa, 1/1/1862, p. 1)

"Ka Hae Nani o Hawaii...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Ianuari 1, 1862.