Mele for the Claudine, the vessel that carried the commission of annexationists to Washington DC, 1893.

KELAUDINA SONG.

Kaulana mai nei Kelaudina
Ahailono o ka poe pakaha
Nau i lawe aku na komisina
O ke aupuni kuloko o Hawaii
Hopuhopualulu e ka hele’na
A na elele o ua aupuni nei
E ake ana e hookoia
Ka iini pakaha aina
Halawai aku nei lakou
Me kahi paele a Kalivilana Continue reading

E o, e Ka Walu o Na Lani! 1875.

Birthday of the Princess Liliu.

This past Thursday, September 2, made the thirty-seventh year of Her Highness, the Princess for whom is this kahoahoa:

O Liliu o Loloku
O Walania i ke kii onohi
O ka onohi o Kalani Nui
Ke ka Hiwauli o Ku
O Kamakaeha o Kina.

She was born at Mana, Manamana, Honolulu, on September 2, 1838, a royal daughter of Caisara Kapaakea and A. Keohokalole and she was a younger sibling of the Alii, King Kalakaua. Continue reading

Pāʻū riding a hundred ten years ago and more, 1906.

PA-U PARADE ON MONDAY

The Riders Expect to Have a Very Big Turnout.

The Association of Pa-u Riders, otherwise known as the Hui Holopa-u Maile Alii, is making great preparations for its parade of Pa-u riders on Monday, June 11. This society formed by Mrs. Kaimana [Kainana] Puahi and others interested in the preservation of the old Hawaiian manner of horseback riding with the picturesque pa-u immediately following the floral parade of Washington’s birthday, of which parade the pa-u riders formed one of the most attractive features. The ladies have since devoted much time to practice, and to the making of appropriate dresses, and have been helped by the members of the Promotion Committee, by Manager Charles Crane of the Hawaiian Gazette Co. and by many others, to all of whom the members of the Hui Holopa-u Maile Alii wish to return their most sincere thanks.

OBSERVATIONS OF THE DAY.

The program for the day is most complete. At 6:30 in the morning, the members of the hui will meet at the Waikiki residence of Mrs. Puahi, at which time all will don the pa-u. At eight o’clock the line will begin to form, Sheriff A. M. Brown being the marshal of the parade. At 8:30 the procession will move to the Kapahulu road, thence to Beretania street, thence to Washington place. Continue reading

Pāʻū riding for Kamehameha Day a hundred and ten years ago! 1906.

PA-U RIDERS HONOR DAY

Picturesque Cavalcade Revives Old-Time Custom.

The Hui Holopa-u Maile Alii have every reason to be satisfied with their first parade as a society, which occurred yesterday in celebration of Kamehameha Day.

The custom of pa-u riding is an old and kingly one and it was eminently fitting that the initial gathering of the club should take place on the anniversary of the birth of Hawaii’s greatest king.

About 30 riders gathered at the residence of Mrs. Kainana Puahi at Waikiki early yesterday morning. The costumes, which were uniform, consisted of yellow skirts, white waists, and straw hats encircled with ilima leis. Each rider wore a black ribbon as a sash, bearing the word “Kaonohiokala,” done in gold. The word means “the eye of the sun.” Continue reading

Fishing rights to Hamohamo leased by Auwae, 1895.

FISHING RESTRICTED

Whereas I have received the lease to the fishing rights for the seas of Queen Liliuokalani located at Waikiki Kai, that being the fishing area of Hamohamo on the makai side of where the Calvinist Church stands, then going east until the border of Kaneloa, to the seas called Niau, I therefore restrict Octopus [Hee]; but as for the other fish, they are open to all others. Therefore, abide by this or you will be in trouble.

Auwae.

Waikiki Kai, Oct. 28, 1895.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 12/13/1895, p. 4)

LOKL_12_13_1895_4.png

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 1356, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 13, 1895.

Kapu on Queen Liliuokalani’s ocean at Hamohamo, 1906.

Proclamation of Prohibition!

ANNOUNCING so that all may hear who go swimming or fishing perhaps at the Sea of Hamohamo at Waikiki Kai, Honolulu, Oahu; Queen Liliuokalani prohibits: There is to be no collecting of Pakeleawaa Seaweed, and Huluhuluwaena Seaweed, Opihi, Alealea Shellfish, Ina, Haueue [Haukeuke], and Pipipi, facing the front of the Royal Yard [Pa Alii]. It was her very own Royal hands which planted and fostered all of those things mentioned above, and those who take these Restricted things will be arrested and punished by the law. All of these things planted by the Queen, some were brought from Hilo, and some from Lahaina, some from Molokai, some from Kauai, and some were from here in Waialua, Oahu.

Heed this Restriction.

J. O. Carter, Agent.

Honolulu, T. H., Mar. 1, 1906.

(Na’i Aupuni, 3/26/1906, p. 3)

NaiAupuni_3_26_1906_3.png

Ka Na’i Aupuni, Buke I, Helu 102, Aoao 3. Maraki 26, 1906.