Joseph Kapaeau Aea passes on, 1911.

JOSEPH AEA PASSES AWAY

Joseph Aea, agent of Her Majesty Liliuokalani, died last evening about ten o’clock at his home in Pauoa. He had been associated with the queen’s family for many years. He leaves a widow and two sons. One of them is the protege of Queen Liliuokalani and is also the stenographer and assistant clerk in the city clerk’s office.

Joseph Aea was for many years connected with the old Royal Hawaiian band. He was the solo viol player and was an excellent musician. He became attached to the household of Queen Liliuokalani, and attended Liliuokalani when she was one of the official guests at the jubilee of Queen Victoria in London. He also attended the queen when she visited Washington in 1903. His wife was also one of the queen’s closest personal attendants, and has been particularly attentive to her since the overthrow of the monarchy.

In 1907, upon the death of Hon. J. O. Carter, Liliuokalani appointed Mr. Aea as her business agent, but the Liliuokalani Trust, formed about two years ago, transferred this important office to Col. C. P. Iaukea, who is one of the trustees under the Liliuokalani Trust.

Aea was a delegate to the Democratic territorial convention in 1900, and was nominated for the legislature by the Home Rulers in 1902, and again in 1904, by the Democrats.

(Hawaiian Star, 1/26/1911, p. 7)

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Hawaiian Star, Volume XVIII, Number 5866, Page 7. January 26, 1911.

Queen Liliuokalani attends historical play at Kapiolani Park, 1916.

THE PRESENTATION AT KAPIOLANI PARK ABOUT LONOIKAMAKAHIKI AND KAIKILANI WAS BEAUTIFUL

SOME SCENES THAT WERE SHOWN—(1) Kakuhihewa, King of Oahu. (2) The Alii and Kaukau Alii of King Lonoikamakahiki of Hawaii leaving the throne. (3) King Lonoikamakahiki. (4) The Chiefs and Attendants in the Procession. (5) Queen Liliuokalani, and Her Companions watching the Performance. (6) The Attendants of Queen Kaikilani. (7) The Retainers of Queen Kaikilani. Continue reading

Princess Liliuokalani to make circuit of the Islands, 1881.

[Found under: “NOTES.”]

Her Royal Highness the Princess Regent will make a tour of the Islands. It was the Princess’ intention to have made this tour early in this year, but the breaking out of the small-pox and the consequent quarantine regulations prevented the plan being carried out, the Regent setting aside her own wish to travel in order to show an example of keeping the quarantine strictly. The Regent and suite will leave on August 2nd, they will visit the lava flow first and will then spend a fortnight or so in the Kohala district, about August 19th the Regent will visit Kau. The Princess Likelike will probably join her sister in Kau. The other islands of the group will be visited in turn.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 7/27/1881, p. 2)

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The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XVII, Number 30, Page 2. July 27, 1881.

Unheeded words of Talmage to the United States of America, 1894.

REV. DR. TALMAGE.

His Article Which Greatly Hurt the Missionaries Amongst Us.

The article below written by the Rev. Doctor Talmage of New York and published in a newspaper there was translated and published in the newspaper “Aloha Aina;” however,  because of the difference between our understanding of the translation and theirs, we took it and translated it once more and am putting it before our readers. Here is our translation of the said article:

Honolulu, June 18, 1894.

The chamberlain came to invite the two of us to go to the residence of the former Monarch, and had suggested 11 o’clock that morning as the best hour for our visit…

[This is what sent me looking for the article I posted earlier today. Unfortunately, the previous translation is not found online. It must have been printed in the paper, “Nupepa Aloha Aina” which ran from 1/6/1894 to 1/5/1895. The entire run is in the holdings of the Mission Children’s Society Library. This is a paper that is well worth digitizing and OCRing. I am excited to see what the translation differences could be!]

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Ka Makaainana, Buke II—Ano Hou, Helu 20, Aoao 1. Novemaba 12, 1894.
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Ka Makaainana, Buke II—Ano Hou, Helu 22, Aoao 1. Novemaba 26, 1894.

Thomas De Witt Talmage on the overthrow, 1894.

A TWO SIDED CASE.

DR. TALMAGE INVESTIGATES THE TROUBLE IN HAWAII.

The American Traveler Also Enjoys the Hospitality of the Ex-Queen and the New President—The Wife of the Latter a Most Delightful and Talented Lady.

[Copyright, Louis Kiopesch, 1894.]

Honolulu, June 18.—The chamberlain, come to invite us to the residence of the ex-queen, had suggested 11 o’clock that morning as the best hour for our visit. We approached the wide open doors through a yard of palm trees and bananas and cocoanut, and amid flowers that dyed the yard with all the colors that a tropical sun can paint. We were ushered into the royal lady’s reception room, where, surrounded by a group of distinguished persons, she arose to greet us with a cordial grasp of the hand. The pictures of her hardly convey an accurate idea of her dignity of bearing. She has all the ease of one born to high position. Her political mis-…

EX-QUEEN LILIUOKALANI.

fortunes seem in nowise to have saddened her. She spoke freely of the brightness of life to any one disposed to meet all obligations, and at my suggestion that we found in life chiefly what we look for, and if we look for flowers we find flowers, and if we look for thorns we find thorns, she remarked: “I have found in the path of life chiefly flowers. I do not see how any one surrounded by as many blessings as many of us possess could be so ungrateful as to complain.” She said it was something to be remembered thankfully that for 50 years there was no revolution in the islands. She has full faith that the provisional government is only a temporary affair, and that she will again occupy the throne.

She asked her servant to show me, as something I had not seen before, a royal adornment made up from the small bird with a large name—the Melithreptes pacifica [mamo; Drepanis pacifica]. This bird, I had read, had under its wing a single feather of very exquisite color. The queen corrected my information by saying that it was not a single feather, but a tuft of feathers from under the wing of the bird from which the adornment was fashioned into a chain of beauty for the neck. She spoke of her visit to New York, but said that prolonged illness hindered her from seeing much of the city. She talked freely and intelligently on many subjects pertaining to the present and the future.

I was delighted with her appearance and manner and do not believe one word of the wretched stuff that has been written concerning her immoralities. Defamation is so easy, and there is so much cynicism aboard, which would rather believe evil than good, that it is not to be thought strange that this queen, like all the other rulers of the earth, has been beaten with storms of obloquy and misrepresentation. George Washington was called by Tom Paine a lying impostor. Thomas Jefferson was styled an infidel, and since those times we are said to have had in the United States presidency a bloodthirsty man, a drunkard and at least two libertines, and if anybody in prominent place and effective work has escaped “let him speak, for him have I offended.” After an exchange of autographs on that day in Honolulu we parted. Continue reading

The Claudine leaves for San Francisco, 1893.

The ship Claudine [Kalaudine] left for San Francisco last night, with the Representatives of the provisional government, they being Messrs Thurston [Kakina], Charles Clark [Kale Kaaka], W. R. Castle [W. R. Kakela], and W. C. Wilder [W. C. Waila]. The Representing Commissioner for the side of the alii Liliuokalani was previously given permission to go along, but  he was denied once again.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/19/1893, p. 2)

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Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 625, Aoao 2. Ianuari 19, 1893.