In the collections of the Bishop Museum, 1903.

THE PEN WITH WHICH ROOSEVELT SIGNED THE FIRE CLAIMS BILL OF HAWAII.

Washington, Jan. 23. The pen with which the President signed the Hawaiian Fire Claims Bill [Bila Poho Ahi Hawaii] is a remarkable pen. This pen was made from the quill of a feather of a wild eagle, and that feather was taken from a war headdress of a wild Arapaho Indian. This pen is now in the care of Pratt to be placed in the Bishop Museum of Kamehameha in Honolulu.

This pen was gifted to the Hon. William A. Richards, a former Governor of Wyoming, and currently a Commissioner of Public Lands [Aina Aupuni]. This feather was taken by Richards from the headdress of an Arapaho Indian 18 years ago. He thought it was the right time for this feather to be put to some important use for Hawaii, therefore, he ordered one of the workers in his office to fashion the feather into a pen. Let it be remembered that this person who was given the feather to make a pen is a man of much seniority who was working in that office for fifty-one years.

(Aloha Aina, 2/7/1903, p. 1)

KA PENI A RUSEVALA I KAKAU AI I KA BILA POHO AHI O HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 7, 1903.

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More on the building of the Bishop Museum, 1902.

Sent to Minnesota

KOA TREES FOR THE MUSEUM.

Aboard the Clipper Ship, S. N. Castle, were taken koa trees from the two Kona [North and South Kona] for cases and other decorations for the Museum standing at the Kamehameha School. The koa trees will be taken to San Francisco and from there they will be taken aboard steam locomotive to Minnesota, and there they will be made into beautiful glass cases [ume aniani] or perhaps beautiful stairs for the planned annex for the Museum.

These koa trees were selected from places in Kona, Hawaii, and when they are fashioned, they will be fine decorations. When the idea for a new annex first came up, the lack of koa was noticed, being that only native woods were wanted for the interior. People were soon sent to the two Kona to search for koa fitting for the purpose, and when it was found, it was sent here to Honolulu. All together, the gathered lumber totals 26,000 feet. They weigh seven tons. Being that the job was given to a company in Minnesota, the koa was sent there, and from there it will return to Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 1/31/1902, p. 6)

Hoounaia no Minesota

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 5, Aoao 6. Ianuari 31, 1902.