Some of the battles of Kalaniopuu, 1866.

[Found under: “Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I.”]

The battles between Kalaniopuu, the King of Hawaii, with Kahekili, the King of Maui.

The years 1775, 1776, 1777, 1778, and 1778. Kalaniopuu went to war at Kaupo on Maui, with his Alii, his war Officers, and his soldiers. Kalaniopuu first went to war at Kaupo, and he tortured the makaainana of Kaupo by clubbing their foreheads with his war club [newa]. This battle was called Kalaehohoa [“Clubbing-of-the-Forehead”] Continue reading

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The parentage of Kalaniopuu, 1867.

[Found under: “KA MOOLELO O KAMEHAMEHA I.”]

It is said that Kalaniopuu was the child of Peleioholani, the King of Oahu, and that he was called Kalaniopuu, that being Kaleiopuu, the lei of Kualii, that is the tooth of the whale and whale ivory made smooth in the shape of a chicken spur [opuu], and that is what was the royal adornment of the alii of Oahu—this was not the case with Hawaii Island [who wore tongue-shaped lei niho palaoa]. Continue reading

Lehuanui K. Paleioholani passes on, 1916.

THAT OLD KAMAAINA PASSED AWAY.

At his residence on Liliha Street, on the afternoon of this past Tuesday, Lehuanui K. Paleioholani grew weary of this life, one of the old kamaaina of this town, at seventy-two years old.

On Wednesday afternoon his funeral was held, and his body was carried to be put to rest at the cemetery in the uplands of Puea.

Paleioholani was born in Hilo, Hawaii, on the 11th of the month of February, 1844, whereupon he witnessed the five kings who ascended to the throne of Hawaii nei, and the one queen; and he also saw the waving of the starred flag of the nation that is now governing his land of birth.

Mrs. John K. Notley is his living daughter, and the remaining descendant by that name Paleioholani.

Being that Paleioholani was a member of a number of Hawaiian associations, the members of those associations came to march along in his great procession.

[This is none other than the great historian, S. L. Peleioholani.]

(Kuokoa, 3/10/1916, p. 2)

HALA IA KAMAAINA KAHIKO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 10, Aoao 2. Maraki 10, 1916.

Keeaumoku’s ahuula, Eheukani, 1903.

FEATHER GARMENTS

106. A cloak said to have been destroyed in the conflagration caused accidentally in the attempt of the Board of Health to stamp out the bubonic plague in the Chinese quarter of Honolulu. At the time when the claims for losses caused by this great fire were presented to the Commission appointed for the purpose, my assistant, Mr. Allen M. Walcott, obtained from the claimant, Peleioholani, a carpenter by trade, the following particulars: The cloak was called “Eheukani” and was made in the time of Keeaumoku (the father of Kaahumanu) and finished shortly before the battle of Mokuohai (July, 1782) between Kamehameha and Kiwalaó. Keeaumoku’s wife gave it to Peleioholani’s grandmother. Principally mamo* feathers with a small crescent of red iiwi in each upper corner; between the shoulders a round spot of black oo feathers, from which a line of red iiwi led down to a trifle below the middle of the cloak. The cords at the neck were of human hair, an unusual thing. It must be remembered that the design (Fig. 16) as well as the following measurements are from the description given to Mr. Walcott by Peleioholani and are of course only approximate. They are worth recording as differing from any robes described. Length, about 4 feet 9 inches; neck measurment about 2 feet; circumference at bottom about 5 feet 8 inches. It is a matter of tradition that 27,000 birds were captured to furnish the feathers for this cloak. In the left side were seven spear holes that were never patched, and about which were blood stains. Keeaumoku was severely wounded in this battle, and it was rather a fancy with the old chiefs to retain the honorable scars in the ahuula, as in the cloak given by Kamehameha to Vancouver to be taken to England for King George.

*Probably oo, for a genuine mamo ahuula was devoid of any adulteration by other colored feathers. It should be stated that Peleioholani’s claim to be the owner of this cloak was disputed and it was said to have been taken from the palace years ago; but from what I have seen of the observation of natives whose duty it was to care for the royal robes, I do not believe one of them could describe the pattern of the cloaks he or she had seen for years.

[And a note on the note by Brigham. I am not sure the oo instead of mamo feathers comment should be considered true when even the great mamo feather ahuula of Kamehameha Paiea has red iiwi feathers within it…]

(Brigham, William T. Additional Notes on Hawaiian Featherwork. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, 1903. pp. 15–16.)

"Eheukani"

Brigham, William T. Additional Notes on Hawaiian Featherwork. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, 1903. p. 17.

Peleioholani’s response to the Queen? 1902.

COMPANION OF A PRINCE

A Hawaiian Chief Who Fought in Africa.

HE TELLS A ROMANTIC TALE

Decapitated Morrocan of High Rank—Was Owner of Famous Feather Cloak.

WITHIN THREE months a stalwart Hawaiian will leave Honolulu and journey to London to attend the reunion of the survivors of one of England’s wars of conquest fought more than thirty years ago. Upon the Hawaiian’s body are the scars inflicted by sword, spear and bullets, received while he was fighting under the flag of St. George in the service of Queen Victoria upon the battlefields of Southern Africa. According to a romantic story which the Hawaiian tells, few amongst the veterans who will gather in the capital of the British nation will have more honorable records for bravery and conspicuous gallantry in the face of a dark-skinned enemy than he, and few will there be whose entire lives are so wrapped in a halo of romance. Linked with this Hawaiian’s life are those of Kings and Queens, Dukes and Admirals, Generals and Captains, and yet today he is an humble resident of the Hawaiian Islands. Continue reading