Queen Liliuokalani attends historical play at Kapiolani Park, 1916.

THE PRESENTATION AT KAPIOLANI PARK ABOUT LONOIKAMAKAHIKI AND KAIKILANI WAS BEAUTIFUL

SOME SCENES THAT WERE SHOWN—(1) Kakuhihewa, King of Oahu. (2) The Alii and Kaukau Alii of King Lonoikamakahiki of Hawaii leaving the throne. (3) King Lonoikamakahiki. (4) The Chiefs and Attendants in the Procession. (5) Queen Liliuokalani, and Her Companions watching the Performance. (6) The Attendants of Queen Kaikilani. (7) The Retainers of Queen Kaikilani. Continue reading

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The beginnings of Kamehameha Schools, 1884.

Kamehameha School.

By way of the kind and generous endowment given by the Hon. Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop, she did not forget to make contributions for Schools. Amongst the heirs shown in one of our papers published earlier, she gave a sum of money to build a new schoolhouse for children with no parents or who are indigent, and the name of the school is to be Kamehameha. By this great kindness extended to help in the education of orphan and indigent children, several familiar friends of this town were recently selected as trustees and administrators pertaining to the establishing of said school, that being Charles R. Bishop, S. M. Damon, C. M. Hyde, C. M. Cooke, and W. O. Smith; and with them lies the power to build. Two schools houses are being considered to be built: one for the boarders, and one for the day school students. They are now searching for a suitable place to build the buildings. In those schools, knowledge will be taught to the children in all facets of the English language, as well as learning that will be helpful for advancement in their adult life. Here is your new place of learning, O Hawaiians who are without parents, who are indigent, and so forth. Education in this land is progressing, and therefore, “Let the life of the land live on in righteousness.”

(Kuokoa, 11/8/1884, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXIII, Helu 45, Aoao 2. Novemaba 8, 1884.

 

 

50th Anniversary of the Bana Hawaii, 1919

Pictures 1—The Hawaiian Band taken in San Francisco in 1883. 2—The band on the steps of the new Palace and the Executive Building [Hale Mana Hooko] today, taken in 1884. The new uniforms of the boys seen in this picture was sent by mistake from America to Honduras, Central America. 3—The Band lead by [Jose S.] Libornio that refused to swear under the Provisional Government in 1893. 4—The picture of J. K. Pohina [James K. Pohina], the only man left of the 26 who established the band 50 years ago, who is still with the Hawaiian Band. 5—The band at the Golden Gate, of San Francisco, at a banquet in 1895. 6—The band today at their new home on Waiakamilo Street, Kalihi. 7—The Bana Hawaii leading the parade of the Great Secret Society Knights Templars in San Francisco, August 20, 1883.

50 YEARS SINCE THE FORMATION OF THE BANA HAWAII

When Kamehameha V was ruling fifty years ago, the Hawaiian Band was established by a British man named Mr. Northcett, under orders of the King. On that day 26 young men were chosen for the band from the reformatory school of Keoneula, and the teaching of this knowledge to them was immediately began. The king had this idea first and so brass instruments were ordered earlier and they arrived here in Honolulu before he chose Mr. Northcett as the instructor to teach the boys. Continue reading

Keahualono, wahi pana of Hawaii Island, 1916.

KE AHU-A-LONO

This is the border between the two Kona districts and Kohala, and the name of this heap of rocks  [ahu pohaku] is called after Lonoikamakahiki-Kapu-a-ka-Lani, one of the high ruling chiefs of Hawaii nei who is famous in genealogical histories of the high ruling chiefs of Hawaii Island of Keawe.

When Lonoikamakahiki went with his troops and camped at this place, the Marshals [Ilamuku] built this mound of rocks and called it by the name “Ke Ahu-a-Lono,” after the name of Lonoikamakahiki, the ruling chief. That is how this pile of rocks is known until today, an unforgettable monument built by the foremost war leaders [pukaua] of Lonoikamakahiki, so that the generations of this time would remember the truly famous deeds of our forefathers who passed on; and of that sacred name Lonoikamakahiki-Kapu-a-ka-Lani. The locals of Puuanahulu are familiar with this ahu pohaku.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 2/17/1916, p. 4)

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Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 10, Helu 37, Aoao 4. Feberuari 17, 1916.

Happy Birthday, Aunty! 2016.

DON’T BE INDIFFERENT TO GOOD WORKS.

Patience Wiggin is a Japanese baby who is two years old. She was born on Kauai. There are many children in her family, and ten days after the birth of this little girl, her mother passed away. Her father is poor. After fighting with destitution and troubles, he returned the tiny girl to the Children’s Hospital, for he knew he could not care for this child.

The news was told to Miss Lucy Ward about Patience. Her job is to find homes for children like this small girl. So she began to go around searching for a home. She found Mrs. Wiggin, a Hawaiian, who wanted to adopt [hookama] a child. Mrs. Wiggin’s mind was delighted to find a baby of a different ethnicity, and welcomed in Patience. So the young girl gained a fine home and a kind mother.

The Humane Society is one of 23 associations that is provided with funds that are collected for United Welfare [Pono Lokahi] drive. This is something which promotes good will between the different ethnicities of Hawaii nei, and it will provide homes for Japanese orphans and also for children of other races.

Efforts to raise funds will begin on November 28 and continue for two days. This year the goal to be collected is $275,000, and from that sum, the Humane Society will receive $2211.

[For and earlier post, click here. And for even more on Aunty, click here.

If it wasn’t for the young girl in the story, I certainly would not be doing this blog. Hauoli la hanau e Aunty Pat! O KU O KA!!]

(Kuokoa, 11/25/1921, p. 4)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIX, Helu 47, Aoao 4. Novemaba 25, 1921.

A name song for Keelikolani, jointly composed, 1863.

NO KEELIKOLANI, MUOLAULANI KA INOA.

He anana’la i ka loa o Alakai,
Ke kuhi la he koke aku o Maunahina,
He liuliu Waialeale na ke a—nui,
He anu ka ka nahele o Aipo,
O ke kupilikii aku ia hina i Maunahina—,
Hina i ka hoona rama a ke aloha,
I ka ae hakoko a ka manao,
E pilia la i ke moe he kanaka—i—a,
He kanaka ia ua hele ia ka malama,
Hana ia iho i mio kou aloha—e—a.

Na Lilipi.

Owau e hele i ka papa o Apua,
Ke kuhi la he ale wai ko Maukele,
He pali mai hoi, Holei na ka u—a,
He ua ka ka waimaka e kulu nei,
He milimili hoi ka loko o kuu aloha—e—a,
Aloha i ka liko ohia o Puulena,
I ke-a hanu i na makani ka o lua,
Ua loa Kauonahunahu i ke a—nu,
E anu la i ka nui o ke aloha,
Ua pelepulu ua mauna i ka manao—e—a. Continue reading

The birthday of Princess Ruta Keelikolani Keanolani Kanahoahoa Muolaulani Keikiheleloa Keanohalia Kaleonahenahe Kohalikolani, 1871.

The birthday of Muolaulani.—In a report we received, we learned some things about the birthday of the Royal Governess Keelikolani. We were informed that on the past 9th, that was the day she gave delightful parties, for the day that her mother Pauahi suffered the pangs of labor and gave birth to her. A bit before her birthday, she set up a great lanai a hundred feet or more in length on the grounds of Hulihee Palace, on the right side of the building in the front of Haleolelo. This was large enough for over three hundred people. Her retainers and her people were those who filled out the party. And the taro that she farmed in those days of famine in the year of ’70 was the taro at the feast. Long live the land of the calm of the billowy clouds white like hinano blossoms.

[This reminded me of a video I recently saw on Facebook, speaking of another Haleolelo, this one on the other side of Hawaii Island, giving honor to the Princess and what she stood for. Click here for Oiwi TV’s video featuring Haleolelo.]

(Au Okoa, 2/16/1871, p. 3)

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Ke Au Okoa, Buke VI, Helu 44, Aoao 3. Feberuari 16, 1871.