Thoughts for the upcoming Kamehameha Day, 1920.

THEY ARE TRUE HAWAIIANS BUT THEY CANNOT SING HAWAIIAN SONGS.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Maybe at 3 o’clock or so in the morning of Friday, June 11, 1920, that being the birthday of the Nation Conqueror Kamehameha, there came to my home some singing boys, and this was something; it was a familiar thing where on holidays this and that person came around singing at houses lived in by Hawaiians.

Before the singers came, I got the idea that since these singers were coming to my home, I would get up and listen to the singing outside on the lanai like I was accustomed to in past years; it was not long before I heard strains of a guitar, and the singing started, but it was from my bedroom that I was listening. Continue reading

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Queen Emma sends condolences to Mataio Kekuanaoa, 1866.

News of the Royal Court

Through the kindness of His Highness Mataio Kekuanaoa, we put before our readers these loving words of our Queen Emma.

Upper Gore Lodge, England
Kensington, July 23, 1866.

My Father; Much Aloha:

During these dark days of distress of ours and the nation, I have much aloha for you and the One who left us. Alas for my sister-in-law [kaikoeke], my companion of the land from when we were children. The sun and the rain are companions, joined together by us are the sea spray and the rains steady on the barren fields and the forests; your leader of the islands. How sad; aloha for that lei of ours, my child, and aloha for my dear husband. Alas for you all! My heart is troubled as I am separated alone in a foreign land. It is as if this trip to introduce the Archipelago to the Great Nations of the World is a waste of time. But be patient, O Father, don’t give up, and leave us. For there is one who remains from your loins. Be patient.

With a heavy heart,

Your child,

(Signed) Kaleleonalani.

[There were so many deaths amongst the alii during these years, Ka Haku o Hawaii and Kamehameha IV, and now, Victoria Kamamalu. Not long after, her hanai mother, Grace Kamaikui Young Rooke would pass on. These were indeed dark days for Queen Emma.]

(Kuokoa, 10/6/1866, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 40, Aoao 2. Okatoba 6, 1866.

Queen Emma in New York, 1866.

THE DISTINGUISHED VISITOR.

Emma, the Queen Dowager of the Sandwich Islands, Visits Brooklyn, the Navy Yard, and Sails Down the Bay—Callers at Her Hotel Yesterday, &c.

Her Majesty of the Sandwich Islands, Emma, is determined, it would appear, to see the lions of the famed city of New York while she has the opportunity, and yesterday she extended the pardonable curiosity, which it is not scandalum magnatum to say her Majesty shares with the rest of her sex, to the sister city of Brooklyn. At half-past nine in the morning Queen Emma left her hotel, accompanied by Miss Grinnell, Miss Spurgeon, Major Hopkins, and lady-in-waiting, and drove down Broadway, to the Fulton ferry, whence Her Majesty and suite crossed to Brooklyn. The first place visited was Greenwood cemetery, with the beautiful scenery around which the party was much delighted. On the way back, they stopped at the photographic gallery in Fulton street, where the Queen sat for her portrait.

VISIT TO THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD.

Pursuant to the announcement made in yesterday’s Herald the entire party then paid a visit to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The hour appointed for her arrival was half-past one o’clock, and for one hour an assemblage of the citizens of Brooklyn and elsewhere commenced collecting until the mass numbered upwards of three thousand persons. The gates of the yard were closed to all persons except those who had passes signed by the chief officers. Half-past one arrived, but no tidings were received of the Queen. The crowd commenced to get impatient, jokes were passed to and fro to the parties on both sides of the street, when at length, at twenty minutes to two, two open carriages appeared in sight, containing the Queen, suite and attendants. It was observed as the carriages entered the yard that the first one contained her Majesty, Miss Spurgen, maid of honor; Mr. and Miss Odell; and the second Major C. Gordon Hopkins, of the Hawaiian army, and Miss Grinnell, maid of honor. As the party entered the gates the marine guard were formed in line and received her Majesty at “present arms.” She returned the compliment with a polite bow, the carriages proceeding to Admiral Bell’s quarters, in the Lyceum building. Arriving at this point the honored guest was received and assisted from her carriage by Captain Alexander M. Pennock, chief executive officer of the Navy Yard, who in turn introduced her to Rear Admiral Charles H. Bell, the commandant. The Admiral tendered his arm to the Queen, who promptly accepted it, and the party proceeded to the portico on the second story of the Lyceum. When Queen Emma alighted, the Marine battalion, commanded by Captain Collier, were drawn up in line, presented arms, while the Navy Yard band played the air of “Hail Columbia.” A detachment of the crew of the United States ship Vermont fired a salute of twenty-one guns from the Cob deck battery, and the Hawaiian flag was displayed at the main topgallant masthead. Continue reading

Queen Emma travelling abroad a hundred and fifty years ago, 1866.

Queen Emma.

From what we heard last of our beloved Queen, she is staying at Hyeres in the south of France. We are happy to say that she is in very good health, and so too her entourage. In accordance with the kind invitation by His Highness, the Minister of the Navy [??? Kuhina o na moku], she went to tour the areas where the weapons are stored and the port of Toulon, and she was welcomed hospitably and treated with all honors appropriate to her position. A great feast was given in the evening of the day she went there. Continue reading

Lorenzo Lyons preached, “Never be a double-faced traitor,” 1894.

TOPICS OF THE DAY.

We made a suggestion yesterday for the benefit of the Advertiser in regard to a new version of Hawaii Ponoi as desired by the churchly morning paper. An esteemed contemporary sends us a song composed by the late venerable Father Lyons of Waimea, Hawaii, which he thinks would be fitting to be used as a National Anthem and sung every Sunday at the Central Union Church by the descendants of the true missionaries, as of great benefit for then present and future spiritual welfare. If “Professor” Lyons instead of Sec’y Taylor will “presided” at the organ the effect would be magnificent indeed. This is what good Father Lyons taught the Hawaiians to sing:

Paa mau kuu manao aloha
Paa mau, paa mau,
Paa mau, kuu manao aloha
I kuu aina hanau e!

CHORUS:

Aole au e kipi
No No No, No No, No,
Aole au e kipi, kumakaia
He aloha aina mau.

For the benefit of those of the members of the Central Union who lately have “forgotten” the Hawaiian language we present a free translation:

Everlasting my love shall be
Steadfast ever, steadfast ever
Everlasting my love shall be
To my own, my native land.

CHORUS:

I will never be a traitor
No no no, no no, no
Never be a doublefaced traitor
My love shall ever be true.

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/10/1894, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 8, Page 2. January 10, 1894.

A new scathing “Hawaii Ponoi,” 1894.

TOPICS OF THE DAY.

The Advertiser with its usual ingenuity has finally found the cause for all the opposition among the Hawaiians to the P. G., and to the annexation cause. It is all on account of Hawaii Ponoi, our national anthem, and the morning organette demands, and immediate change in the words of that time-honored song. The new version given by the Advertiser will hardly be adopted, and we therefore take the liberty to substitute some words which we submit to the kind consideration of all loyal Hawaiians who are to be forbidden to sing the anthem of their native land. How is this brother Castle?

HAWAII PONOI HOU.

Pakaha Hawaii,
Kipi i ka lahui,
Na welo mikanele,
Na Pi Gi.

Ino ka ia e,
Ia Kolekaaka,
Pale i ka nani,
Me ka uahoa.

[NEW HAWAII PONOI

They plunder Hawaii
Conspire against the people,
Those missionary descendants,
The P. G.

How vile he is,
That Kole Kaaka,*
Pushing aside beauty,
With his cruelty.]

*”Kole Kaaka” can be found in the dictionary. Look it up. This term with a negative connotation is used often during this period. Might it also be a play on the name Dole? “Wretched Dole”?

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/9/1894, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 7, Page 2. January 9, 1894.