Royal Hawaiian Band headed to America, 1906.

THE ROYAL HAWAIIAN BAND OF THE COUNTY OF OAHU.

The picture below is of the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Alii Hawaii], famous here in the Hawaiian Archipelago, but there will be a small change, that being, this band will head to America in the month of June, and will stay there during the months of July and August, and will have two lady singers, which will be the entire band as is desired. Continue reading

Fifty years of Kamehameha School for Girls, 1944.

Jubilee Reached

On this past Sabbath, there was held a huge party in Honolulu, to commemorate the Jubilee of the establishment of the Kamehameha School for Girls.

The Girls’ school was built in 1894, and there are three of the girls from the school who graduated in 1897 still living, Continue reading

Kamehameha School for Girls new school year, 1898.

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.

This school will be in session again starting next Monday, and so all students are requested to assemble when school opens. Imua, O Hawaiian girls, strive to be educated so that there will be good parents in the future of this Nation. Here forth this is a Nation of the English Language. Therefore, be patient and don’t give up. There is a lot of time not given to learning, and only a limited time allotted for learning; once this is over, it will be too late.

(Kuokoa, 9/2/1898, p. 3)

KULA KAIKAMAHINE O KAMEHAMEHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVII, Helu 35, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 2, 1898.

English-Language Newspaper articles less important than Hawaiian-Language articles? 2012

Here is something to consider…

There are many who believe that English-Language articles are somehow less important than Hawaiian-Language ones. We should not turn our noses up at any history passed down by those who lived it—in any language. Although it is important to take into account who wrote the information and under what circumstances, any information is better than no information!

Here for instance is the coverage the first Kamehameha Girls School graduation received in The Hawaiian Gazette of July 6, 1897, p. 2, “CLOSING EXERCISES”.

Compare this to what we saw earlier from the Kuokoa of July 2, 1897, p. 2, “KA HOIKE O KE KULA KAIKAMAHINE O KAMEHAMEHA”.

First graduating class of Kamehameha School for Girls, 1897.

PERFORMANCE OF KAMEHAMEHA GIRLS SCHOOL.

The Graduates.

On the evening of this past Tuesday, June 29, a performance of speeches and singing was held at Kaumakapili Church by the students of the Kamehameha School for girls, and this was an assembly for the graduation of some students of this school this year with them receiving diplomas.

It is said that there were almost 2000 onlookers who crowded into the walls of Kaumakapili Church, with still more excited people outside, from the Government road until the steps and covering up the entrance.

Right before the Organ was made a stage, and above it were placed pots of greenery of all sorts. And upon this sad the students for whom was that beautiful night [“ka po nani o Halalii”¹].

These are the young ladies of the school who graduated this year: Lydia Aholo, Julia Akana, Kalei Ewaliko, Miriama Hale, Lewa Iokia, Helen Kahaleahu, Elizabeth Kahanu, Malie Kapali, Hattie Kekalohe, Elizabeth Kaliinoi, Keluia Kiwaha, Julia Lovell, Jessie Mahoahoa, Elizabeth Waiamau, and Aoe Wong Kong.

This is the program of events: Chorus: In Heavenly Love Abiding”—”Noho ma ke Aloha Lani” (Mendelssohn). Kamehameha Girls’ School.

Prayer: Rev. C. M. Hyde, D. D.

Topic: “The Teacher and Trainer of Hawaii’s Little Ones”—Ke Kumuao a Alakai o ko Hawaii Poe Pokii: Lewa Iokia.

Mele (Poem): “The Greatest Discovery—Ke Pookela o na Mea i Huliia: Hattie Kekalohe.

Topic: “My Life at Kamehameha”—Ko’u mau La ma Kamehameha: Aoe Wong Kong.

Topic: “The Servant of the Soul”—Ke Kauwa a ka Uhane: Elizabeth Kahanu.

Topic: “Wake the Divine Within”—Hoala ae i ko loko Uhane Pono: Elizabeth Waiamau.

Topic: “A Bit of Clay”—He Huna Lepo Palolo: Kalei Ewaliko.

Chorus: “Sweet May” (Barnby): Class.

Topic: “A Plea for the Children”—He leo i na Keiki: Malie Kapali.

Topic: “Domestic Sciences”—Na Ike Nohona Home: Jessie Mahoahoa.

Topic: “The Use of Music”—Ka Waiwai o ka Ike Mele: Lydia Aholo.

Topic: “A Practical Art”—Ka Ike Hana maoli: Julia Lovell.

Mele (Music): “At School Close” (Whittier): Elizabeth Keliinoi.

Diplomas Given.

Chorus: “Cradle Song:” Kamehameha School for Girls.

Benediction [Pule Hoomaikai] by Rev. E. S. Timoteo.

¹”Ka po nani o Halalii” [Beautiful night of Halalii] seems to be a variation of the idiom “Ka po le’a o Halalii” [Enjoyable night of Halalii].

[I just ran across this article while looking for something else today, and thought it would be a nice follow up to the earlier articles on the opening of Kamehameha Girls School.]

(Kuokoa, 7/2/1897, p. 2)

KA HOIKE O KE KULA KAIKAMAHINE O KAMEHAMEHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVI, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Iulai 2, 1897.

Hawaiian-Language advertisement for Kamehameha School for Girls, 1894.

Kamehameha Girls’ School

The first fourth of the Kamehameha Girls’ School will open on

Monday, December 19, 1894

For applications to enroll in this school, you can write to Miss Pope at Kamehameha School, or to Miss Pope in the Kindergarten Room at Emma Hale, on Saturday mornings from 9 to 12, where she will be happy to meet with the applicants. The tuition is fifty dollars  a year. No applicant below 12 years old will be accepted.

[As you can see, this was barely legible!

Hopefully new and clear images of these newspapers will be taken soon, before they fall apart. After they fall apart, it will be too late. Does anyone know of an organization/organizations that would appreciate the value of the information held in each fragile page, that would consider funding the re-shooting of the newspapers?]

(Kuokoa, 11/17/1894, p. 1)

Kula Kaikamahine Kamehameha.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIII, Helu 46, Aoao 1. Novemaba 17, 1894.