Emalia Kaihumua abused, 1906.

CAUGHT LEPER SUSPECT.

Emalia Kaihumua was attacked by her husband yesterday, the woman’s jaw being broken by a blow from a demijohn. She was taken to the police station for treatment and an investigation disclosed the fact that she was in all likelihood a leper, so she was ordered to the detention station at Kalihi.

(Hawaiian Star, 1/29/1906, p. 8)

CAUGHT LEPER SUSPECT.

The Hawaiian Star, Volume XIII, Number 4322, Page 8. January 29, 1906.

Tragic follow up to Emalia Kaihumua, 1906.

BEAT HIS WIFE AND THE WIFE WAS AFFLICTED BY THE SEPARATING DISEASE.

This past Sunday, January 28th, the husband of Emalia Kaihumua beat her and her jaw was dislocated, because she was struck with a wine bottle. That woman was taken to Kuapapanui, and tended to.

Later, Dr. McDonald of the Board of Health came and examined the injury, and after his examination of some of the flesh of that woman, he gave orders to have the injured woman to the Quarantine Station in Kalihi.

From this it is understood that Emalia is suspected of having leprosy, and that is possibly why she was taken to the quarantine area of the sick.

(Kuokoa, 2/2/1906, p. 4)

PEPEHI I KANA WAHINE A PAA UA WAHINE LA I KA MA'I HOOKAAWALE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 5, Aoao 4. Feberuari 2, 1906.

Sweet Emalia out and about, 1901.

[Found under: “LOCAL ‘HAWKSHAWS’ OWN UP IDENTITY … Sweet Emalia Denied the Oft-Repeated Impeachment]

“Sweet Emalia” was brought before the bar of justice to answer to the charge of being drunk. The fair defendant denied the soft impeachment, meanwhile shedding a copious flow of tears. Emalia was given a reprimand and discharged.

[Yes, Emalia Kaihumua made it out from the insane asylum!]

(Honolulu Republican, 6/2/1901, p. 1)

"Sweet Emalia" was brought...

The Honolulu Republican, Volume II, Number 305, Page 1. June 2, 1901.

Back to Sweet Emalia, 1897.

[Found under: “THIS AND THAT.”]

Sweet Emalia, that is Emalia Kaihumua, is now in the insane asylum [halemai pupule].

[After finding this abrupt notice, one would assume that now that Emalia was admitted into the insane asylum, other than escape, there would only be one way out…]

(Makaainana, 4/5/1897, p. 8)

Aia o Sweet Emalia...

Ka Makaainana, Buke VII—-Ano Hou, Helu 14, Aoao 8. Aperila 5, 1897.

More on the California Midwinter International Exposition from Bila Kanealii, 1894.

The Midwinter Exposition.

J. S. Keawe, one of our officers in the uplands of Kalihi writes that he received the news below about the Winter Exposition being held, from a letter of March 17th by Bill Kanealii from San Francisco: From amongst the new things at the Fair to be seen by the visitors, there is a huge wheel that is 180 feet tall with 18 boxes all around, with each box holding 10 people. Another is the tower with a very tall steeple 300 feet high. The lake is another thing of high esteem; it is stocked with all sorts of fish, with 100 pipes feeding water into the lake with all kinds of water, so many that the visitor would not be able to count them all. The merry-go-round [melekolauna] (a thing that spins), is a quarter mile long travelling around until reaching the place where it starts from. The Hawaii display is the best of all. There are two days that the proceeds are the highest, that being Saturdays and Sundays, where $1,000 or more is the most and $500 or more is the least.

(Makaainana, 4/2/1894, p. 3)

Ka Hoikeike Hooilo-Kuwaena.

Ka Makaainana, Buke I—-Ano Hou, Helu 14, Aoao 3. Aperila 2, 1894.

More on Emalia Kaihumua out and about, 1901.

Sweet Emalia and Moanalua.

Their Problems Before the Court

Moanalua is a youth that we often see with a woman’s necklace all the time, and a women’s pocketbook. He is somewhat feeble-minded, and is always smiling. Moanalua is the name that people know him by, but his real name is something else.

He was arrested for stealing a suit and a pair of slacks from Keoki Woolsey’s place in Waikiki. He did not want a lawyer, and did not want to contest his guilt, and his case is left for the circuit court.

As for Sweet Emalia, she was enjoying the tasty water, swipe [suaipa], and after being filled with this intoxicating liquid, she went along with the two aikane, Kapahu and John Richard [?] on a car ride, in the evening of this past Sunday. The horse was exerted as they sped along King Street, and from the car came that song often heard from children on the streets, “There’ll be a hot time, in the old town, tonight.” This car was seen by a policeman as it sped on crazily, and he called out to stop, but the driver misheard and thought he was being told to speed up; and when the were caught, all the steam was exhausted from the horse resulting from it being run hard. Sweet Emalia and her riding companions were taken to jail [Halewai], and there she entertained the peace officers with her funny antics.

That Emalia was detained with another woman in a single room, and it wasn’t long when they began to display their skill in boxing. The rumbling of the earth was heard, and it was three large officers that separated the two women fighters.

Sweet Emalia was fined $12, and her fellow joy riders were each fined $2.00. Another suit was filed for injuring her companion, but it was dismissed.

(Kuokoa, 10/4/1901, p. 5)

O Sweet Emalia me Moanalua.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 14, Aoao 5. Okatoba 4, 1901.

James B. Pakele reports from San Francisco, 1894.

Behold California, a Land of Cold.¹

J. U. Kawainui,

Aloha oe,

Here I am in California in good health. This is a very cold land, but there is always something new, there is no night here; the nights are like days.

These past few days, I have almost travelled all around the town; I went to visit the sugar refinery of the Millionaire², the place where they build warships, the place where money is minted, and the place where the soldiers drill (the Pressido [Presidio]).

I was at the Cliff House this past Thursday, it is a place that many visitors travel to, I saw the animals of the sea, but that place was very cold. After that, I went to the New City Hall and I spent almost a day visiting the various offices; it is a large structure perhaps eight times the size of Iolani Palace.

There are many poor people here with no place to sleep, and there are also many rich people.

PERTAINING TO THE GREAT EXHIBITION.

I went into the different exhibition halls of the Fair, so astonishing to see; there were all kinds of beautiful things.

I was in Alameda County, a large building, and within it, there was every variety of fruit.

Arizona Indian Building is the exhibition hall of the Indians [Ilikini]. There I saw their way of dancing; their dress is fine, but their dancing isn’t great.

I went into the building of hand crafts and saw the making of the clothes that we wear and so forth, and the exhibition hall of all kinds of animals. This week, one of the handlers was killed, mauled by a lion; the reason for this was the the lights went out when the handler was sweeping inside, at which point it jumped and tore at him. I saw the blood and the suit which is placed out as a display in the pen; today there was a service over his dead body. All the people in the fair attended the funeral, the Hawaiian youths sang in Hawaiian, “In Jesus’ Hands” [“Ma ko Iesu mau lima.”] .

The most highly attended thing is the display of Kilauea in Hawaii; the haole men and women are very taken by Hawaiian things, but above all is the hula kui; all the time is filled with hula kui.

There are two bands constantly playing in the Park, but they aren’t good like the Hawaiian boys; I am always being asked by many people if I will be attending the college that John Wilson³ is attending; I have a letter urging me to go there (Stanford University).

James B. Pakele.

San Francisco, February 17, 1894.

¹”Ike ia Kaleponi he Aina Anu” hearkens back to the mele “E Nihi ka Hele”.

²Spreckels Sugar Company of Claus Spreckels, known here as the Ona Miliona [Millionaire].

³See more on John Henry Wilson in Men of Hawaii.

[For related articles and information, see the previous posts, and the posts soon to come as well! Oh… and coincidentally, i noticed i recently posted James B. Pakele’s death announcement from 1913. He died at Queen’s Hospital on January 30.]

(Kuokoa, 3/3/1894, p. 1)

Ike ia Kaleponi he Aina Anu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIII, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Maraki 3, 1894.

More on Emily Kaihumua and the Australia, 1894.

The things you can find on the internet these days! Look at this excerpt taken from the Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild’s page! The six Hawaiians (plus one more) that left Honolulu for SF aboard the Australia mentioned in the previous post!!

SS Australia

Honolulu to San Francisco

February 10, 1894

1  Bill Kanealii, 61y, Male, Married, Farmer, Able to Read/Write, Nationality: 
    Hawaiian, Last Res.: Honolulu, Destination: San Francisco, Has ticket to 
    destination, Passage paid by Haw'n Exhibito, money is blank, has been to SF
    1864, Join relative or friend: No, is under contract to labor

 2  Sam Kolikoli, 18y, Male, Single, Cowboy, Able to Read/Write, Nationality: 
    Hawaiian, Last Res.: Honolulu, Destination: San Francisco, Has ticket to 
    destination, Passage paid by Haw'n Exhibito, money is blank, has been to 
    SF 1886, Join relative or friend: No, is under contract to labor

 3  Luther Kaihumua, 19y, Male, Single, Cowboy, Able to Read/Write, Nationality:
    Hawaiian, Last Res.: Honolulu, Destination: San Francisco, Has ticket to 
    destination, Passage paid by Haw'n Exhibito, money is blank, In US before: 
    No, Join relative or friend: No, is under contract to labor

 4  Arthur Kaihumua, 17y, Male, Single, Cowboy, Able to Read/Write, Nationality: 
    Hawaiian, Last Res.: Honolulu, Destination: San Francisco, Has ticket to 
    destination, Passage paid by: Haw'n Exhibito, money is blank, In US before: 
    No, Join Relative or friend: No, is under contract to labor	

 5  Emily Kaihumua, 22y, Female, Widow, Able to Read/Write, Nationality: Hawaiian,
    Last Res.: Honolulu, Destination: San Francisco, Has ticket to destination, 
    Passage paid by: Haw'n Exhibito, money is blank, In US before: No, Join 
    relative or friend: No, is under contract 
    to labor	

 6  James Shaw, 28y, Male, Married, Painter, Able to Read/Write, Nationality: 
    Hawaiian, Last Res.: Honolulu, Destination: San Francisco, Has ticket to 
    destination, Passage paid by: Haw'n Exhibito, money is blank, In US before:
    No, Join relative or friend: No, is under contract to labor

 8  James B Pakele, 26y6m, Male, Single, Carpenter, Able to Read/Write, Nationality:
    Hawaiian, Last Res.: Honolulu, Destination: San Francisco, Has ticket to 
    destination, Passage paid by self, possesses $100, In US before: No, Join 
    relative or friend: No, is not under contract to labor

Six Hawaiians, including Emalia Kaihumua, headed for San Francisco 1894.

[Found under: “THIS AND THAT.”]

A little after 12 noon, this Saturday, the Australia left full of cargo for San Francisco. It carried 10,659 letters and 5,000 newspapers, and this was the most by far. The value of the domestic cargo is $26,976. Amongst the passengers were six Hawaiians: J. B. Pakele, Emalia Kaihumua, J. Shaw, and some others. The wharf was festooned as it always is.

(Makaainana, 2/5/1894, p. 8)

Mahope iki iho o ka hora 12...

Ka Makaainana, Buke I—-Ano Hou, Helu 6, Aoao 8. Feberuari 5, 1894.

Another mele by Emalia Kaihumua, 1894.

Ka Uouo a ka Hawaii

No Auseteralia kahi aloha,
Mokuahi lawe laina o ka hema,
E ka mokuahi aukai o ka hema,
Hoihoi mai oe i kuu aloha,
Ke lohia ia mai la e Kaleponi,
O ka lohe ka Hawaii e ike,
O oe ka’u i ike aku ai,
I ke ku kilakila i ka oneki,
Ekolu ou pule i ka moana,
I ka ha o ka pule eha oe ia’u,
Aole no oe e pakele aku,
I ka wai uouo a ka Hawaii,
Auhea wale oe e kuu aloha,
Malama pono oe i ka’u wahi,
Haina ia mai ka puana,
Aia i Puuhale kuu Emalia.

Emalia Kaihumua.

(Makaainana, 1/8/1894, p. 3)

Ka Uouo a ka Hawaii

Ka Makaainana, Buke I—-Ano Hou, Helu 2, Aoao 3. Ianuari 8, 1894.