More on ’93 KS graduate, Abraham Pihi, 1898.

MY DEAR SWEETHEART HAS JUST PASSED, AND MY EMOTIONAL SUPPORT HAS BEEN TAKEN AWAY.

Mr. Editor.

Aloha oe:

Should it be satisfactory to you and your workers, here is my bundle of olive leaves that is placed above, so that our many loved ones living all the way from Haehae where the sun rises to the pleasant base of Lehua where the sun sets may see it.

My beloved has gone, my companion who I would talk with in days gone by, that is my beloved man, Mr. Aprahama Pihi, who is a native and a familiar one of the land famous for the “Kanilehua” [Hilo] and the fragrant bowers of hala of Puna, and the land of the Haao Rains [Kaʻū], that is the roots of my dear husband who left me, his companion, his wife, grieving at the side of his grave. Auwe! How dreadful. Abraham Pihi was born in Puueo, Hilo, Hawaii on the 5th of January, 1872, of E. P. Hoaai (m) and Lilia Palapala (f), and the two of them had 7 children: 5 daughters and 2 sons; and 2 of them went off in search of the footprints of their parents, and 5 remain mourning on this side: 4 girls and one boy.

He was educated at the Hilo Boarding School under the principal, Rev. W. R. Oleson [W. R. Olesona]¹. After he was done there, he entered Kamehameha School in 1893. He was at that school for 1 year, but because it was learned that he had the disease that separates families, he asked the principal, that being the Rev. W. R. Oleson, to release him. He returned to Wailuku, Maui, where his mother was living with his new father, the Rev. S. Kapu; he lived with his parents until he was taken in by the disease that separates families; he was taken from his parents and his younger siblings. He was taken away to this land of no friends in 1895. The number of years he had in this world was 24 and eleven months and 13 days, when his last breath was released. Continue reading

Kamehameha School graduation, 1893.

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL.

Graduating Exercises at Kawaiahao Church—List of Graduates.

The graduating exercises of the Kamehameha Schools took place at Kawaiahao Church yesterday evening, the old stone edifice being crowded to its utmost capacity. The church was decorated with potted plants and evergreens. Revs. W. B. Oleson, the retiring principal, and S. L. Desha were seated on the platform near a picture of the founder of the school, Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop. The exercises opened with orchestral music under the leadership of Prof. Berger, and was followed with a salutatory address by Samuel Mahelona delivered finely. Class statistics by Abraham Pihi preceded a song by the popular glee club. The club received an encore. Two discussions were held—one entitled, “Resolved, That an income tax is desirable for this country.” and the other, “Resolved, That large landed estates are harmful to national development.” James Harbottle and John Wahinemaikai and William Meheula and David Ai took part in the first and Henry Blake and Samuel Mahuka and I. Harbottle and Robert Baker argued on the second. The argument showed careful training and the speakers displayed good elocution. A composition, “Homes for Hawaiians,” by K. Kanehe, was an excellent effort. Moses Kauwe in “Class Prophecy” caused ripples of laughter with his quaint sayings. The valedictory was delivered by M. Hoonani, after which Principal Oleson presented the graduating class with their diplomas. Mr. Desha pronounced the benediction. The graduating class consist of: David Ai, Robert Baker, Henry Blake, Isaac Harbottle, James Harbottle, Matthew Hoonani, Kaili Kanehe, Noah Kauhane, Mose Kauwe, Solomon Mahelona, Samuel Mahuka, William Meheula, Abraham Pihi, John Wahinemaikai.

[Here is a picture of the class of 1893 found on the Kamehameha Schools Archives page. Some names given on the Archives page are not the same as found here.

Here is perhaps a more detailed article on the graduation appearing in the Hawaiian Gazette.

Yet another article in the Pacific Commercial Advertiser.

And this as well.

Also, see this touching follow up post on one of the graduates, Abraham Pihi!]

(Daily Bulletin, 6/16/1893, p. 3)

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume V, Number 754, Page 3. June 16, 1893.

Schools in Hawaii nei, 1844.

[Found under: “KA AHAOLELO MISIONARI.”]

II. The Schools. Lahainaluna College: there were 135 students enrolled in the school just recently. Six of them are studying the apostles of God with Dibela [Dibble]. In April, 30 students graduated, four died, three went home because of illness, and three were expelled for rule violations; that leaves 97 remaining at the school.

They are being taught by three teachers, Dibble, Emesona [Emerson], and Alekanedero [Alexander], in penmanship, in music, math, geography, algebra, surveying, theology, philosophy, composition, and speech. Some study in English, others study in the word of God.

College at Wailuku. The teachers at the school are Bele me kana wahine [Mr. and Mrs. Bailey] and Mi. Okana [Miss Ogden]; there are 47 students living there and eight are married. At the school is taught reading, penmanship, geography, math, philosophy, theology, spirituality and actual work.

Boarding School at Hilo. Laimana laua me kana wahine [Lyman and his wife] are the teachers. There are sixty students at the school; 37 of them have become members in the church. The instruction is like that of the Colleges at Wailuku and Lahainaluna; however they are not progressing far in the difficult subjects like at Lahainaluna.

Girls’ School at Hilo. Koanawahine [Mrs. Coan] is the teacher; most of the food is donated by the church members in Hilo. There are 26 students; there of them are married to husbands, 21 of them have joined the church.

Boarding School of the Alii. Kuke laua me kana wahine [Cooke and his wife] are the teachers. They are instructed only in the English language. The government sponsors this school, and supplies all necessities. It is doing well currently: the students are obedient and are progressing in their knowledge.

Missionary School at Punahou. Dola [Dole] and Kamika wahine [Mrs. Smith] and Rise laua me kana wahine [Rice and wife] are the teachers. There are 24 students at the school. This school is solely for the American missionaries.

Select Schools. There is one in Waioli under Ioane [Johnson]. There are 63 students. It is not a boarding school. The students put effort into working, and it is from this that they get their supplies, and the church members give assistance as well.

In Hilo is another select school. There are 70 students, and Wilikoke [Wilcox] is the teacher. But he might have gone to Waialua to live.

In Kohala is another. Bona [Bond] is the teacher; there are 12 students; there is schooling for teachers there also.

There is a select school at Hana. Rice was the teacher, but he has returned to Punahou now. There were recently 30 students.

Small Schools. In these Islands there are 330 schools; 270 teachers; 12,762 students; 4,000 children can read, 2,100 can write; 5,800 can do math; 1,850 know geography.

[The state of the schools in Hawaii nei was part of what was discussed at a missionary conference held in 1844. This description starts with “II.” because i left the first part of the discussion out which was “I. Pertaining to the Church“.
It would be very helpful if there was online a “comprehensive” list of all variant names for people, like these for many of the missionaries which was published in the Elele Hawaii in 1848.]

(Nonanona, 7/9/1844, pp. 35–36.)

II. Na Kula.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 35. Iulai 9, 1844.

Ma Hilo...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 36. Iulai 9, 1844.