Hana mourns the death of the Queen, 1917.

QUEEN’S DEATH WIDELY MOURNED AROUND ISLANDS

News From Maui Tells of Services at Which Respect is Paid to the Dead

(Special Star-Bulletin Correspondence.)

HANA, Maui, Nov. 23.—In all the islands there is no place more intensely loyal to the noble traditions of the Hawaiian race than in Hana. A queen of Kamehameha I was born at Hana. Queen Kaahumanu was born in a cave on Kauiki Head. Royalty often visited at the home of her parents.

At Wananalua church on Sunday morning a large and representative audience gathered to pay the last honors to the late Queen Liliuokalani. The ancient Hawaiian building was very attractively decorated with flags, royal palms and many beautiful flowers.

William Lennox of the Hana store very kindly loaned his valuable and beautiful collection of royal Hawaiian and other flags. “Old Glory” was there floating over all.

The music and all parts of the service were especially appropriate. The sermon of the morning in English and Hawaiian was upon the text Acts 16:14, Lydia the God Queen. Representative citizens of the Hana district spoke. William P. Haia, Mr. George P. Kauimakaole, Rev. Mr. Mitchell and P. Kamohe called to mind the many virtues of the queen. Mr. Kemohe is the oldest Hawaiian in all this section.

Hana “did itself proud.” The occasion was a notable one and the Wananalua church arose to the opportunity. The day and the celebration will not be forgotten in many years.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 11/24/1917, p. 37)

QUEEN'S DEATH WIDELY MOURNED AROUND ISLANDS

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7993, Page 37. November 24, 1917.

Wailuku memorial for Queen Liliuokalani, 1917.

[Found under: “QUEEN’S DEATH WIDELY MOURNED AROUND ISLANDS”]

WAILUKU, Maui, Nov. 23.—Most interesting services were held on Sunday in memory of Queen Liliuokalani. At the Church of the Good Shepherd at the usual hour of service, Rev. J. Charles Villiers preached a most interesting sermon, speaking of the good life of the queen and what she had done for her people and for Hawaii. There was a large and most appreciative audience.

At the Kaahumanu church there was also an unusually large audience, many coming from Waikapu, and the Japanese church in Wailuku, in honor of the queen. Revs. L. B. Kaumeheiwa and Rowland B. Dodge spoke upon the queen’s life and how much it meant that after the changes that had come in the government here the queen should have done so much to welcome and assist all the people of Hawaii irrespective of nationality.

References to the queen were also made in the Kahului Union chuch and the Makawao Union church by the pastors, though no special memorial services were held.

On Sunday evening at the Wailuku Union church, Rev. W. B. Coale of Lahaina, preached a strong sermon upon  “The Divine Silence.” He was listened to by a most appreciative audience.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 11/24/1917, p. 37)

WAILUKU...

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7993, Page 37. November 24, 1917.

Report of deaths in Japan, 1900.

By the Hongkong Maru.

Word was received by the Hongkong Maru from the Orient that Rev. David Keaweamahi, who left here about twelve years ago for Japan to undergo treatment for leprosy, died in Tokyo on the 29th of July last of consumption. No signs of the disease was visible on his face. He was buried that same evening, a large concourse of friends following his remains to the grave

W. H. Cummings died on July 15th at the Kusatsu springs and was buried there.

(Independent, 8/14/1900, p. 3)

By the Hongkong Maru.

The Independent, Volume XI, Number 1584, Page 3. August 14, 1900.

On the Wailuku Union Church, 1912.

Brief History of the Wailuku Church.

The first building of the Wailuku Union Church was erected in the early part of 1867. Mr. Christopher H. Lewers, Mr. Edward H. Bailey and several others then living in Wailuku were interested in its erection, and assisted in the work. “The Friend” of a somewhat earlier date speaks of the work of the ladies of Wailuku in raising nearly $400 toward the new building.

Rev. Thomas Gardner Thurston, second son of Asa and Lucy G. Thurston, of Kailua, Hawaii, was the first pastor of this Church. He was ordained in the Kaahumanu Church, and ministered to both English-speaking and Hawaiian congregations, beginning his work in the month of October, 1866.

The Wailuku Union Church was organized, January 15th, 1867. Rev. W. P. Alexander was moderator of that council, Rev. S. E. Bishop, D. D., was the scribe. The papers of incorporation were issued the year before, on October 10th. Continue reading

New Kaahumanu Church, 1835.

PERTAINING TO THE CHURCH IN WAILUKU.

Wailuku, Maui, July 27, 1835.

O Tinker—Rejoice with us, at your former place, because our church is complete. It is an adobe structure—but it is good nonetheless. The length is fifteen fathoms in length. Seven fathoms in width. There are five entrances, and they are complete with doors and hinges. There are fifteen windows with shutters. The inside of the building is plastered.

After it was complete, we consecrated the building to Jehovah, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. On that day, the house was filled—everyone could not fit inside. This is how we went about it.

1. We beseeched for assistance in the work that day of Jehovah, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

2. We read the words of God. II. Chronicles, chapter 6.

3. We sang, hymn 33.

4. We prayed.

5. We once again sang, hymn 52.

6. Words of God were explained. This is the passage. II Chronicles 6: 18. “But will God in very deed dwell with men on the earth?”

It is said,

1. God’s dwelling with man is amazing.

Because—He is a great God.—He is glorious—powerful—holy—he is good. His soul is immaculate—his thoughts are righteous—his deeds are correct. He is a jealous God, and he is loathe of vice.

And man is small—and weak—he is not good—his soul is unclean. He is rebellious. He is an enemy of God. How can God dwell with men on earth?

II. It is highly desired for God to dwell with man.

God dwelling with man will make man kind and truly righteous. This will make man able to keep the Sabbath—to live righteously in his house—to read correctly his words—and to pray righteously to him. Continue reading