Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, 1911.

One of the First Stone Buildings of This New Era

(Au Hou, 4/12/1911, p. 1)

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Ke Au Hou, Buke 2, Helu 15, Aoao 1. Aperila 12, 1911.

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E ola mau ka Hale Hoikeike o Bihopa! 1894.

THE BISHOP MUSEUM.

This thing being built is a great treasure that cannot be counted amongst other things of these islands; it will show our progressive state in the future if the intent for its establishment is carried out correctly and without deviation. The Editor of the Advertiser, as usual, is strongly opposed to supplying the Museum with alcohol for preserving its specimens. He did not reveal to the public the main reason for their opposition. This is something amazing in our eyes, that there are reasons that the government can be prevented from agreeing to the wishes of the curator of this great site that will become a place much visited by visitors and locals of Hawaii.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 9/21/1894, p. 2)

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Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 1033, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 21, 1894.

Long live the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum! 1892.

A Visit to the Museum.

President Hosmer and the boarders of Oahu College paid a visit to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum at the Kamehameha School last Saturday afternoon. Prof. W. T. Brigham, curator, showed the collegians almost every article on exhibit at the museum, and his visitors were very much impressed with the relics of the barbaric age of Hawaii nei, only one hundred years ago. Mr. Brigham knows the history of almost everything placed in the museum, and he entertained the students for over two hours with the pedigree of the various exhibits.

[I wonder if the students of Punahou are still visiting the museum today!]

(Advertiser, 10/17/1892, p. 3)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XVI, Number 3203, Page 3. October 17, 1892.

Hawaiian birds, 1874.

Hawaiian Birds.—A letter from Hilo says: “There is in this town a beautiful collection of Hawaiian birds, finely preserved. It would be a valuable acquisition to the Government Museum, if Mr. Mills, the gentleman to whom it belongs, and who has been some years and at considerable expense in the work of collection, would part with it. Among the specimens is one called ‘the wingless bird,’ now nearly if not quite extinct on these islands. They are, however, numerous on Wake’s and Laysan [Laysin] Islands, where I have seen them, and supposed they were a new species. The body is about the size of a pigeon’s, they have no feathers on the flipper-like wings, and they run with such speed that one would take them for rats at first sight.”

[I wonder what became of this collection. Perhaps they went to the National Museum and then to the Bishop Museum. And it seems that among the different upcoming exhibits at the Bishop Museum is one on birds!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/3/1874, p. 3)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XIX, Number 14, Page 3. October 3, 1874.

John Wise on Hawaiian Homes and more, 1921.

The Question about the Work Ethic of Hawaiians.

Your writer [John Wise], continues to defend the Hawaiian lahui from being attacked by that question above.

The Hawaiians have perhaps become much talked about amongst those who do not know them and who are not familiar with their accomplishments of today and of the past. And maybe mostly these days for the land being given to us. Your writer frequently clashes with all kinds of other people who protest the giving of land to Hawaiians, because of the ridiculous idea that they don’t know how to work or that they are lazy.

In these attacks, we can see, O Lahui, that they are carried with criticisms and that it is would be a waste to confirm their misbeliefs. But so that the Hawaiians may answer these questions, your writer wants to be made known for all times the sound justification for our side. The readers of past issues of the Kuokoa have seen the responses given by the Commissioner in Washington, and they have seen also the other justifications given, in the newspaper.

The ultimate representation of the skill of a people is their supplying themselves with food and the things necessary for their livelihood. There perhaps is no better response than that. This lahui was living by  themselves for centuries, supplying themselves with everything, and received no assistance from the outside.

But there are things made by this lahui, things that attest to their fine craftsmanship, that will serve as a measure of their skills. Those that see Hawaiian canoes and their manufacture and how they can get Hawaiians through great gales, remaining solid in the dangers of the pounding of waves; how they could make beautiful canoes by using stone adzes; the distance they were taken from mountain to the sea; the patience of the canoe makers. All of these things will show, without being contradicted, that just by seeing the quality of the canoes can one see that this is a lahui that knows how to work. We see the canoes of today being made by people from other lands, and the canoes made by Hawaiians are far more well made and beautiful.

The beauty of things crafted by a people are undeniable proof of the work ethic of that people. Where will you find things more beautiful, O Hawaiians, if you travel all over the world, than the ahuula that are preserved at the Museum of Kamehameha School. Where is the lahui that lives on today, or perhaps has disappeared, that can make these outstanding works, with a beauty second to none, with fine craftsmanship, and patience; with a true sense of work ethic. Snaring birds is a great task all in itself, the inserting [kuku ana] of the feathers is a big job. One mamo feather cloak was said to have been started during the time of Umi and completed during the time of Kamehameha. For this ahu, the entire ahu were done with mamo feathers. And by our counting back, we see that ten generations of ancient kings passed on before the completion of this ahu; showing that it took from about 250 to 300 years of work. Where is there a great work that was completed by a people taking hundreds of years to construct? We perhaps can think of huge things, but as for something of this nature which required the knowledge and patience of men, there is no equal. Continue reading

The Hawaiian National Museum, 1876.

The Hawaiian Museum is now ready for the reception of articles of interest pertaining to the Archeology and Natural History of the Kingdom.

Glass cases have been fitted up, which are secured with locks: and depositors may rest assured that any articles of interest which they may deposit in the Museum will be carefully preserved.

All articles sent to the Museum will be entered in the names of their depositors, whether sent as loans, gifts, or for sale. Each article should be accompanied with a concise description, and be designated whether sent as loans, gifts or for sale; and if for sale, the prices should be stated.

Any one desirous of contributing to the Museum in any of the specific branches of the natural history of the kingdom, will meet with every encouragement, and all the assistance it may be possible to grant in the furtherance of his efforts, by making such desires known at the Curator’s Office, in the Museum Room, Government House.

All articles designed for the Museum should be sent to the “Curator of the Hawaiian Museum, Government House;” and the receipt of all articles will be duly acknowledged.

The Hawaiian Museum will be open to the public, every day, Sundays excepted, between the hours of 9 A. M., to 4 P. M.

H. R. Hitchcock,

Curator Hawaiian Museum.

Honolulu, Nov. 8th, 1875.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 3/8/1876, p. 2)

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The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XII, Number 10, Page 2. March 8, 1876.

J. E. Chamberlain, collector for the Hawaiian National Museum, 1876.

Curios for the Government Museum.

The Morning Star brought up for the Hawaiian Government the following curios, corals, &c. Two sets Gilbert Island armor complete with helmets; also shark teeth sword and spear, mats and native dresses; eel basket; common fish basket; umbrella coral, three feet six inches in diameter, perfect, from Apian by Mr. Randolph.

From Marshall Island: Spears, Male fringe petticoats and woman’s mat dress; carved figure-head; model of canoe fully rigged; paddles; red coral; black coral; platter coral, bone adzes from Strong’s Island. Continue reading