Roster Legislatures of Hawaii, 1841–1918.

ROSTER
LEGISLATURES OF HAWAII
1841–1918

CONSTITUTIONS OF MONARCHY AND REPUBLIC

SPEECHES OF SOVEREIGNS AND PRESIDENT

COMPILED FROM THE OFFICIAL RECORDS

BY

ROBERT C. LYDECKER

LIBRARIAN, PUBLIC ARCHIVES

PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE BOARD OF

COMMISSIONERS OF PUBLIC ARCHIVES

C. P. IAUKEA
Chairman and Executive Officer

A. G. M. ROBERSTON

M. M. SCOTT
Commissioners

Honolulu:
The Hawaiian Gazette Co., Ltd.
1918

[This is a great reference on various information about the Legislature of Hawaii from 1841 all the way to 1918! It can be found word-searchable online here!!]

 

ROSTER LEGISLATURE OF HAWAII 1841–1914

ROSTER LEGISLATURE OF HAWAII 1841–1914

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Stopping by at Washington, D. C. on the way to see the Queen, 1887.

KING KALAKAUA’S WIFE.

QUEEN KAPIOLANI ARRIVES AT OUR NATIONAL CAPITAL.

Arrangements Made for the Queen to Call on the President and Mrs. Cleveland—A Benevolent Creature on Her Way to Visit Victoria—Queen Emma.

QUEEN KAPIOLANI.

Washington, May 4.—Queen Kapiolani, of the Hawaiian Islands, who arrived in San Francisco on April 20, arrived in Washington to-day and immediately went to the Arlington Hotel. Arrangements have been made for the queen to call on the president and Mrs. Cleveland at noon on Wednesday. The queen and suite will arrive here early Tuesday evening and go at once to the Arlington. A time will be appointed by the queen during her stay here for the diplomatic corps to call on her, and she will also probably receive calls from the naval officers who have been stationed at Honolulu, all of whom have met her majesty, and many of whom have danced with her.

After spending a few days here sight-seeing she will go to New York. From there she goes to England to be present at the Queen’s jubilee. She has never been out of her own country before, and is quite anxious to see the “greatest woman on the face of the earth,” as she calls Queen Victoria. Queen Kapiolani is not of what is known as royal blood in Honolulu. Strictly speaking neither is King Kalakaua of royal blood, as he was elected to the throne and did not inherit it. Continue reading

Celebrating Liliu’s 75th birthday, 1913.

LILIU IS 75 YEARS OLD

There Were Many Who Went to Congratulate Her This Tuesday.

This Tuesday past, Queen Liliuokalani was seventy-five years old, and her friends, companions, locals and foreigners visited her at her home at Washington Place to see her, and to give their congratulations to the Queen of Hawaii nei for reaching that old age.

Just like in past years, there was a rush of the citizens of town to see Queen Liliu; it was so in the morning of this Tuesday, and the Queen welcomed warmly all who shook hands with her; it is estimated that their number reached a thousand.

The hours set aside for the public to visit her was from eleven o’clock to twelve o’clock, but there was celebration on the previous Monday night by singing groups with their instruments, as they serenaded the window of the home of the person for whose birthday it was, until the hours when the sun appeared.

After eight o’clock in the morning of that Tuesday, there was also a luau given to celebrate the day, and the royal attendants and a few malihini were invited, and they sat at the table laden with so many good things.

When the time came for the opening of the audience with the public at eleven o’clock of that morning, everyone showed up at Washington Place [Wakinekona Hale], and there too was the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] honoring the one whose birthday it was.

Present was the Honorable Edward K. Lilikalani, where he stood ready to greet the public, and Colonel Iaukea and John Dominis introduced them before Queen Liliu, as the Queen would always give a smile to each and everyone who shook hands with her.

There also was Princess Kawananakoa to assist the Queen, wearing her finery, while the interior of the reception room was decorated with flowers, and feather capes [ahuula], kahili, and everything hearkening back to the past era, the time when this archipelago was governed by Monarchs.

At this audience, there were many Hawaiians who showed their affection for their queen, by kneeling before her and kissing her hand as they were used to doing.

After the audience, the Queen and her attendants got aboard automobiles headed for her seaside home in Waikiki, where a party was prepared and waited for her and the malihini invited to meet with her and to enjoy with her that day.

The Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] was also there following her to Waikiki, to continue to give honor to the table of the queen.

There were several hundreds of invited people that arrived to that party, from kamaaina to malihini, and they all ate until satiated of what was prepared, and they drank to the health and happiness of the mother, with happy thoughts and with hope that the life of Queen Liliu would be extended and that she would have more years to live.

(Kuokoa, 9/5/1913, p. 1)

PIHA NA MAKAHIKI HE 75 IA LILIU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 35, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 5, 1913.

More on Liliu’s 75th birthday, 1913.

THE BIRTHDAY OF QUEEN LILIUOKALANI

This past Tuesday, the 2nd of September, was the birthday of Queen Liliuokalani; she has been living in this world 75 years, and she is the only reigning queen of Hawaii that has almost reached extreme age.

There was a royal audience that day as was done regularly in the years past, at her home at Washington Place [Wakinekona Hale], before noon; there were many friends and Hawaiian citizens of the queen who went to see her on that day. Princess Kawananakoa assisted her in welcoming the friends and citizens, and Colonel C. P. Iaukea introduced the friends before her, and Mr. E. K. Lilikalani escorted the malihini into the house.

The Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] was there entertaining the audience while they all were visiting the queen; there were many old songs, songs which the queen took great delight in while she reigned and mele that were sung in the days of King Kalakaua.

(Kuokoa, 9/5/1913, p. 2)

KA LA HANAU O KA MOIWAHINE LILIUOKALANI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 35, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 5, 1913.

More on Liliu’s 73rd birthday celebration, 1911.

BIRTHDAY OF LILIUOKALANI

Honolulu, Sept. 2—The commemoration of Queen Liliuokalani’s birthday was held today, and according to what the Queen said to some of her friends:

“This is my seventy-third birthday, and i am in good health; i have left behind the disturbing things of this world in which we live, and have surrounded myself with many friends.”

The Queen’s health is fine indeed, and in the morning, the Band of the County [? Royal Hawaiian Band] arrived to play while she dined on breakfast until 10 a. m. Several associations arrived to giver their congratulations to the Alii; and at 11 o’clock, the procession of haole friends to see the Alii began, and this perhaps is the grandest royal audiences of haole giving their congratulations to the Queen.

The Queen was attired in a beautiful garments fitting of her stature, and attended by the Princess Kalanianaole and Mrs. Irene Holloway and Mrs. C. P. Iaukea. The place where the Queen sat was surrounded by many different kahili, and it was her steward, the Honorable C. P. Iaukea who introduced the many strangers. The Alii, the Queen, met each one who came to visit her and she placed a kind smile upon her Royal visage. When the writer for the Hoku [this newspaper, Hoku o Hawaii] appeared before the Alii, she immediately asked, “How are the famous lehua of the land, the lehua of Hilo; are the famous blossoms of the land still beautiful?”

The Queen wore a white lehua [lehua puakea] lei from Hilo, and on her Royal countenance was happiness. On that morning of her birthday, she presented the water leaping land of Waikahalulu as a Park for the public, and it will be administered for the benefit of the people.

The Hoku o Hawaii prays for the long life of the beloved Queen of Hawaii, and although she has no throne upon to rule, hers is the throne of aloha within the hearts of her loving people. May the Queen live in God.

[Unfortunately the issues of Hoku o Hawaii from 1906 to the early part of 1917 (including this article) are not available online! The more people talk about the importance of the information in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers and the need to rescan those newspapers clearly and make them accurately searchable, the more chance there will be funding for it!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 9/7/1911, p. 2)

LA HANAU O LILIUOKALANI.

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 6, Helu 18, Aoao 2. Sept. 7, 1911.

Queen Liliuokalani birthday celebration, 1911.

Birthday of Liliu.

On this past Saturday, September 2, it was the birthday of Queen Liliuokalani, and a royal audience was held midday of that day between 11 a. m. and 1 p. m. in the afternoon.

At 8 a. m. in the morning of this Saturday, the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] appeared at Washington Place [Wakinekona Home] and played Hawaiian songs which were composed by the alii during the Monarchy of Hawaii nei, and some of these songs were composed by Queen Liliuokalani. The Royal Hawaiian Band played for an hour in the morning to commemorate the birthday of Liliu at Washington Place, and they played once again from 11 midday to 1 in the afternoon.

At 11, the public was allowed to come and see the alii. The Kalama Society, Kaahumanu Society, and Kauikeaouli Society arrived to see the Queen.

The interior of Washington Place was decorated with kahili, just as during the era when the alii ruled—it was beautiful and awe inspiring to see that morning. The Queen sat upon her cotton chair [noho pulu], with two boys behind her chair, holding long kahili, with ahuula upon their shoulders. The Princess Kawananakoa was on the Queen’s right, and Colonel Iaukea was on her left, and he was the one who introduced the Queen to the malihini and to the townspeople. There also, were the heads of the Territory, County, and Federal government. There were many distinguished people of this town who went to see the alii, and by the looks of it, almost one thousand people came during this royal audience.

What shocked this reporter on that morning, was that two-thirds of the people who went to give their congratulations on the birthday of the Queen were malihini and haole. As for the true Hawaiians, only but a few went to see the alii. Reflecting back in time, and seeing Liliu in her finery, i am lulled into recalling the days when Hawaiians were proud upon the soil of their native land.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/8/1911, p. 4)

ka La Hanau o Liliu.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke IX, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.

And yet another on Liliu and the Red Cross, 1917.

Red Cross Flag, Gift of Queen, Flies From Hawaii’s Capitol

Governor Presents Emblem On Behalf of Liliuokalani

Governor Pinkham presenting Red Cross flag this morning. Col. Iaukea, the queen’s secretary, is seen holding the flag.

‘LET ALL WHO SEE IT BE REMINDED OF PATRIOTIC DUTY’ SAYS HER MAJESTY

FOR the first time in history a Red Cross flag was raised today over the territorial capitol, former palace of Hawaii. The flag is the gift of Queen Liliuokalani, and it was at her request that it was first displayed from the staff on the executive building.

In an impressive ceremony held at 10 o’clock this morning Governor Pinkham presented the flag on behalf of the Queen to the Allied War Relief Auxiliary and the Red Cross workers of Hawaii.

Mrs. Henry F. Damon, president of the auxiliary, received the flag and hoisted it to the breezes. The ceremony was held on the mauka steps of the capitol, fully 50 women and a number of men gathering for it. A generous clapping of hands greeted the banner as it opened against a clear background of blue sky and in the bright gleam of a morning sun.

After reading the queen’s letter, in which she presented the flag to the Red Cross workers, Governor Pinkham said:

“Women of the Red Cross:

“You are gathered here to receive from Her Majesty Ex-Queen Liliuokalani, her gift of the emblem of Universal Humanity, that you may raise it above your labors in behalf of those your countrymen and their allies, who with devotion to the very limit of suffering and death, offer themselves in this struggle for universal democracy.

“Your work of alleviation of suffering has touched the heart of Her Majesty and those in authority from the President of the United STates to those on her own island home and her friends, who now know of her deep personal interest, for it has been manifested in every way within her power.

“With the words she has personally caused to be recorded, I in her behalf, present you with the banner of the Red Cross, which you are to place high above the capitol, that all may recognize the place of your merciful and patriotic labors, and the deep heartfelt sympathy and practical assistance of Her Majesty, Liliuokalani.”

Col. C. P. Iaukea, secretary of the queen, then handed over the big banner to Mrs. Damon, who received it on behalf of her coworkers.

“It is a great honor to receive this flag on behalf of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary and the Red Cross workers of Hawaii,” said Mrs. Damon. We wish to thank you, Governor Pinkham, for letting it be displayed on the executive building as a symbol of loyalty and service to the cause of America.

“In 1864 fourteen governments and six societies acknowledged the Red Cross flag as an emblem to be used in the care of the sick and wounded, and the flag is now displayed by all nations and societies as token of this. The first Red Cross banner was raised in 1881 at Washington, District of Columbia, and in 1900 by congressional act was given official recognition.”

When Mrs. Damon had finished the flag was placed on the halyards and she raised it so that the breezes caught and unfolded it in the sunlight. After today it will be taken down and kept in the throne room as a token of Queen Liliuokalani’s generous heartedness.

Beginning today the throne room in the capitol building will be kept open on Friday afternoons to give opportunity for service to those women who cannot come for Red Cross work in the mornings.

Mrs. Henry F. Damon of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary said today that this is in the nature of an experiment and will be kept up only if the attendance on Friday afternoons warrants it. There have been a number of requests to keep the rooms open during some afternoons, and Friday has accordingly been selected.

THE QUEEN’S LETTER

Hon. Lucius E. Pinkham,

Governor of Hawaii.

Dear Sir: It affords me much pleasure in handing you a Red Cross flag, with the request that it be presented to the ladies of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary of the Honolulu, Hawaii, Chapter of the American Red Cross, as an expression of my warm and hearty sympathy with the cause of humanity and an abiding faith in the work of the patriotic women of Hawaii.

In presenting this emblem of the Red Cross, may I suggest that it be first displayed over the executive building so that all who may see it may be reminded of their patriotic duty and know that beneath its folds, in the throne room of Iolani palace, sit a group of silent workers giving of their time and untiring effort in the work of alleviation and mercy?

Very sincerely,

(Signed) LILIUOKALANI.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 9/14/1917, p. 3)

Red Cross Flag, Gift of Queen, Flies From Hawaii's Capitol

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7932, Page 3. September 14, 1917.