More on the California Midwinter International Expo, 1894.

More Exhibits.

The Hawaiian Exposition Company will send another large shipment of exhibits to the Midwinter Fair by the Australia next Saturday. Among the things to be sent are native mats and tapa, poi boards and pounders, surf-boards, etc. Apu, the expert surf-rider from Niihau, will be among the twenty-five natives who will go up on the Australia. Mr. and Mrs. J. Ailau will take with them ten native women, who will make leis, fans and hats at the Fair.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/5/1894, p. 6)

More Exhibits.

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXIX, Number 2, Page 6. January 5, 1894.

Mild hula ku’i and California Midwinter International Exposition, 1894.

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The S. S. Australia Carries the Hawaiian Exhibit.

The departure of the S. S. Australia for the Coast was delayed until nearly 1 o’clock on account of the late arrival at the Oceanic wharf of articles to be exhibited at the Midwinter Fair in San Francisco, which has already opened. Among the numerous exhibits to be seen on the steamer were boxes of large and small coffee plants, boxes of large and small tea trees, brought from Hamakua, two wooden tanks containing different varieties of fish, including eels, a small shark, squid and crabs. The last two species were in one tank, and it is believed there will be a circus started between them when the aquarium is shaken up. There were two monster bullocks in stalls lashed near the stern. Kapahee, the famous surf rider, with his board, his wife and son, three hula girls and four other natives comprise part of the Hawaiian exhibit. Kapahee will give exhibitions in surf riding near the Cliff House, and if the water is clear he will dive and kill fish with a spear he has taken with him. He will also ride the bullocks. The girls under the management of D. Kaahanui will dance a mild hula-kui, while the others will assist about the grounds. Mr. L. A. Thurston superintends the exhibit.

Mrs. J. K. Ailau will make a first-class exhibition of Hawaiian curios at the fair in connection with the Hawaiian exhibit. She has taken with her four young ladies to act as saleswomen.

Messrs. Samuel Parker and A. P. Peterson were passengers on the Australia for the Coast on business bent.

Mr. W. P. Boyd, U. S. Vice-Consul-General, and wife were also passengers. They have gone to spend their honeymoon in the States. Both were gaily bedecked with leis and evergreens.

Miss Kate Cornwell, H. A. Widemann, Jr., F. M. Hatch and L. A. Thurston also left.

Mrs. and Miss Gerber, with their friend Miss A. Cahill, who lately returned from the Volcano, were among the departing throng. Mrs. Gerber and daughter left for home after a short and pleasant vacation on the islands.

Nearly all the passengers were covered with Hawaii’s tropical adieu, viz., wreaths and flowers. The P. G. band played previous and up to the departing of the steamer, and the scene on the wharf was one of bustle and excitement.

(Daily Bulletin, 1/6/1894, p. 2)

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume VII, Number 924, Page 2. January 6, 1894.

More on the missionaries and hula ku’i …and Sweet Emalia, 1894.

CORRESPONDENCE.

[We do not hold ourselves responsible for the opinions or the utterances of our correspondents.]

Morality vs. Speculation.

Editor Holomua.

There is a class or clique of Christian (?) people in our little community who are constantly seeing “the mote that is in their neighbor’s eye, but do not perceive the beam that is in their own eye.” During the past year, that class has written a good deal about the morals of some of their neighbors also have made allusions to improper (?) events of past years.

The debauching hula has been a principal theme of attack. Yet, it may be safely said, that in a number of the “best” society families in this city, the sons and daughters are apt hula kui dancers. “They who live in glass houses should not throw stones.”

What was the scene last Saturday. Three hula dancers¹ went to San Francisco on the Australia, under engagement (presumably) to Mr. L. A. Thurston, who superintends the Hawaiian exhibit at the Midwinter Fair. It is true that the statement has been made that only a mild hula kui will be allowed to be danced. What ridiculousness. Have any of the parties interested ever seen mild hula kui. It has also been stated that the girls have signed a contract for five months.

What spectacle is now seen? The very class who have looked and written upon the Hula as an abomination; for the sake of profit and pecuniary benefit are willing to set aside all feelings of morality and decency, and enter into a contract with girls to use their bodies, so as to be able to offset the dence de ventre and obtain much monetary benefit.

The superintendent of the Hawaiian exhibit is the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, representing the Provisional Government at Washington. SHAME!!!

“Consistency thou art a jewel”—for some people to get.

¹One of these was of course, Emalia Kaihumua.

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/8/1894, p. 3.)

CORRESPONDENCE.

Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 6, Page 3. January 8, 1894.

More on the missionaries, 1894.

Missionary Descendants Show Their Knowledge of Hula Ku’i.

In the Advertiser of 2/7/1894, was shown that at New Haven, United States of America, on the past 17th of January 1894, there was held a party to commemorate the anniversary of the government by the P. G. Those present were: J. R. Kauka [James Robert Judd?], G. S. Walakahauki [George S. Waterhouse], C. M. Kuke [C. Montague Cooke, Jr.?], W. D. Balauina [William D. Baldwin], A. M. Atherton, A. S. Knudsen, J. A. Waila [James Austin Wilder], H. A. Balauina [Harry A. Baldwin], and F. Hastings.

Before drinking to the delight at the Cabinet of Ministers of Cleveland, the young missionaries danced a hula ku’i to a hapa haole song. When the music started, the youths among them who knew how to hula ku’i jumped up immediately and danced and started to sway! …the mixed poi of Poniuailana goes the limit; there you go!—answer the call!—…¹

KE MELE HULA-KUI.

Kaulana mai nei o Mr. Cleveland,
Anti-Annexation no ia ia,
Ua olelo Cleveland i Mr. Willis,
E hele ana oe e Honolulu,
Aia hiki ana oe malaila,
E kipaku oe i ka P. G.
A komo oe Liliuokalani,
Maluna o kona throne!”
Ua hai mai Peresidena Dole,
E noho oe Malie”
Pilikia loa no Alapaki Willis,
E hoka no o Mr. Cleveland.

A MELE HULA KU’I

Famed is Mr. Cleveland,
An Anti-Annexationist is he,
Cleveland said to Mr. Willis,
[“]You are going to Honolulu,
When you get there,
Banish the P. G.
And place Liliuokalani,
Upon her throne!”
President Dole spoke,
[“]You just sit still.”
Albert Willis is perplexed,
Mr. Cleveland is thwarted.

The adeptness at the hula ku’i by these missionary descendants was seen first hand here in Honolulu, along with the girls carrying ukulele.

There you go! Mixed up is the cultivated taro with the wild! The white is smeared; the black gets the score.

What is this S. E. Bishop!—Look to New Haven! Your people’s hula ku’i dancer descendants were  gyrating away!

You missionaries, don’t be hypocritical.

¹…kuupau na ai hoowali o Poniuailana; o—ia!—e, o!—…

[Does anyone have more information on the “Kuupau na ai hoowali o Poniuailana” phrase?]

(Nupepa Ka Oiaio, 2/9/1894, p. 3)

Hoike na Mamo Mikanele i ko lakou ike hula-kui.

Nupepa Ka Oiaio, Buke VI, Helu 6, Aoao 3. Feberuari 9, 1894.