Follow up to Hawaiian National Hymn, 1862.

[Found under: “NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

Good Will.—We are always delighted to release to the public all kind deeds done for the benefit of the people, and therefore, we are showing at once the great kindness of the Honorable, Chief William C. Lunalilo, in his donating the ten dollars he received for composing the National song that was published in our Issue 11, to aid the Queen’s Hospital.

(Kuokoa, 2/15/1862, p. 2)

Lokomaikai.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 12, Aoao 2. Feberuari 15, 1862.

A “fishing” accident, 1913.

MAIMED FROM AN EXPLOSION OF GIANT POWDER

How reckless are the lawless, those who fish by setting off giant powder [kiana pauda] without fear resulting from the many people whose hands were maimed and without stopping this activity; because this past Sunday, a Korean was brought to the Queen’s Hospital with his hand blown off and a side of his face falling victim to the giant powder.

It was only because of the quick action taken by Deputy Sheriff [Hope Makai Nui] Davis of Koolaupoko and Dr. Tuttle that that Korean was saved by stopping the heavy bleeding from his injuries earlier in proper time.

That Korean went that Sunday to blast fish with giant power and his body was found by Deputy Sheriff Davis of Koolaupoko, he was lying on the sand on the side of Kaneohe Bay near Mokapu.

The first thing Deputy Sheriff Davis did was to bring that Korean to Kaneohe, and called for Dr. Tuttle; he hurried in answering to the call, and that is how the Korean’s life was spared; he was would have been in trouble because of the tremendous amount of bleeding.

According to what is understood about how that Korean received his injuries: he went with a friend that day to fish, and because he was not accustomed to and very inept at handling giant powder, that is how this senseless tragedy befell him.

A twist of giant powder was thrown after lighting the fuse, and because it did not go off, that Korean went to grab it and check it out, and while he was handling it, it exploded, and his had flew off, and almost his whole face was burnt by the powder.

When the government man found the Korean, found also was a twist of giant powder ready to ignite and throw into the ocean.

[Notice how the dash in the first word of the title, “pa-huia” signifies that the syllable after the dash is lengthened, and also how the passive “ia” is as usual, not set off—today therefore it would be written “pahū ʻia”

(Kuokoa, 3/21/1913, p. 1)

PA-HUIA E KE KIANA PAUDA A MUUMUU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VL, Helu 12, Aoao 1. Maraki 21, 1913.

Man sent away from Queen’s Hospital, 1913.

REFUSED BY THE HOSPITAL AND DIED AT HIS HOME.

In the afternoon of this past Saturday, a Hawaiian named Kalanaola was brought back at three o’clock, to the Queen’s Hospital to be treated, with a document written by Dr. Wayson at the request of Dr. Li. When that man arrived at the hospital, his wound was cleaned and treated, but the doctors in the hospital refused to admit him there because they were told Kalanaola had diabetes [ma’i akepau]; the astonishing thing was that there was no indication in his death report that he died of diabetes, but in the report it said his death was caused by a sickness of the blood.

After treating his injury, he was placed back on the ambulance and taken back to his home, and on the following Sunday at 6 o’clock, his breath of life left him.

(Kuokoa, 1/31/1913, p. 4)

HOOLEIA MA KA HALEMA'I, MAKE MA KONA HOME PONOI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 5, Aoao 4. Ianuari 31, 1913.

English version of David Kanewanui’s Death Announcement, 1902.

DEATH OF DAVID KANEWANUI, EDITOR OF WEEKLY KUOKOA

THE LATE DAVID KANEWANUI.

THE many friends of David Kanewanui will learn with sorrow of his death, as the result of the gunshot wound received the evening of May 6. It occured early yesterday afternoon at the Queen’s Hospital.

David Kanewanui was born on the Island of Kauai twenty-six years ago. He graduated from Kamehameha School in 1894 and shortly afterwards accepted a position as teacher in the school at Olowalu, where he taught for two years. From Olowalu he went to the Hilo Boarding School, where he taught for another two years, coming from there to Honolulu to take a clerkship in the Auditor’s office.

Something over a year ago the Gazette Company was fortunate enough to secure his services as editor of the Nupepa Kuokoa, which position he filled with ability up to the time of the accident.

The popularity and circulation of the Kuokoa grew under his editorship, for his heart was in his work and he felt that he was doing something for his people. All subjects were handled for what he believed to be the best interests of the Hawaiians, and this being recognized, gave him great influence.

He was always courteous and pleasant and was a great favorite with his co-workers and with the young Hawaiians, many of whom looked to him for counsel and advice.

A fine baseball player, he was a member of the Kamehameha team and was captain of the Hawaiian Gazette Co.’s team.

The funeral, to be announced after the post-mortem, will take place from Kamehameha chapel.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 5/23/1902, p. 5)

DEATH OF DAVID KANEWANUI, EDITOR OF WEEKLY KUOKOA

The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXVII, Number 39, Page 5. May 23, 1902.

Dangers of Mango Season, 1912.

FELL FROM A MANGO TREE.

Joseph K. Pratt, a Hawaiian boy of just eight years of age, on this Tuesday, the 21st of May, fell from a Mango tree in Pauoa Valley, and his cheek was severely hurt; this information was given to the police department over the Telephone with belief that he was dead, but the police arrived there and it was seen that he was alive, perhaps because he regained consciousness from the dizziness after falling.

However, he broke his front teeth and maybe he broke some of his bones; the injured child was taken to Queen’s Hospital. Our instruction to parents of children is to watch over them and not allow them to climb on trees and places that would put the children of ours in danger, for they are the ones who will increase and procreate the generations here forward and through which there is hope for the increase of the Hawaiian Race.

[Words to live by: whether in 1912 or a hundred years later in 2012.]

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 5/24/1912, p. 1)

HAULE MAI LUNA MAI O KE KUMU MANAKO

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 21, Aoao 1. Mei 24, 1912.

Now this is friendship, 1912.

TRAVELLED THE OCEAN BECAUSE OF ALOHA FOR HER FRIEND

There was the shocking news spread about on the morning of Tuesday last week about the streetcar accident, and then on the night of the following Monday like a flash of lightning there came sad news of the passing of Malie Kamakaea at Queen’s Hospital due to her injuries.

When the news spread across the width and breadth of the land and arrived before a tiny girl, a beloved friend of Malie Kamakaea, who lives on Kauai, the girl just left her home, her family and and everyone, and she travelled across the sea to see the cold body of her friend who left her and their schoolmates in this world behind.

The name of this tiny girl is Alice Charman, and she is only nine years old. When her older sisters told her of the passing of her beloved friend from this world, she immediately prepared herself to leave her home and went to the place to board the Kinau, and travelled across the sea all by herself for Honolulu.

When the steamship Kinau docked at the harbor, and while the crowd of people watching over the cold body of Malie Kamakaea and the family were relaxing at the funeral home of Mr. Silva, the sea-travelling child, Miss Alice Charman, arrived to see the cold body of her friend who she shared aloha with over the many days they attended school together.

In her hand she held a beautiful lei woven with flowers of the Garden Isle, woven over leaves of ama’u fern, and this became something appreciated by all; the circumstances of it’s fashioning was something they’d remember always.

It was the love of a friend that caused the trip over the wide ocean; distance is of no matter when summoned by tears.

(Kuokoa, 1/26/1912, p. 4)

AU MAI I KE KAI NO KE ALOHA I KE AIKANE

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 4, Aoao 4. Ianuari 26, 1912.