Memorial tablets in honor of John Papa Ii, Timoteo Haalilio, Levi Haalelea, and Ululani Haalelea, 1907.

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

Dedicatory Services at Old Church Yesterday Morning.

Old Kawaiahao church yesterday morning was crowded for the dedication of memorial tablets in honor of John Ii, Haalilio, Haalelea and Ululani, one tablet bearing the name of Ii and the other the three latter names. Old days were recalled as eloquent speakers spoke of the good works of the aliis who have passed away and in whose honor marble tablets have been inscribed.

The Rev. S. L. Desha officiated at the dedication of the Ioane Ii tablet and also spoke concerning Timoteo Haalilio, while the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani delivered the dedicatory as far as it concerned the memory of Levi and Ululani Haalelea.

The Rev. H. H. Parker was present and introduced the speakers with appropriate remarks.

The Rev. S. L. Desha referred to Ii as one of the high chieffs of the islands who had enjoyed the confidence of royalty, who was a member of Kawaiahao church when Bingham was pastor. He was a member of the Supreme Court and a member of the land commission under Kamehameha III and Kamehameha IV. Not was he only powerful for good in the work of the church, but he had always been noted as a man of great physical strength. One day a young prince had been thrown by an ill-tempered horse and Ii, to revenge royalty, killed the animal with one blow of his fist.

Speaking of Haalilio, Desha stated that this alii was born in Koolau, this island, of most distinguished parents, his mother having been Governor of Molokai. When he was eight years of age his father died and King Kamehameha III took him to court and when Mr. and Mrs. Cooke built the school for the royal princes, Haalilio went there to be educated. He graduated with honors, becoming a particularly good speaker of English.

Hon. Lilikalani, indicating the tablet upon which were the names of Haalelea and his wife, declared that it belonged to no one person, but to all the church for each and all had contributed to the expense.

Ululani was born, said Lilikalani, in…

(Continued on Page Four.)

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/14/1907, p. 1)

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVI, Number 7857, Page 1. October 14, 1907.

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

(Continued from Page One.)

Hilo, July 22, 1842, and at the age of 16, in 1858, married Haalelea, related to the queen of Kamehameha III and to King Lunalilo. The husband died in 1864. There was no issue. In that year H. H. Parker came to Honolulu from Lahainaluna where he had been a teacher, to take the pastorate of Kawaiahao church. Then Mrs. Haalelea joined the church and for 40 years was an active and beloved member of the congregation. She was noted for her humble bearing and good Christian works. She was active among benefit societies for the Hawaiians and others and was a vice president of the Hui Hoola Lahui and an honorary member of the board of trustees of the Kapiolani Maternity Home. She was also one of the presidents of the Hui No Ea. In 1893 it was decided that the Kawaiahao church was a dangerous place to enter on account of the rottenness of the roof and other timbers. They were troublous times then, the dethronement of Liliuokalani being the tais and one man’s hand turned against another, said Lilikalani, and it was not thought that any money could be raised for repairs, but Mrs. Haalelea got up a church fair that realized $2000 and this money was the beginning of a fund that finally, with the help of prominent and generous Honolulu people, resulted in the repair of the sacred edifice. On this account Lilikalani referred to Mrs. Haalelea as the second founder of Kawaiahao.

[Check out this article on the same topic found in one of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, written by E. K. Lilikalani himself!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/14/1907, p. 4)

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVI, Number 7857, Page 4. October 14, 1907.

Hana mourns the death of the Queen, 1917.

QUEEN’S DEATH WIDELY MOURNED AROUND ISLANDS

News From Maui Tells of Services at Which Respect is Paid to the Dead

(Special Star-Bulletin Correspondence.)

HANA, Maui, Nov. 23.—In all the islands there is no place more intensely loyal to the noble traditions of the Hawaiian race than in Hana. A queen of Kamehameha I was born at Hana. Queen Kaahumanu was born in a cave on Kauiki Head. Royalty often visited at the home of her parents.

At Wananalua church on Sunday morning a large and representative audience gathered to pay the last honors to the late Queen Liliuokalani. The ancient Hawaiian building was very attractively decorated with flags, royal palms and many beautiful flowers.

William Lennox of the Hana store very kindly loaned his valuable and beautiful collection of royal Hawaiian and other flags. “Old Glory” was there floating over all.

The music and all parts of the service were especially appropriate. The sermon of the morning in English and Hawaiian was upon the text Acts 16:14, Lydia the God Queen. Representative citizens of the Hana district spoke. William P. Haia, Mr. George P. Kauimakaole, Rev. Mr. Mitchell and P. Kamohe called to mind the many virtues of the queen. Mr. Kemohe is the oldest Hawaiian in all this section.

Hana “did itself proud.” The occasion was a notable one and the Wananalua church arose to the opportunity. The day and the celebration will not be forgotten in many years.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 11/24/1917, p. 37)

QUEEN'S DEATH WIDELY MOURNED AROUND ISLANDS

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7993, Page 37. November 24, 1917.

Wailuku memorial for Queen Liliuokalani, 1917.

[Found under: “QUEEN’S DEATH WIDELY MOURNED AROUND ISLANDS”]

WAILUKU, Maui, Nov. 23.—Most interesting services were held on Sunday in memory of Queen Liliuokalani. At the Church of the Good Shepherd at the usual hour of service, Rev. J. Charles Villiers preached a most interesting sermon, speaking of the good life of the queen and what she had done for her people and for Hawaii. There was a large and most appreciative audience.

At the Kaahumanu church there was also an unusually large audience, many coming from Waikapu, and the Japanese church in Wailuku, in honor of the queen. Revs. L. B. Kaumeheiwa and Rowland B. Dodge spoke upon the queen’s life and how much it meant that after the changes that had come in the government here the queen should have done so much to welcome and assist all the people of Hawaii irrespective of nationality.

References to the queen were also made in the Kahului Union chuch and the Makawao Union church by the pastors, though no special memorial services were held.

On Sunday evening at the Wailuku Union church, Rev. W. B. Coale of Lahaina, preached a strong sermon upon  “The Divine Silence.” He was listened to by a most appreciative audience.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 11/24/1917, p. 37)

WAILUKU...

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7993, Page 37. November 24, 1917.

Decoration Day, 1909.

“DAY TO STREW FLOWERS”

As has been the custom in previous years, that is the observation of memorial day [la lupua], the town is similarly decorating the graves of their loved ones with flowers of every type, and the cemeteries of the many who have passed are truly beautiful to see.

The 30th of May has been taken as a day to “strew flowers,” being that it is the month in which many flowers are seen, and also it is the final day the soldiers served as soldiers in the great war [kaua huliamahi].

The number of the [national] cemeteries in the different States of the United States, for the soldiers who sacrificed their lives for their land, is about seventy-seven, and within them they hold about four-hundred fifty thousand bodies. It is for them that the day is set aside; it is a time for the living to show their loving remembrances for those who bore suffering for the welfare of the people who enjoy the rights and blessings for which they sought after.

In the year 1882, the parades and speeches for those who died on the battlefields were initiated, and that is what happened this past Monday by the soldiers of this town.

Taking the words of General John B. Gordon, “It is impossible for us who are today joyful, to deny the truth of these things, that being, those who are living should be as true brothers of those people who suffered injuries for the blessings of this land. They stood and fought for the righteousness of the law and for independence, and that is how this generation then should remain and defend the very same right, continually pushing America on higher in all areas of progress.”

(Kuokoa, 6/9/1909, p. 4)

KA LA LUPUA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 23, Aoao 4. Iune 9, 1909.

Monument to Kauikeaouli on his 100th birthday, 1914.

UNVEILING OF THE DONATED TABLET

The Populace Gathers in Kawaiahao on the Evening of this Past Tuesday.

It was a scene from the sacred times when the Islands were ruled under monarchs, that was before a great crowd of people which arrived at Kawaiahao Church in the afternoon of this past Tuesday, when a memorial service for the hundredth birthday of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III was held, and unveiled was the stone tablet dedicated to him that will be stood at the place of his birth at Keauhou, North Kona, Hawaii.

Before the hour set aside for that remembrance, at four o’clock in the afternoon, the crowd entered the church: from the members of the organizations of this town, the students of the Kamehameha Schools, the heads of the government, to the general public, filled up the church, with some people standing.

Outside of the church grounds was the Royal Hawaiian Band entertaining the people, with a majority of the people there, because they could not get a seat in the church.

Before the pulpit stood a painting of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, and right below the painting was the tablet with clear lettering that said: “Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, ke keiki a Kamehameha III ame Keopuolani. Hanauia i Maraki 17,1814. Ka Moi lokomaikai.”

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More Decorating the Kamehameha Statue, 1912.

MALIHINIS AND KAMAAINAS CELEBRATE KAMEHAMEHA DAY

Leading Hawaiians Decorating the Statue of Kamehameha yesterday.

(From Wednesday’s Advertiser.)

Cloaked in leis from helmet to feet the stalwart and majestic Kamehameha looked out over city and mountains in the light of a perfect day, thousands of holiday makers shut up shop and went out to play yesterday in honor of the first king of Hawaii Nei and scores of horsemen passed before the statue keeping the old Kamehameha Day custom.

Aside from the pleasant weather, which is a traditional accompaniment of the day, the decorating of the statue and the Hawaiian races and luau at Kalihi there was not much to remind the public of Kamehameha, and it would seem that the public determined to turn the occasion into a playful Sunday. There were no pa-u riders, although a number of horsemen on all grades and classes of steeds rode about town in groups. Many of them were cowboys in full regalia.

There were a few Hawaiian flags in evidence, one or two consular flags and hundreds of bare flag-poles. Evidently the brilliant sun was relied upon to bring out the natural colors of Honolulu’s setting so the bunting was deemed unnecessary.

An enormous crowd turned out to see the marathon runners come in from Haleiwa, another enormous crowd made a pilgrimage to aquatic and other sports at the Kalihi races and luau, and it seemed that half of Honolulu crowded about the Athletic Field at Punahou and tried to climb the fence while all the youngsters in town were inside drinking pop and playing games at the Central Union Church’s picnic.

Beaches Crowded.

The beaches were crowded all day and the sunburn “took fine” on a thousand or more lily complexions. At nine o’clock yesterday morning the crowds began to gather along King street and by noon the police were busy keeping people off the car tracks and pulling the absent minded from in front of tooting automobiles between Kalihi and Waikiki. The bicycle and foot races stirred up as much enthusiasm and drew as big a holiday crowd as a pa-u parade in the old days when Kamehameha was honored in true Hawaiian style. The old Portuguese statue worshiper who performs his unique rites before the judiciary building daily was not in evidence yesterday. He probably got a glimpse of his old friend the king in his giddy, gaudy holiday rags at long range and thought him lacking in the dignity which should hedge a real worshipful deity.

Draping the Monarch.

The work of clothing the deep chested monarch in flowers was done yesterday morning by the Order of Kamehameha. Fifty members of the lodge marched from the Odd Fellows building to the statue about eight-thirty o’clock carrying their flowers and leis and after the decorating formed in a circle in front of the statue where they were addressed by Kaukau Alii Chung Hoon, Sr. The ceremony closed with the singing of Hawaii Ponoi. There was a large general attendance of spectators at this function.

When the mounted police squad came back from the Punahou picnic they were as weary as a force of fond mothers after getting the youngsters washed and dressed for Sunday school. For about five hours they had hopped from one corner of the athletic field to the other persuading the irrepressible small boys on the outside that they were not invited and that entrance was to be had at the gate and by ticket. The Central Union Bible class was entertaining the Kakaako and Palama mission schools and the latter were certainly entertained.

At the close of the races the big down-town crowds dispersed, the few stores that were open in the forenoon closed, Absalom stretched out in the middle of the sidewalk at Fort and King and had a snooze and a Sabbath-like calm brooded over the city of palms and poi, as the poet might say.

[Found on Chronicling America!]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 6/14/1912, p. 2)

MALIHINIS AND KAMAAINAS CELEBRATE KAMEHAMEHA DAY

The Hawaiian Gazette, Volume LV, Number 39, Page 2. June 14, 1912.

Decorating the Kamehameha Statue, 1912.

[Found under: “Local News”]

All members of the Ahahui Kamehameha Division 1 are requested to assemble in the Building of the Secret Society, Odd Fellows, at 10 in the morning of this coming Sunday, June 9, 1912, to go on to pray in Kawaiahao Church, as is done in all past years; and they are also ordered to assemble within Kapiolani Hale at half past 8 on the morning of Tuesday, the 11th of June, 1912, to go and decorate the statue of Kamehameha I in front of the Government Building. Do not forget this order!

(Kuokoa, 6/7/1912, p. 8)

Ua makemakeia na lala apau...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 23, Aoao 8. Iune 7, 1912.

Gravestone advertisement, 1882.

MARBLE HEADSTONES AT LOW COST

LIKE SLATE [PAPA?] HEADSTONES.

The person whose name appears at the bottom wishes to announce to the Hawaiian people that he has acquired material for Monuments and Tombstones which he wants to sell for a good price, from $8.00 up.

I can send images and prices of the tombstones to people on the other islands, should they ask me, so that it can be done without the large expense of travelling to Honolulu.

J. D. LANE.

Engraver of Marble Monuments of all types. Bethel Street, Honolulu.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 5/6/1882, p. 2)

UA EMI KA HE KUPAPAU MABELA

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke V, Helu 18, Aoao 2. Mei 6, 1882.