Kaumakapili Church member, 1910.

Old Member of Kaumakapili.

Mr. Aheakalani.

The picture above is one of Aheakalani, one of the very old members of Kaumakapili Church, and he has perhaps reached the age of ninety-five, being that he was going about about during the time Kamehameha was king.
He was first in the congregation of the church of Waiohinu, Kau, when the kahu were Parker, Mikahana and Mikini.

However, when he returned to Honolulu to live, he became a member of Kaumakapili Church, when Rev. Rowell Smith was kahu. And from that time, he has been one of the congregation there for sixty years. He is in good health and walks to prayer ever Sunday.
He is stout, but he is in recovery, and walks every Sunday with his cane, and through him, God is glorified for his amazing works.
(Kuokoa, 5/27/1910, p. 5)
HE HOAHANAU KAHIKO NO KAUMAKAPILI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 21, Aoao 5. Mei 27, 1910.

People from Nuuhiva, 1867.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS: OAHU”]

The Nuuhivans.—Upon the sail of the New Hokuao to Fatuhiva, eight Nuuhivans returned to the land of their birth, those were the people who lived with Rev. J. Bicknell [Bikanele] in Ewa. On this past Sunday night, there was a great gathering at Kaumakapili Church, to hear the words of gratitude by some of these people as they leave Hawaii nei. Here are those who were placed in the church of Ewa from amongst these people: Daniela Kao, Davida Line, and Iakobo Hiki. And these three were the ones who gave speeches at the church in Hawaiian. All who entered listened carefully to their speaking of Hawaiian. According to them, they are returning to teach about the light of life in their unenlightened lands; and they bid all of Hawaii to pray on their return, that they may be put on land safely, and soon teach the words of the kingdom of heaven. Before being released, the entire congregation donated money for their daily needs, and $40.00 was collected, along with capes that were gifted. Last Monday, the benevolent brought gifts and gave it to the treasurer of those people. Therefore, it is as if this is the enlightening voice announcing to the devout Hawaiians to pray for them. And we can say without doubt that you will all join in in praying for them.

We are appending the names of the people who returned: Daniela Kao, Davida Lima, Iakoba Hii, and Elizabeth Kahiau. They joined the church of Ewa this year. Tahuhu, Patehe, Tahu, Waitoi, and Mego (female), did not become brethren. According to them, they came along with the Honorable John Ii; there were twenty of them. When they landed in Honolulu, 11 of them lived with John Ii, and nine went with Rev. J. Bicknell to Ewa, and one of those died; those in Honolulu from amongst them are 6. One stayed in Hawaii, and one went on a whaling ship. They came all together, and a portion returned home.

(Kuokoa, 3/30/1867, p. 2)

Na Nuuhiva.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 13, Aoao 2. Maraki 30, 1867.

English-Language Newspaper articles less important than Hawaiian-Language articles? 2012

Here is something to consider…

There are many who believe that English-Language articles are somehow less important than Hawaiian-Language ones. We should not turn our noses up at any history passed down by those who lived it—in any language. Although it is important to take into account who wrote the information and under what circumstances, any information is better than no information!

Here for instance is the coverage the first Kamehameha Girls School graduation received in The Hawaiian Gazette of July 6, 1897, p. 2, “CLOSING EXERCISES”.

Compare this to what we saw earlier from the Kuokoa of July 2, 1897, p. 2, “KA HOIKE O KE KULA KAIKAMAHINE O KAMEHAMEHA”.

First graduating class of Kamehameha School for Girls, 1897.

PERFORMANCE OF KAMEHAMEHA GIRLS SCHOOL.

The Graduates.

On the evening of this past Tuesday, June 29, a performance of speeches and singing was held at Kaumakapili Church by the students of the Kamehameha School for girls, and this was an assembly for the graduation of some students of this school this year with them receiving diplomas.

It is said that there were almost 2000 onlookers who crowded into the walls of Kaumakapili Church, with still more excited people outside, from the Government road until the steps and covering up the entrance.

Right before the Organ was made a stage, and above it were placed pots of greenery of all sorts. And upon this sad the students for whom was that beautiful night [“ka po nani o Halalii”¹].

These are the young ladies of the school who graduated this year: Lydia Aholo, Julia Akana, Kalei Ewaliko, Miriama Hale, Lewa Iokia, Helen Kahaleahu, Elizabeth Kahanu, Malie Kapali, Hattie Kekalohe, Elizabeth Kaliinoi, Keluia Kiwaha, Julia Lovell, Jessie Mahoahoa, Elizabeth Waiamau, and Aoe Wong Kong.

This is the program of events: Chorus: In Heavenly Love Abiding”—”Noho ma ke Aloha Lani” (Mendelssohn). Kamehameha Girls’ School.

Prayer: Rev. C. M. Hyde, D. D.

Topic: “The Teacher and Trainer of Hawaii’s Little Ones”—Ke Kumuao a Alakai o ko Hawaii Poe Pokii: Lewa Iokia.

Mele (Poem): “The Greatest Discovery—Ke Pookela o na Mea i Huliia: Hattie Kekalohe.

Topic: “My Life at Kamehameha”—Ko’u mau La ma Kamehameha: Aoe Wong Kong.

Topic: “The Servant of the Soul”—Ke Kauwa a ka Uhane: Elizabeth Kahanu.

Topic: “Wake the Divine Within”—Hoala ae i ko loko Uhane Pono: Elizabeth Waiamau.

Topic: “A Bit of Clay”—He Huna Lepo Palolo: Kalei Ewaliko.

Chorus: “Sweet May” (Barnby): Class.

Topic: “A Plea for the Children”—He leo i na Keiki: Malie Kapali.

Topic: “Domestic Sciences”—Na Ike Nohona Home: Jessie Mahoahoa.

Topic: “The Use of Music”—Ka Waiwai o ka Ike Mele: Lydia Aholo.

Topic: “A Practical Art”—Ka Ike Hana maoli: Julia Lovell.

Mele (Music): “At School Close” (Whittier): Elizabeth Keliinoi.

Diplomas Given.

Chorus: “Cradle Song:” Kamehameha School for Girls.

Benediction [Pule Hoomaikai] by Rev. E. S. Timoteo.

¹”Ka po nani o Halalii” [Beautiful night of Halalii] seems to be a variation of the idiom “Ka po le’a o Halalii” [Enjoyable night of Halalii].

[I just ran across this article while looking for something else today, and thought it would be a nice follow up to the earlier articles on the opening of Kamehameha Girls School.]

(Kuokoa, 7/2/1897, p. 2)

KA HOIKE O KE KULA KAIKAMAHINE O KAMEHAMEHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVI, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Iulai 2, 1897.

Woah. This is some story! Hawaiian living abroad comes home to visit… after 38 years. 1915.

THAT HAWAIIAN RETURNS TO SEE HIS HOMELAND ONCE MORE.

JOHN BELL WILSON

After leaving Honolulu thirty-eight years ago, that Hawaiian, John Bell Wilson is his name, returned to see once again his family and homeland while he was still in good health, on the steamship Matsonia this past Wednesday, filled with shock at how the places he was familiar with in his childhood had changed.

John Bell Wilson left Honolulu nei when he was a youngster of twenty-three years in age on a sailboat, because there were few steamships in his day, but it was upon a beautiful steamship that he returned to see the land of his birth and his friends, as he was shocked at the change of Honolulu from an almost nothing town which he left to a beautiful town which one admires.

His eyes met up with new sights of Honolulu and ethnicities which were unfamiliar to him; and as he travelled here and there, there were no friends who he knew in his youth, except for but a few who were still living which he met up with, those friends who he went around with in those days gone by.

Heard of the Death of His Mother

When John Bell Wilson returned to see his homeland, he had one big thing on his mind, that was meeting affectionately with his mother, who he thought was still living, but she was not, and this left him heartbroken.

Mr. Wilson was depressed at the death of his mother, being that from the time he left this land until his return, he did not write his mother; and when he asked his friends when he landed ashore about his mother, this was when he was told she had passed long ago to the other side, three years ago.

He went immediately to find the grave where his mother was laid to rest, and he planned to build a memorial to her, as a show of remembrance from a thoughtless child for his beloved mother.

Not Recognizing Honolulu

According to the words of Mr. Wilson after he saw the scenery unfamiliar to him, he could not recall the old Honolulu, because the town had changed so much from when he left, however he did have recollections of the major streets of town.

When he travelled about looking here and there, those scenes were not familiar to him, except for just a few people who went around with him and played with him in the days of his childhood. The small children he left behind were now very elderly and some of them had white hair.

Some of the familiar people who he saw on the first day he

(See page four.)

(Kuokoa, 2/5/1915, p. 1)

HULI HOI MAI IA KANAKA HAWAII E IKE HOU I KA AINA HANAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 5, 1915.

RETURNED TO THE HOMELAND

(From page one.)

stepped once again on the soil of Hawaii, were J. K. Kamanoulu and East Kahulualii who work at the newspaper printing office.

In the days of his childhood, he went often to the old Kaumakapili Church, and he was enrolled at Lahainaluna School, and according to him, C. P. Iaukea is one of his friends who is still living.

Became Wealthy in a Foreign Land

When he left the land of his birth, he got off at Sutter County, California, and there he sought very hard until he became well off.

He married his wife, and they currently have five grown children, and he provided a good home for his family. He is the one who supplies the market of Sacramento with fish and meat, and he also makes profits from the farming industry.

Kalakaua was the King of Hawaii nei at the time he last saw Hawaii, and Lorrin A. Thurston was but a child.

There are many people from Hawaii who have met up with him in California, and in the year 1891, in the town of San Francisco, he met with King Kalakaua there, and they dined together, drank and talked, and just a few days after that was when King Kalakaua died.

Did Not Forget His Mother Tongue

Mr. Wilson is now sixty-one years old, so he was living thirty-eight years abroad, and he has not forgotten his native language, he is still fluent in Hawaiian, just as the people here are.

According to him, he will spend three months staying in Hawaii before returning to his family who await him.

(Kuokoa 2/5/1915, p. 4)

HULI HOI MAI I KA AINA HANAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Feberuari 5, 1915.

Pretty cool map of Honolulu, 1845.

HONOLULU.

In the picture above, clear are the yards and streets, and the layout of Honolulu, the great city of Hawaii. Here is where the King lives permanently, as well as the Prime Minister, and the Nation’s Legislature.

By the numbers on the picture, each place is clearly recognized, Thusly:

1. Residence of the King.

2. Fort, where the Governor lives.

3. Church of the King at Kawaiahao, where Armstrong preaches salvation.

4. Catholic Church, of Maigret them.

5. Smith’s Church at Kaumakapili.

6. Haole church at Polelewa, of Damon

7. School of the Young Chiefs

8. Hotel, “welcoming house”.

9. Government building at Honolulu.

10. Government printing house.

11. Haole school.

12. Store of Brewer them.

13. Store of Pele [Bell?] them.

14. Infirmary for the sailors from America.

15. Infirmary for the sailors from Britain.

16. Infirmary for the sailors from France.

17. British Consulate.

18. American Consulate.

19. French Consulate.

20. Building of the American diplomats.

21. House of Damon the pastor of the sailors.

22. Street going to Nuuanu.

23. Street going to Ewa.

24. Street going to Waikiki.

25. Inner Harbor.

26. French Hotel.

27. Place of the American missionaries.

This is the number of stores in Honolulu.

Clothiers, 11.

Small shops, 14.

Auction houses, 2.

Hotels, 5.

Establishments not selling liquor, 6

Saloons, 6.

(Elele, 10/7/1845, pp. 105–106.)

HONOLULU.

Ka Elele, Buke 1, Pepa 14, Aoao 105-106. Okatoba 7, 1845.

Two marriages, Chung Hoon/Akina & Koki/Kuaea, 1896.

Bound Together as One.

This past Thursday night, as we mentioned earlier, mauka of the residence of Rev. H. H. Parker, William H. Chung Hoon (Uilama Kanahana) and Miss Alo Akina of Kohala, Hawaii, were bound together by him (Parker). The husbandʻs neighborhood held a reception at Kauluwela, which was followed by a feast.

On that same night, after that marriage above, in the church of Kaumakapili, joined together by the Rev. H. H. Paker, was Solomona Davida Koki to Miss Esetera U. K. Kuaea. The couple arrived at 8, and it was performed immediately. There was much waiting until the church was filled with the crowd. The young girl is the organist of the church, and a student of W. Tela [W. Taylor? W. Tell?]. W. Tela played the organ while the marriage ceremony took place. There was a reception held after at the girlsʻ school of Kawaiahao, and a feast the day following at Waikahalulu. The couple boarded the Kinau of this Saturday morning to spend their first days of marriage in the land of the husband, at Waimea, Hawaii.

(Makaainana, 12/14/1896, p. 1)

Uoia a Lilo i Hookahi.

Ka Makaainana, Buke VI----Ano Hou, Helu 24, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 14, 1896.