John Rollin “JACK” Desha, 1917.

J. R. DESHA

DESHA, JOHN ROLLIN, Washington, D. C.; born at Napoopoo, S. Kona District, Hawaii, Jan. 22, 1887, a descendant of the Desha family of Kentucky; son of Stephen Langhern and Mary Kaakopua (Kekumano) Desha; educated at the Kamehameha School and Oahu College (Honolulu), Harvard University, A. B. 1912, attending Geo. Washington University, Law Dept.; married Agnes Ready at Medford, Mass.; two children: Evelyn and Jacqueline. Has been private secretary to the Hon. J. K. Kalanianaole, delegate to U. S. Congress from the Territory of Hawaii since 1912. Conducted the Congressional Party to Hawaii, which included more than 125 people, in 1915. Member of the Delta Upsilon Frat. (Harvard), Harvard Club of Washington, D. C., Harvard Varsity Club and Chiefs of Hawaii.

(Siddall, John William, ed. “Men of Hawaii,” Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Ltd. 1917.)

J. R. DESHA

Siddall, John William, ed. “Men of Hawaii.” Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Ltd. 1917.

 

Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett, 1925.

Here is a photograph of Dr. A. K. Hanchett from The Story of Hawaii and Its Builders, with which is incorporated volume III Men of Hawaii; an historical outline of Hawaii with biographical sketches of its men of note and substantial achievement, past and present, who have contributed to the progress of the Territory, edited by George F. Nellist. Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Ltd., 1925. p. 481!

[It seems that his mother, Julia Palaile Hanchett first married a Crowell, and then following that married the grandson of Hanchett, the whaler. Her Crowell children were raised alongside with her Hanchett children. Thanks to Chris Faye for the information and for pointing out that the picture was there.]

Dr. A. K. Hanchett

Dr. A. K. Hanchett

Missionary Album, 1969.

MISSIONARY ALBUM

Portraits and Biographical Sketches of the
American Protestant Missionaries
to the Hawaiian Islands

Enlarged from the Edition of 1937

Sesquicentennial Edition
Published by the
Hawaiian Mission Children’s Society

1969

Honolulu, Hawaii

[This is a great reference if you are looking for information on Protestant missionaries to Hawaii nei. It was put out by the Mission Children’s Society. Unfortunately, it seem that the list of missionaries to Micronesia and the Marquesas was left out of the publication to make room for the index.

I am not sure if it still available for purchase at the Mission Houses, because I cannot find it online, as they seem to be doing an overhaul of their gift shop portion of their online site, which can be found here.

And don’t forget that this is a useful list when researching missionaries!]

(Missionary Album, 1969.)

Missionary Album, 1969.

Missionary Album, 1969.

Men of Hawaii, Volume II, 1921.

MEN OF HAWAII

BEING A

BIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCE LIBRARY,

COMPLETE AND AUTHENTIC, OF THE MEN OF NOTE

AND SUBSTANTIAL ACHIEVEMENT IN THE

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

Volume II.

Revised

Edited by

John William Siddell

Published by

HONOLULU STAR-BULLETIN, LIMITED

Territory of Hawaii

1921.

[Here is a revised version of Men of Hawaii, available online here at the Internet Archive (www.archive.org) that is word searchable!]

Men of Hawaii, Volume II

Men of Hawaii, Volume II

Men of Hawaii, 1917.

MEN OF HAWAII

BEING A

BIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCE LIBRARY,

COMPLETE AND AUTHENTIC, OF THE MEN OF NOTE

AND SUBSTANTIAL ACHIEVEMENT IN THE

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

Volume I.

Edited by

John William Siddell

Published by

HONOLULU STAR-BULLETIN, LIMITED

Territory of Hawaii

1917.

[Here is another good reference book of biographies and occasionally pictures which you can find online here at the Internet Archive (www.archive.org) that is word searchable!]

 

Men of Hawaii, Volume I

Men of Hawaii, Volume I

 

Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett from “The Story of Hawaii and Its Builders,” 1925.

ALSOBERRY KAUMU HANCHETT

City and County Physician

Member of a kamaaina family, Dr. A. K. Hanchett has been city and county physician of Honolulu since 1918. In practice he specializes in surgery.

Born in Lihue, Kauai, Nov. 16, 1885, Dr. Hanchett is the son of S. P. and Julia (Palaile) Hanchett. His grandfather, Salem Hanchett, located on the Island of Kauai in the early 40’s, coming to Hawaii from Massachusetts as captain of a whaling vessel.

Dr. Hanchett received his early education in Honolulu at the Kamehameha Schools. He received and A. B. degree at Harvard University in 1911, and, continuing his studies in the medical college of the same institution, took his M. D. degree in 1914. Dr. Hanchett entered private practise at Providence, R. I., remaining there for two years and returned to Hawaii in 1916. During the World War he was a major in the Medical Corps, stationed at Schofield Barracks and Fort Shafter.

Dr. Hanchett and Mary McGuire were married in Honolulu in 1917. They have four sons, Edwin Lani, William Kaumu, John Ikua and Richard Palea Hanchett. He is a member of the Medical Association of Hawaii, University and Civic Clubs of Honolulu.

[This comes from another awesome resource: The Story of Hawaii and Its Builders, with which is incorporated volume III Men of Hawaii; an historical outline of Hawaii with biographical sketches of its men of note and substantial achievement, past and present, who have contributed to the progress of the Territory, edited by George F. Nellist. Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Ltd., 1925. It is available in text form (minus the many picture portraits) here at the Hawaii USGenWeb Archives.]

(Story of Hawaii and Its Builders, 1925.)

Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett

The Story of Hawaii and Its Builders, p. 487

Nora Rickard of Honokaa turns 90, 1938.

Mother Rickard Celebrates her birthday

MRS. RICKARD

On Sunday, March 6, “Mother” Nora Rickard of Honokaa celebrated her 90th birthday, after living until local on the Island of Keawe for 71 years. She was born in Devonshire, England, and left there when she was 19 years old and went to America on a sailboat travelling under Cape Horn [Kaipo Hone], a trip that took five months.

“Mother” Rickard is the first white woman who lived in Honokaa. She is still strong and spry, even if she is very old. Pertaining to her trip from England, she says: Continue reading

Short biography of Jane Loeau by her husband, S. L. Kaelemakule, 1873.

A History of Jane Loeau.

In the year 1847, Jane Loeau was boarding at the school of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke [Kuke], and she married John Robert Jasper [Keoki-pu], and he died. In the year 1855 perhaps, she married Marvin Seger [Sika] [? Martin Seger], and he died. In the year 1862, she married me. We were together for 10 years, 7 months, and 25 days in the covenant of marriage in peace and happiness. We did not leave one another, but it was the angel of heaven who has separated us, and I live with sadness and never-ending regret.

She is one of the royal descendants of Hawaii nei, born of alii “Papa.” From ancient times, her rank was of royalty, but she humbled herself, befriended and warmly welcomed newcomers, she was loving, and she was kind in actions and words, and she was a follower of the Lord. In the year 1865, she joined the church at West Hamakua, Hawaii, and this past July, the Rev. J. Bicknell [Bikanele] released our covenant at Kawaiahao Church, to Rev. H. H. Parker [Paleka] [? ua hookuu mai la o Rev. J. Bikanele i ko maua berita ma ka ekalesia o Kawaiahao, ia Rev. H. H. Paleka.]. “Blessed are those who die in the Lord.” I composed this loving chant [kanaenae] for her below:

Ke aoa lani ulu haoa o ke kapu,
Ke aoa lani o Haholua o Palena,
O ke Kihenelani nei a Kauhi—e,
Na Kauhikealani o Kama,
Oia no—a.

Ka Punua ula ku i ka moku,
I hoopunanaia iloko o ka lani,
O ka lani me he aka la i ka wai,
He akamai i ke kui lani,
Kuiia ae kani kui hono i ka moku,
Ka mai kaupoa ma ke kua,
I ku ka hene ma ka houpo,
Poaha ia hemo ka Haku,
Ma ka manawa o ka ua kapu,
O Holani nui kaipo,
Ma ka loko mai o Holani na ‘lii,
Oia no—a.

Hoopuka i Nuuanu ka ua a ka makani,
Haiki ka pili hau i Kahaukomo,
Komo i na kiowai a ke Kiowao,
Aleale i ke alo ua o Lanihuli,
Hala i ka na’ki o Konahuanui,
Nui ka ua, mahimahi nui ka makani,
Na hookoikoi a ka waahia,
He hilahila oe ke hai mai—e,
Iini ana loko,
Oia no—a.

O Hanalei ua pehu ka lani,
Pohu ka lani, loloa ka opua,
Opua lani uli ku hakakai,
Kai ka ua e—e ua i ka liko,
A ka liko awe loloa ka ua iluna,
Lele pulelo iluna o ka lau o ka laau,
Ukuhi i na pakeke wai o Neki,
Piha Hilo ke kaheka kulu a ka wai,
Wahiaia aku la Waioli e ka ua,
Naha Hanalei ke kahe nei ke one,
Oia ua e—e ua i Hanalei,
Oia no—a.

Hanalei lani kupilikii, kupilikii mau a ka lani,
Huikau ae la he hooilo, mahiki mai la ka lehua,
Ka lehua hale, ka lehua makanoe,
Ka naele i o ia e ka wai ka lepo,
O Hiku iluna o Maunahina,
Kupeke, kapekepeke iluna o Hauai’liki,
Iliki ka noe, anu ka nahele,
He nahele anu, me ua hoa’la i na lae ino o ka moe,
E poi ana a ku he ‘hu,
Moe aku ka luhi i Kauakanana—e,
E hoonana ae ana i ka moe—e,
O oni mai auanei ma ka hope,
Mahope mai—a,
Oia no—a.

(To be continued.)

S. L. Kaelemakule.

Honolulu, August 6, 1873.

[I am not sure if there is a continuation to this.

S. L. Kaelemakule doesn’t live that many years after that. He dies on March 3, 1878, at Kepahoni, Honolulu.]

(Ko Hawaii Ponoi, 8/13/1873, p. 4)

He Moolelo no Jane Loeau.

Ko Hawaii Ponoi, Buke I, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Augate 13, 1873.

Kuakini, and Hawaiian tradition, 1845.

BIOGRAPHY OF KUAKINI.

Kuakini was the son of Keeaumoku, the son of Kalanikauleleiaiwi, the sister of Keawe. They are the royal ancestors of Hawaii Island’s high chiefs, Kuakini was befitting the class of high chiefs amongst Hawaii’s alii nui.

Kuakini was the son of Namahana who was born from Kalanikuihonoikamoku, and they are Maui’s royal ancestors, and therefore, Kuakini is amongst Maui’s…

…class of high chiefs; Kuakini was born as an alii.

Kuakini was born in the year 1792 perhaps; he was born in the year of [battle of] Kepuwahaulaula; at Keauhou in Kona in Hawaii was where he was born.

His caretaker [kahu hanai] was Kameheaiku, and Kuakini grew up at Keauhou, and he was made by his father, Keeaumoku, to pray to the wooden gods; this was Kuakini’s duties in his youth, the worship of the wooden gods.

He was the one who cared for all the temples in Kona, along with the Loulu temples, and in regard to his worshiping, one of the names Kuakini was called was Kiipalaoku, for Ku was the god for whom he would fetch pala fern.

Kuakini was a thinker from when he was small; he was meticulous; he often would sail boats with the other children in his youth, and when he grew up, he went with his parents to Maui, and thereafter he lived with Kamehameha I.

He became an aikane of Kamehameha I, because Kuakini possessed a fine body, he was skilled in English, he thought much about the way a body functions, he was sullen, and was a man of few words.

When Kamehameha I died, Liholiho them went to Oahu, and Kuakini was appointed Governor of Hawaii, and it was he that was to care for Hawaii until his recent death.

When Kuakini was assisting intently with the kingdom of God, it was he who built the great churches here on Hawaii Island.

O Armstrong [Limaikaika], please ask of Thurston [Tatina] or Bishop [Bihopa], for they know what he was like for both of them lived with him.

O Father Armstrong, I am living here on Hawaii these months, and will then return to Maui, or perhaps not. D. MALO.

(Nonanona, 1/7/1845, pp. 89–90)

KA MOOOLELO O KUAKINI.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 19, Aoao 89. Ianuari 7, 1845.

papa alii nui, he alii no o Kuakini...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 19, Aoao 90. Ianuari 7, 1845

Autobiography of Joseph Kawai Opunui, 1929.

THE STORY OF JOSEPH KAWAI OPUNUI AND HIS DESCENDANTS

Joseph Kawai Opunui was born on June 16, 1853 of Hapuku Opunui (m) and Kauhailama Waiwaiole (f) at Kalapana, Puna, Hawaii; and when he grew older, he would go around Kapoho, Puna; and when he was 15, came to Honolulu. Here he entered the English school at Kawaiahao in 1868, on the 3rd day of the month of May; David Malo was the teacher there. He stopped attending that school on July 20, 1870, and entered the Royal School of Kehehuna [Kula Alii o Kahehuna] in 1871. He left that school on April 6, 1872 and went to work for C. P. Ward [Ka Pepee] at Old Plantation as a grass cutter, as a pond worker at the pond of Koula, and as a coconut tree planter of the coconut grove growing there to the present.

He took a wife on October 6, 1873, and had his first child on September 29, 1874. My wife gave birth in Honolulu.

I took care of the jitney cart [kaa kika-ne] for my boss, Mr. Ward, for wages of four dollars a week. That was a lot of money in those days. After that, I went to work for Henry May & Co., food purveyors, weighing coffee, rice, sugar, potatoes, and so forth. They pay was ten dollars per week. I stayed with that employer until they merged with J. T. Waterhouse and McIntyer under the company name of Henry May & Co. It is still in operation today.

From there, I went to work for the government on roads for $1.25 a day, for 15 years. This was under the territory, and then 12 years under the county. I am retired now, but am receiving a pension.

This past 16th of June, I made 76 years old.

We have 1 son and 3 daughters from our loins;

Philamina, Joseph, Christina and Kealohapauole.

Philamina had 17 children. She was married twice. Her first husband was Herman Kaouli, and the second was William Keiki. With him she had six children, and with H. K. Ha’o she had eleven children.

The second child of Joseph Jr. died at the age of three.

One child is living in China. Kealohapauole is childless.

Between Philamina and Herman Kaouli, 2 children are living; with H. K. Ha’o, 2 children are living.

The first child is Margaret; the second child is Victoria. Margaret married J. Kaakua, and they had two children: Mary Laniwahine (deceased) and the second child, Hiram K. Kaakua.

Victoria married Isaac K. Kaawa and they had three children: Thomas K., Margaret Kahalelaulani, and Victoria.

The one living child of William K. Keiki is Clara, and she has five children: Philamina Nohokula, Manuel Kawai, Clara Hiilani, William Weheikekapu, and Frank.

Andrade is the name of Clara’s husband, and he is the father of those children.

I have three generations. With aloha.

Joseph Kawai Opunui

1805 Kalani St., Honolulu.

[I came across this interesting autobiography the other day. Usually, this type of information is submitted by someone else when a person dies, but here, Joseph Kawai Opunui is telling his own story.]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/27/1929, p. 4)

HE MOOLELO NO JOSEPH KAWAI OPUNUI AME KANA MAU MAMO

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 27, 1929.