The first newspaper article printed following July 31, 1843.

BATTLESHIP.

On the 26th of July, the British Warship named Dublin arrived. Rear Admiral Thomas is the Captain. He is the officer in charge of all of the British warships in the Pacific Ocean.

When he received documents pertaining to Capt. Lord George Paulet aboard Victoria’s ship, and he heard clearly that the British flag was raised over these islands, he came quickly to restore the government to Kamehameha III. How fine is his aloha for the king, isn’t it! and for the citizens as well.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 25)

MOKU MANUWA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.

Donations for the commission carrying the anti-annexation petitions to America, 1898.

OLIVE LEAVES OF ALOHA

FOR THE REPRESENTATIVES

FROM BALDWIN HOME

We are the Aloha Aina boys whose hearts are full of true aloha from deep within.

We are donating our few cents for the well-being of the Representatives with unified hearts and to attest to this, we affix our names.

MOLOKAI.

B. Lapilio, 50 cents

Nakeu, 50 ”

Halekauhola, 50 ”

E. D. T. Sing, 50 ”

John Lono, 50 ”

Moluhi, 50 ”

John Hao, 50 ”

Kukaukama, 50 ”

Kaomea Kaui, 50 ”

J. Namaielua, 50 ”

Jeo Kahilahila, 50 ”

Kalua, 50 ”

Mahi Kaio, 50 ”

S. Pilipo, 50 ”

Kauluwehiwehi, 50 ”

Hanaole, 50 ”

Micah Kaui, 50 ”

Kalauahea, 50 ”

Pohano, 50 ”

Kaukua, 50 ”

Kihauna, 50 ”

Ake, 50 ”

Hoopii, 50 ”

Moses Holi, 50 ”

S. Kauhahaa, 50 ”

Pihana, 50 ”

Isaia Wai, 50 ”

Pali, 50 ”

Hukia, 25 ”

Kanakahoa, 25 ”

Lai Kilauea, 25 ”

John Papu, 10 ”

Hakau, 10 ”

Kaonohiliilii, 10 ”

Kahikina, 1.00 ”

John Haloi, 1.00 ”

J. K. Laanui, 1.95 ”

D. W. J. Kaopuiki, 1.00 ”

Total: $20.00

D. W. J. Kaopuiki

Committee.

The boys of Baldwin Home are speedy.

[The newspaper Ka Loea Kalaiaina (and many other Hawaiian-Language Newspapers) are for some reason still not available online in searchable text form or even in image form. This is unfortunate, for although most people are familiar with the anti-annexation petitions (“Kū‘ē Petitions”), many have not seen the many lists of donations collected from all over the islands for the expenses of the commission carrying the petition to Washington D. C.

This particular list of donors and donations are from Kalawao! These patients were forced to live isolated from mainstream society, and yet they remained staunch patriots!!

This image is difficult to read, and I hope that clear images of these pages will be made, so if they are typed out to be word-searchable online, people will be able to find their kupuna—it will be near impossible to find a name if there is an “@” somewhere within it…]

(Loea Kalaiaina, 3/14/1898, p. 3)

KALAU OLIWA A KE ALOHA

Ka Loea Kalaiaina, Buke II, Helu 11, Aoao 3. Maraki 14, 1898.

Excerpts of “Strangling Hands…” appearing in the Hawaiian-Language Newspaper. 1897.

NA LIMA KAKAUHA MALUNA O KA PUA-I O KEKAHI LAHUI.

[This article is taken from the famed “Strangling Hands upon a Nation’s Throat” article by Miriam Michelson, which appears in the San Francisco Call, 9/30/1897, pp. 1–3. The introductory paragraphs go:]

For the benefit of our readers, we are taking some ideas printed in the newspaper San Francisco Call, written by the pen of Miss Miriam Michelson, on the deck of the ship, Australia, on the 22nd of September.

Remember that this woman newspaper reporter was the woman reporter present at the meeting of the Patriotic League of Hilo held at the meeting house of the Salvation Army in Hilo Town, and this is what she reported: . . .

(Aloha Aina, 10/16/1897, pp. 6 & 7.)

NA LIMA KAKAUHA MALUNA O KA PUA-I O KEKAHI LAHUI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 42, Aoao 6. Okatoba 16, 1897.

Mai ka aoao eono mai.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 42, Aoao 7. Okatoba 16, 1897.

More on the lowering of the flag, 1898.

WHO HATH EARS TO HEAR, LET HIM HEAR.*

Being that in time that news reported of earlier will come, about the raising of the American Flag above Hawaii, from the authority of the Republic of America; and in regard to this, word is being sent out to my beloved nation of Patriots.

DECLARATION TO THE LAHUI.

To all Patriots, we pray [ke Ka o ia aku nei? ke Kalo ia aku nei?] that you will not visit nor approach the area where the American Flag will be raised; let everyone remain at their own Home, kneel and look to the almighty one to ask for his help for the Hawaiian Nation, Land, and Kingdom.

All heads and leaders of the men’s and women’s Ahahui Aloha Aina [Hawaiian Patriotic League] and Hui Kalaiaina [Hawaiian Political Association], are directed to heed this as well.

JAMES K. KAULIA.

President.

*Mataio (Matthew) 13:9.

(Aloha Aina, 8/6/1898, p. 4)

O KA MEA PEPEIAO LOHE E HOOLOHE IA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 32, Aoao 4. Augate 6, 1898.

Hawaiians and the lowering of the flag, 1898.

WILL THE ONE WHO LOWERS THE FLAG BE A HAWAIIAN?

There is much talk going around these days about this disturbing subject, that some native Hawaiians are being asked to carry out this deed when the time comes, that being the 12th of this month.

The kanaka Hawaii maoli who agrees to do this vile act, betraying the Beloved Flag of his homeland, should think carefully, and set his eyes upon the Beautiful Hawaiian Flag as the wafts of breeze softly unfurls the Hawaiian Flag upon its throne, that being top of the flag pole, before he rushes to carry out the traitorous orders of the cowards who are full of evil.

Let us leave to the American haole and the American descendants the carrying out of this act, so that the consequences fall on the haole and not on the Hawaiians.

Remember this: “It is not upon the chief priests of the Jews of those days past that befell the bitter end for their pushing Judas Iscariot to betray the Lord Jesus. But the horrible end fell upon Judas for that deed of the chief priests, and not upon them. It was Judas’ bowels that gushed out, and not that of the people who urged him on.

This will be the same, O Beloved Hawaiian people, and the haole is taking by force from you Beloved Hawaii.

Leave it to the haole to take down the Beloved Flag of Hawaii.

Edward Kekoa.

(Aloha Aina, 8/13/1893, p. 2)

HE KANAKA HAWAII ANA ANEI KA MEA NANA E HUKI KA HAE HAWAII ILALO

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 33, Aoao 2. Augate 13, 1898.

Hawaiian-Language Newspapers and the past and the future, 1906.

The History of Your Native Land.

As we contemplate the main reason for the falling far behind of the Hawaiian people in matters dealing with the history of their homeland, their lahui, and the alii of the land, we are all racked with intense pain at the haphazard and total lack of knowledge in this terribly important study; and it would not be wrong for us to say that it should be one of the first subjects that should be taught to the students at schools of higher education across the world; and it is said by the Orators that being knowledgeable in the History of your Motherland is the first step in Politics where you’d be able to fight for the good of the Rule of the Nation.

And understanding the histories of all Nations is what will prepare you to fight intelligently on legal grounds for the benefit of your lahui. In the teachings of the Great Book, in Jeremiah 6:16, Jehovah says to us:

“Stand ye in the ways and see and ask for the old paths. Where is the good way?”

O Lahui, how will we be able to ask of the right way if we do not know the old history of our Beloved Aina?

This lack of knowledge of the history of this people comes from not consistently reading the Hawaiian newspapers. Something frequently seen is one person buying a paper and reading it before his friends. They hear it but they don’t retain it like one who subscribes to the paper, who can re-read it at his leisure and thus commit to memory the information.

Learn from this instruction, and do as the haole, who buys his very own newspapers to educate himself in current events.

[The Hawaiian-Language Newspapers is a massive history book—a history on the most part told by Hawaiians living while the “history” was happening. As it was argued more than a hundred years ago, in order to fight for things like Sovereignty, Land, and Water, shouldn’t we know the history as told by Hawaiians? Perhaps we shouldn’t focus solely on what is written down in law books, but also on what Hawaiians actually said and did about these laws, about water rights, about land ownership, about fishing bans, etc., etc. etc.?

For sure this is no easy task. The original newspapers aren’t going to last forever. The current images for many of them are not totally clear (if there are images at all). They need to be word-searchable so that if you search for something, you will find it. There needs to be more people doing translations of them. But then again, Kamehameha Paiea didn’t exclaim, “Forward my younger brothers and drink of the sweet waters”…]

(Na’i Aupuni, 1/17/1906, p. 2)

Ka Moolelo o Kou Aina Oiwi.

Ka Na'i Aupuni, Buke I, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Ianuari 17, 1906.

Another flag story, 1893.

THE AMERICAN FLAG.

On this Saturday morning, an American Flag was seen above Puowaina fluttering proudly, and the pole upon which it was placed was that piece of metal of the Government Surveyors.

When people saw this astonishing thing, there were many questions, but no answers.

When the day progressed to 9 o’clock or more, it was seen now that the American Flag wasn’t there, and half an hour later, Samuela K. Kaloa arrived with that flag and said that this was the Flag that was up at Puowaina, and it was I who went and took it down.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 4/18/1893, p. 3)

KA HAE AMERIKA.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 686, Aoao 3. Aperila 18, 1893.