Zero to zero, Kamehameha vs St. Louis? 1926.

KAMEHAMEHA AND ST. LOUIS TIED.

Before a crowd of spectators estimated to number between twelve and thirteen thousand, the football teams of Kamehameha and Sana Lui stood upon the battlefield for the championship of the year, in the afternoon of this past Saturday, on the Kamehameha School field, without there being a victor between those teams; they were tied with no score on either side.

This game between the two teams were one of the most fierce seen in Honolulu nei, filled with emotion; and there were many behind each team, and the worry of a great many spectator was relieved because neither side took the victory for themselves. Continue reading

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Kamehameha vs Saint Louis, 1926.

Football Teams of Kamehameha and St. Louis at the Game on This Past Saturday

(Kuokoa, 11/25/1926, p. 2)

Na Hui Kinipopo Kamehameha me ke St. Louis...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXV, Helu 47, Aoao 2. Novemaba 25, 1926.

Kamehameha vs Punahou, 1919.

THIS IS A PICTURE OF THE FOOTBALL GAME BETWEEN THE BOYS OF KAMEHAMEHA AND PUNAHOU ON THIS PAST SATURDAY; IT WAS ONE OF THE MOST INTENSE GAMES SEEN; THE BOYS OF PUNAHOU RAN OFF WITH THE WIN FOR THEIR SIDE, AND THE CHAMPIONSHIP FOR THAT SPORT WENT TO PUNAHOU THIS YEAR.

(Kuokoa, 11/21/1919, p. 1)

O KE KII KEIA...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 47, Aoao 1. Novemaba 21, 1919.

Transfer of treasures of the National Museum to the Bishop Museum, 1891.

SLIPPING AWAY.

Barring any obstacles, during some of the days of this week, the location of the artifacts housed in the National Museum Office at Aliiolani Hale will be transferred to the Bishop Museum Office at Kamehameha School, to go under the care of Prof. W. S. Brigham of the Bishop Museum.

If the artifacts of the Nation are moved to their intended new nest, then that office will be open for other Government Agencies, like the Department of Land Survey, and its space will become an office for the two houses, and that is great because it is directly adjacent to the Attorney General’s Office; but this all depends on the decision of the one who sings.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/26/1891, p. 3)

E PAHEE ANA I KA WELOWELO.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 115, Aoao 3. Ianuari 26, 1891.

More on Emma Nakuina, W. T. Brigham, and the Bishop Museum, 1897.

NOT COURTEOUS

Treatment of Ladies at Bishop Museum.

An Open Protest to the Trustees of the Kamehameha Schools.

MR. EDITOR:—The undersigned with three other ladies, Hawaiians of the highest respectabily, standing and position, with five little children, were sitting this morning in the shade of the Kamehameha Museum enjoying the fine showing made by the naval men drilling on the College campus. Chairs had been offered by a Kamehameha graduate, he placing them on the grass plot adjoining the Museum. After a little while, Mr. Brigham, the curator of the Museum, drove by within a few feet of us. He scowled most savagely at us. In a few minutes a Portuguese workman came to order us away from the place.

As it has invariably been the custom to throw the College grounds open to the public when any sort of a public or semi-public show is taking place within its precincts, we did not pay any attention to his orders, thinking it a piece of officiousness on the part of an ignorant person, and the man went away. After a while the man re-appeared and ordered us off again, saying he was acting by Brigham’s orders, and to use force if necessary. He took hold of the chair of the wife of a prominent official and tipped it partly over. She sprang up to avoid a fall, as did two other ladies. I, being at the very corner of the building and a little in advance of the others did not perceive the man until he had taken hold of my chair and had partly spilled me on my knee. I turned around to protest, when he grabbed my arm and pulled me out of my chair, saying “you get out of this, those are my orders from Mr. Brigham. If you don’t go yourself, I make you go. Mr. Brigham don’t allow any one to get on this grass.”

There were quite a number of carriages standing around, occupied by spectators of the drill.

The actions of the Portuguese were so rough and insulting that the attention of quite a number were attracted to our forcible ejectment. Continue reading

Construction of the Bishop Museum, 1889.

SLABS FROM A HEIAU.

The Kinau brought this morning two slabs from a heathen temple or heiau at Kapoho, Puna, Hawaii. They are to be placed in the Bishop Museum now in course of erection at the Kamehameha school grounds. Some of the stones in this same temple had a mark of a cross on them, supposed to have been made by the Spaniards when voyaging to these islands years and years ago.

(Daily Bulletin, 5/29/1889, p. 3)

SLABS FROM A HEIAU.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume XIV, Number 2262, Page 3. May 29, 1889.

James A. E. Kinney and his ohana, 1943.

At Sea

The picture above is of James A. E. Kinney, the son of K. W. Kinney of Hana, Maui, and one of the writers to Ka Hoku o Hawaii. It is believed that A. E. Kinney is at Sea with the Air Force, doing air surveillance [kilo ea]. He graduated from the air surveillance school in Grand Rapids, Michigan this past April and returned to his post at West Palm Beach, Florida, and thereafter it was decided to send him to sea.

A Hawaiian Youth

James Apollo Everett Kinney was born of the loins of Mr. K. W. [Kihapiilani William] and Mrs. Sarah Kaleo Kinney, at the McBryde Sugar Plantation in Kauai, when his father was working burning cane, and he was 32 years old. Continue reading