Words of praise for C. R. Bishop on today, his birthday, 1896.

MEMORIALS.

….¹

There are many kinds of memorials [kia hoomanao] to remember people by. A person is remembered for his deeds, in memorials built as pillars and monuments, in reminiscences, and preserved in the hearts of the many. Famous deeds of people are remembered with aloha for the good, and with scorn for the bad.

Queen Liliuokalani’s beloved efforts stand today as the Hui Hoonaauao i na Opio [Liliuokalani Educational Society].

The epitome of great deeds of these past days was done by a haole who lived here as a malihini and married one of the Princesses amongst the royal youth. Charles R. Bishop built the Kamehameha Schools, the memorial for his wife, the Alii Pauahi Bishop; and by this act of commemoration, a memorial now stands for all of the Kamehamehas, and it is impossible to forget their name.

 In the days when this haole friend was living here in Hawaii, he was often criticized for his stinginess and defiance by Hawaiian and haole alike, but he paid no care to this criticism. He continued with his work, ate healthily, [illegible digital image], until he was a rich man; but in all the criticism for him, there is no way that it could be said that he was a scoundrel or that he cheated someone; and this says a lot for his uprighteousness.

Likewise with his charity work, he acted with maturity and kindness without end in his steadfast support for the benefit of this lahui. In giving, he was not frivolous in his giving, but gave wisely. He donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to the Punahou College and to the Kamehameha Schools, from his own estate and from that of his wife’s; and from his own, also benefited were the Boarding School for  Boys and Girls. How wondrous is God in his passing down the great entire wealth of the Kamehamehas from one to another until it all came down to Keelikolani and then to Pauahi, the grandchildren of the first born of Kamehameha Nai Aupuni; and it was the last of the two, the one most knowledgeable of them all, as measured by their final deeds, which she created with her husband as a memorial for all of the Kamehamehas. This man was of a great mind in his carrying out meticulously this work which he and his wife discussed between themselves, without misappropriating a single parcel of land included in the estate of his wife, but instead he was conscientious and included his own estate. When put together with all the other beloved deeds by everyone in Hawaii nei, this is measured as the most wise of them all, the height and breadth of its foundation will go on and bear forth much benefits for this lahui. There is but yet one thing to complete and to perfect the building of this memorial to the Kamehamehas, that being the righteousness of God’s words, the basis upon which the good and the blessings of the lahui will continue.

But Bishop’s help for our people is not done in his continued assistance to the memorial to the Kamehamehas and their foster children [keiki hookama] in the covenant of marriage of Charles R. Bishop.

¹The first paragraph was left out because it was somewhat irrelevant to this particular post, and was commentary on J. Kekipi and the Christian Science [Hoomana Karistiano Naauao] faith.

(Oiaio, 2/21/1896, p. 2)

NA KIA HOOMANAO.

Ka Oiaio Puka La, Buke I, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Feberuari 21, 1896.

Marriage of Pauahi and Charles Reed Bishop, 1850.

Queen Liliuokalani reminisces in “Hawaii’s Story”:

“[Bernice] was one of the most beautiful girls I ever saw; the vision of her loveliness at that time can never be effaced from remembrance; like a striking picture once seen, it is stamped upon memory’s page forever. She married in her eighteenth year. She was betrothed to Prince Lot, a grandchild of Kamehameha the Great; but when Mr. Charles R. Bishop pressed his suit, my sister smiled on him, and they were married. It was a happy marriage.

[I was going to put up an article from the newspapers announcing their wedding, but it seems that there are none online. As for the Polynesian, the issues from March 23 to May 11, 1850 are missing. For the Honolulu Times which begins in 1849, there are none online at this time. The Hawaiian-Language Newspaper, Elele, is not currently available online (or on microfilm) after Augate 14, 1849. And it doesn’t seem to be covered in The Friend, which can be found here online through the efforts of the Mission Houses Museum.

150 years ago—The beginnings of the Kaahumanu Society, 1864.

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

I am V. K. Kaninaulani, along with A. Pauahi,¹ and L. Kamakaeha, are the Officers of this Association, of the Town of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Because of our desire to announce this fine endeavor amongst ourselves and the people, we come together to undertake these tasks.

CONSTITUTION.

Clause I. This Association was established at Kawaiahao, Honolulu, on this day the 8th of August, 1864. This Association is officially called, “Ahahui Kaahumanu.”

Clause II. The Officers of this Association are the President, the Vice President, the Secretary, the Vice Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause III. This Association was established to assist each other member of this Association when they are in need (in sickness, poverty, and death)

Clause IV. The yearly meeting of this Association will be on the second Monday of August of each year, and a yearly Banquet will be held on the last day of August every year in Honolulu nei, at the location designated.

Clause V. The Association will supply Record Books [Buke Oihana] of the Association, as well as any other expenses for the President, Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause VI. The President will select Executive Committees for this Association, and they will prepare lists of names of those who want to present themselves before the Association.

Clause VII. Should a member of this Association die, then the President or if not the President, then a representative will order by Executive Committee to gather in mourning attire at the place of the deceased for the funeral over her body.

Clause VIII. The President of this Association is empowered to establish other Associations on the other islands of this Nation.

Clause IX. The Association shall resolve all problems and difficulties brought before it from other lands.

Clause X. The Treasurer may expend all funds at her disposal with the approval of the President.

Clause XI. Members of this Association shall pay a dollar and a half ($1.50) yearly, or installments of an eighth ($0.12.1-2) every month; it is not prohibited to give more.

Clause XII. Clauses of this Constitution may be changed after one year.

¹Pauahi is often referred to as A. Pauahi. [Would there be anyone who knows what that initial stands for?]

(Kuokoa, 8/20/1864, p. 4)

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 34, Aoao 4. Augate 20, 1864.

One more on the passing of Jane Loeau, 1873.

The Death of Jane Loeau.

On Wednesday, July 30, Mrs. Jane Loeau Kaelemakule died, at Puunui, in this town. She died quickly; she had a pain in her chest after bathing in water; this is the ailment she died of, while still strong in body. She was born in Waimea, Kauai, in the year 1828, therefore she was 45 years old when she died. Her rank and ancestry is very famous in the history of succession of alii of Hawaii nei. Her father was Kalaniulumoku, and Liliha was her mother. On her mother’s side, it can be said that she was a great-granddaughter [moopuna kualua] of Kamehameha I. Here is clarification: Kamehameha lived with Kualii (f) and bore Loeau (the first) (f). Koakanu lived with Loeau (the first) and bore Liliha, the mother of Jane Loeau. During her childhood, she was educated under the teaching of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, and she was a schoolmate of the past two Monarchs who passed away as well as our present King, and also the royal descendants living today. Her passing may not be something that will greatly mourned by the people, as that blossom was plucked from the generation of alii; however, it is the moolelo of her ancestry that will show us these features [? na ka moolelo o kona hanauna e hoike mai ia kakou i na hiohiona i like pela]. Being that:

“Ua hala ka pili ka owa o Hakalau,
Hala ke kaha, ke ohi kumano ia mano,
I Kaumakaamano i ke kapu ka ai,
I ka ouli maka o Hanaimalama,
Ke ohi la i ka liko lau o ke Pahili,
I Hili mo—e, i Hili pawa, o Hele—i—pa—wa,
Mea e ka hele a hoi mai e,
E waiho ia hoi ka hele a kipakuia—a.

(Ko Hawaii Ponoi, 8/6/1873, p. 2)

Ka make ana o Jane Loeau.

Ko Hawaii Ponoi, Buke I, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Augate 6, 1873.

Short biography of Jane Loeau by her husband, S. L. Kaelemakule, 1873.

A History of Jane Loeau.

In the year 1847, Jane Loeau was boarding at the school of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke [Kuke], and she married John Robert Jasper [Keoki-pu], and he died. In the year 1855 perhaps, she married Marvin Seger [Sika] [? Martin Seger], and he died. In the year 1862, she married me. We were together for 10 years, 7 months, and 25 days in the covenant of marriage in peace and happiness. We did not leave one another, but it was the angel of heaven who has separated us, and I live with sadness and never-ending regret.

She is one of the royal descendants of Hawaii nei, born of alii “Papa.” From ancient times, her rank was of royalty, but she humbled herself, befriended and warmly welcomed newcomers, she was loving, and she was kind in actions and words, and she was a follower of the Lord. In the year 1865, she joined the church at West Hamakua, Hawaii, and this past July, the Rev. J. Bicknell [Bikanele] released our covenant at Kawaiahao Church, to Rev. H. H. Parker [Paleka] [? ua hookuu mai la o Rev. J. Bikanele i ko maua berita ma ka ekalesia o Kawaiahao, ia Rev. H. H. Paleka.]. “Blessed are those who die in the Lord.” I composed this loving chant [kanaenae] for her below:

Ke aoa lani ulu haoa o ke kapu,
Ke aoa lani o Haholua o Palena,
O ke Kihenelani nei a Kauhi—e,
Na Kauhikealani o Kama,
Oia no—a.

Ka Punua ula ku i ka moku,
I hoopunanaia iloko o ka lani,
O ka lani me he aka la i ka wai,
He akamai i ke kui lani,
Kuiia ae kani kui hono i ka moku,
Ka mai kaupoa ma ke kua,
I ku ka hene ma ka houpo,
Poaha ia hemo ka Haku,
Ma ka manawa o ka ua kapu,
O Holani nui kaipo,
Ma ka loko mai o Holani na ‘lii,
Oia no—a.

Hoopuka i Nuuanu ka ua a ka makani,
Haiki ka pili hau i Kahaukomo,
Komo i na kiowai a ke Kiowao,
Aleale i ke alo ua o Lanihuli,
Hala i ka na’ki o Konahuanui,
Nui ka ua, mahimahi nui ka makani,
Na hookoikoi a ka waahia,
He hilahila oe ke hai mai—e,
Iini ana loko,
Oia no—a.

O Hanalei ua pehu ka lani,
Pohu ka lani, loloa ka opua,
Opua lani uli ku hakakai,
Kai ka ua e—e ua i ka liko,
A ka liko awe loloa ka ua iluna,
Lele pulelo iluna o ka lau o ka laau,
Ukuhi i na pakeke wai o Neki,
Piha Hilo ke kaheka kulu a ka wai,
Wahiaia aku la Waioli e ka ua,
Naha Hanalei ke kahe nei ke one,
Oia ua e—e ua i Hanalei,
Oia no—a.

Hanalei lani kupilikii, kupilikii mau a ka lani,
Huikau ae la he hooilo, mahiki mai la ka lehua,
Ka lehua hale, ka lehua makanoe,
Ka naele i o ia e ka wai ka lepo,
O Hiku iluna o Maunahina,
Kupeke, kapekepeke iluna o Hauai’liki,
Iliki ka noe, anu ka nahele,
He nahele anu, me ua hoa’la i na lae ino o ka moe,
E poi ana a ku he ‘hu,
Moe aku ka luhi i Kauakanana—e,
E hoonana ae ana i ka moe—e,
O oni mai auanei ma ka hope,
Mahope mai—a,
Oia no—a.

(To be continued.)

S. L. Kaelemakule.

Honolulu, August 6, 1873.

[I am not sure if there is a continuation to this.

S. L. Kaelemakule doesn’t live that many years after that. He dies on March 3, 1878, at Kepahoni, Honolulu.]

(Ko Hawaii Ponoi, 8/13/1873, p. 4)

He Moolelo no Jane Loeau.

Ko Hawaii Ponoi, Buke I, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Augate 13, 1873.

More on the passing of Jane Loeau, 1873.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

At 11:30 in midday, on this past Wednesday, July 30th, Mrs. Jane Loeau Kaelemakule died, one of the royal descendants, at Puiwa, Nuuanu, at perhaps 27 years old. In the evening of this past Thursday, her body was taken and buried at the cemetery of Kawaiahao.

(Kuokoa, 8/2/1873, p. 2)

Ma ka hora 11 1/2...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XII, Helu 31, Aoao 2. Augate 2, 1873.

More on Jane Loeau’s passing, 1873.

Death of a Chiefess.—Jane Loeau, a descendant in the female line of the ancient chiefs of Kauai, and a reputed granddaughter of Kamehameha I., died suddenly in this city on Wednesday last. She was 45 years of age, and was in childhood an inmate of the Chief’s school under the charge of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, at the same time with Kamehameha IVth and Vth and His present Majesty.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 8/2/1873, p. 3)

Death of a Chiefess.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XVIII, Number 5, Page 3. August 2, 1873.

One of the early students at the Chiefs’ Children’s School, Jane Loeau, dies, 1873.

Passed On.—On the morning of the 30th of July, Jane Loeau left this life, and her spirit returned to He who made it. Loeau reached the age of 45; she is of an alii family of Kauai, and it is said that she was a grandchild of Kamehameha I.

(Ka Lau Oliva, 8/1/1873, p. 2)

Ua Hala.

Ka Lau Oliva, Buke III, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Augate 1, 1873.

Seizaburō Shimizu, 1908.

After finding out what the given name of the Consul General from Japan was in 1895, it was easier to find other information about him, like this picture from the Chicago Daily News. It seems he served as Japanese Consul in Chicago a few years after leaving Hawaii.

Seizaburo Shimizu, Chicago Daily News negatives collection, DN-0006102. Courtesy of Chicago History Museum, found on “American Memory from the Library of Congress.”

This can be found here: http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?cdn:1:./temp/~ammem_yyAd::

Consul General from Japan, S. Shimizu, found, 1895 / 2014.

With the kind help of Bishop Museum volunteer Mr. K. Suzuki, the mystery is solved. The Consul General Representative for 1895 from Japan here in Hawaii nei who appears in “Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen” was Seizaburō Shimizu.

[As per a listing of the Japanese consul generals stationed in Honolulu, which is printed in Sōga, Yasutarō. 1953. Gojūnenkan no Hawai Kaiko. Tokyo: Kankōkai.]