Alekoki, 1896.

KAHI WAI O ALEKOKI.

(An expression of affection by King Kalakaua.)

Aole i manaoia
Kahi wai o Alekoki
Hookohu ka ua iuka
Noho mai la i Nuuanu
Anuanu makehewa au
Ke kali ana ilaila
Kai no paha ua paa
Kou manao ia nei
Au i hoomalu ai
Hoomalu oe a malu
Ua malu keia kino
Mamuli o ko leo
Kau nui aku ka manao
Kahi wai o Kapena
Pania paa ia mai
Na manowai o uka
Ahuwale na kiowai
Na papahele o luna
Maluna ae no au
Ma na rumi liilii
Ma na keena o waho
A waho o Mamala
Hao mai nei ehuehu
Pulu au i ka huna kai
Kai he’ahe’a i ka ili
Hookahi no koa nui
Nana e alo ia ino
Inoino mai nei luna
I ka hao a ka makani
He makani ahailono
Lohe ka luna i Pelekane
Oia pouli nui
Mea ole i kuu manao
I o ia nei au
Ka piina o Maemae
E kilohi au o ka nani
Na pua i Maunaala
He ala onaona kou
Ke pili mai ia nei
Aole i billwi ia [Aole i biliwi ia]
Kahi pali o Leahi
Ku kilakila i ka lai
Lai hohola i ke pili
Pili paa o Kawaihoa
Hoa oe o ka inoino
O oe owau kekahi
Pau keia pilikia

(Leo o ka Lahui, 2/3/1896, p. 3)

KAHI WAI O ALEKOKI.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 1390, Aoao 3. Feberuari 3, 1896.

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In anticipation of King Kalakaua’s return from his tour around the world, 1881.

HONORING THE ALII, KING KALAKAUA.

All of the Associations, the Secret Societies, on this island of Oahu, and the other islands, people of all ethnicities, who want to join in giving glory by putting up arches and other public displays from the wharf of Ainahou until the Palace grounds, are ordered to appear before H. A. P. Carter, the Chairman of the Welcoming Committee and the Exaltation Committee. The Associations, the Secret Societies, and those who want to join in the parade of the day, notify CAPT. TRIPP or

J. U. Kawainui,

The Marshals of the Day.

[In “Hawaii’s Story,” Liliuokalani looks back to the day of her brother’s return:

“…With that enthusiasm always shown by the Hawaiian people in doing honor to their sovereigns, the grandest preparations were made throughout the islands to welcome the arrival of the king. In Honolulu the joy was general, and the foreign element was well represented in the festivities. The streets were given up to the people, and and were crowned with triumphal arches. Before the day of his expected landing at the wharf, the most elaborate preparations had been made to give him a royal greeting. The mottoes, in the selection of which numberless parties had consulted me, were displayed in every part of the city, and there was an especial arch designed for each district of the island of Oahu.]

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 10/8/1881, p. 2)

KA HOOHANOHANO I KE ALII KA MOI KALAKAUA.

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 41, Aoao 2. Okatoba 8, 1881.

More on Mrs. Heleluhe going to take the place of Kahele Nahaolelua, and name variations, 1897.

MRS. HELELUHE HEADED FOR AMERIKA.

Because Mrs. Kahele Nahaolelua has been away from the presence of the Queen due to her illness, Mrs. Vakeki Heleluhe has been ordered to  seek out the Royal One in Washington; she will be leaving the mother land on the Australia of this next Wednesday, May 5th, for the skin-nipping cold of America, and while she is treads through San Francisco, her care will be under the guidance of J. A. Palmer [Pama], the Queen’s secretary. And for you, O Mrs. Vakeki Heleluhe, is our prayer, that your ocean voyage be accompanied by God’s protection and may he put you ashore on dry land in good health, and may he be with you on water and on land. And when you meet with the Heavenly Alii of the lahui, give the royal one our great aloha.

[According to David Forbes, from the new edition of “Hawaii’s Story,” Mrs. Heleluhe was sometimes referred to as “Waikiki”. Here we see her as “Vakeki”.

See another article on Mrs. Heleluhe’s departure here.

Also, to be added to the index of the new edition should be:

Heleluhe, Wakeke Ululani, 106, 258, 338, 385, 391]

(Aloha Aina, 5/1/1897, p. 6)

MRS. HELELUHE NO AMERIKA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 18, Aoao 6. Mei 1, 1897.

Words of praise for C. R. Bishop on today, his birthday, 1896.

MEMORIALS.

….¹

There are many kinds of memorials [kia hoomanao] to remember people by. A person is remembered for his deeds, in memorials built as pillars and monuments, in reminiscences, and preserved in the hearts of the many. Famous deeds of people are remembered with aloha for the good, and with scorn for the bad.

Queen Liliuokalani’s beloved efforts stand today as the Hui Hoonaauao i na Opio [Liliuokalani Educational Society].

The epitome of great deeds of these past days was done by a haole who lived here as a malihini and married one of the Princesses amongst the royal youth. Charles R. Bishop built the Kamehameha Schools, the memorial for his wife, the Alii Pauahi Bishop; and by this act of commemoration, a memorial now stands for all of the Kamehamehas, and it is impossible to forget their name.

 In the days when this haole friend was living here in Hawaii, he was often criticized for his stinginess and defiance by Hawaiian and haole alike, but he paid no care to this criticism. He continued with his work, ate healthily, [illegible digital image], until he was a rich man; but in all the criticism for him, there is no way that it could be said that he was a scoundrel or that he cheated someone; and this says a lot for his uprighteousness.

Likewise with his charity work, he acted with maturity and kindness without end in his steadfast support for the benefit of this lahui. In giving, he was not frivolous in his giving, but gave wisely. He donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to the Punahou College and to the Kamehameha Schools, from his own estate and from that of his wife’s; and from his own, also benefited were the Boarding School for  Boys and Girls. How wondrous is God in his passing down the great entire wealth of the Kamehamehas from one to another until it all came down to Keelikolani and then to Pauahi, the grandchildren of the first born of Kamehameha Nai Aupuni; and it was the last of the two, the one most knowledgeable of them all, as measured by their final deeds, which she created with her husband as a memorial for all of the Kamehamehas. This man was of a great mind in his carrying out meticulously this work which he and his wife discussed between themselves, without misappropriating a single parcel of land included in the estate of his wife, but instead he was conscientious and included his own estate. When put together with all the other beloved deeds by everyone in Hawaii nei, this is measured as the most wise of them all, the height and breadth of its foundation will go on and bear forth much benefits for this lahui. There is but yet one thing to complete and to perfect the building of this memorial to the Kamehamehas, that being the righteousness of God’s words, the basis upon which the good and the blessings of the lahui will continue.

But Bishop’s help for our people is not done in his continued assistance to the memorial to the Kamehamehas and their foster children [keiki hookama] in the covenant of marriage of Charles R. Bishop.

¹The first paragraph was left out because it was somewhat irrelevant to this particular post, and was commentary on J. Kekipi and the Christian Science [Hoomana Karistiano Naauao] faith.

(Oiaio, 2/21/1896, p. 2)

NA KIA HOOMANAO.

Ka Oiaio Puka La, Buke I, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Feberuari 21, 1896.

Marriage of Pauahi and Charles Reed Bishop, 1850.

Queen Liliuokalani reminisces in “Hawaii’s Story”:

“[Bernice] was one of the most beautiful girls I ever saw; the vision of her loveliness at that time can never be effaced from remembrance; like a striking picture once seen, it is stamped upon memory’s page forever. She married in her eighteenth year. She was betrothed to Prince Lot, a grandchild of Kamehameha the Great; but when Mr. Charles R. Bishop pressed his suit, my sister smiled on him, and they were married. It was a happy marriage.

[I was going to put up an article from the newspapers announcing their wedding, but it seems that there are none online. As for the Polynesian, the issues from March 23 to May 11, 1850 are missing. For the Honolulu Times which begins in 1849, there are none online at this time. The Hawaiian-Language Newspaper, Elele, is not currently available online (or on microfilm) after Augate 14, 1849. And it doesn’t seem to be covered in The Friend, which can be found here online through the efforts of the Mission Houses Museum.

150 years ago—The beginnings of the Kaahumanu Society, 1864.

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

I am V. K. Kaninaulani, along with A. Pauahi,¹ and L. Kamakaeha, are the Officers of this Association, of the Town of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Because of our desire to announce this fine endeavor amongst ourselves and the people, we come together to undertake these tasks.

CONSTITUTION.

Clause I. This Association was established at Kawaiahao, Honolulu, on this day the 8th of August, 1864. This Association is officially called, “Ahahui Kaahumanu.”

Clause II. The Officers of this Association are the President, the Vice President, the Secretary, the Vice Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause III. This Association was established to assist each other member of this Association when they are in need (in sickness, poverty, and death)

Clause IV. The yearly meeting of this Association will be on the second Monday of August of each year, and a yearly Banquet will be held on the last day of August every year in Honolulu nei, at the location designated.

Clause V. The Association will supply Record Books [Buke Oihana] of the Association, as well as any other expenses for the President, Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause VI. The President will select Executive Committees for this Association, and they will prepare lists of names of those who want to present themselves before the Association.

Clause VII. Should a member of this Association die, then the President or if not the President, then a representative will order by Executive Committee to gather in mourning attire at the place of the deceased for the funeral over her body.

Clause VIII. The President of this Association is empowered to establish other Associations on the other islands of this Nation.

Clause IX. The Association shall resolve all problems and difficulties brought before it from other lands.

Clause X. The Treasurer may expend all funds at her disposal with the approval of the President.

Clause XI. Members of this Association shall pay a dollar and a half ($1.50) yearly, or installments of an eighth ($0.12.1-2) every month; it is not prohibited to give more.

Clause XII. Clauses of this Constitution may be changed after one year.

¹Pauahi is often referred to as A. Pauahi. [Would there be anyone who knows what that initial stands for?]

(Kuokoa, 8/20/1864, p. 4)

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 34, Aoao 4. Augate 20, 1864.

One more on the passing of Jane Loeau, 1873.

The Death of Jane Loeau.

On Wednesday, July 30, Mrs. Jane Loeau Kaelemakule died, at Puunui, in this town. She died quickly; she had a pain in her chest after bathing in water; this is the ailment she died of, while still strong in body. She was born in Waimea, Kauai, in the year 1828, therefore she was 45 years old when she died. Her rank and ancestry is very famous in the history of succession of alii of Hawaii nei. Her father was Kalaniulumoku, and Liliha was her mother. On her mother’s side, it can be said that she was a great-granddaughter [moopuna kualua] of Kamehameha I. Here is clarification: Kamehameha lived with Kualii (f) and bore Loeau (the first) (f). Koakanu lived with Loeau (the first) and bore Liliha, the mother of Jane Loeau. During her childhood, she was educated under the teaching of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, and she was a schoolmate of the past two Monarchs who passed away as well as our present King, and also the royal descendants living today. Her passing may not be something that will greatly mourned by the people, as that blossom was plucked from the generation of alii; however, it is the moolelo of her ancestry that will show us these features [? na ka moolelo o kona hanauna e hoike mai ia kakou i na hiohiona i like pela]. Being that:

“Ua hala ka pili ka owa o Hakalau,
Hala ke kaha, ke ohi kumano ia mano,
I Kaumakaamano i ke kapu ka ai,
I ka ouli maka o Hanaimalama,
Ke ohi la i ka liko lau o ke Pahili,
I Hili mo—e, i Hili pawa, o Hele—i—pa—wa,
Mea e ka hele a hoi mai e,
E waiho ia hoi ka hele a kipakuia—a.

(Ko Hawaii Ponoi, 8/6/1873, p. 2)

Ka make ana o Jane Loeau.

Ko Hawaii Ponoi, Buke I, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Augate 6, 1873.