More on the Honorable Lilia Kamakaeha Paki’s marriage, 1862.

The Ones Who Were Married.

At 8 o’clock at night, on the 16th of this month, the Honorable Lilia Kamakaeha Paki was married to Adjutant General, Major John O. Dominis at Haleakala, the house of the Honorable C. R. Bishop and A. Pauahi Bishop. The ones who attended the royal bride were Elizabeth Kekaaniau Laanui and Martha Swinton; those attending the groom were the Honorable Colonel D. Kalakaua and William Allen [? William Allani] (of Kawaihae).

Present were the Chief, the King; her Highness Princess V. Kaahumanu, his Highness L. Kamehameha; the Honorable Governor Kekuanaoa; Colonel P. Y. Kekuaokalani; and the parents of the bride, and the parent and cousins of the groom.

The ones to be wed were gathered and they went out and entered the great parlor and it was there that the couple stood.

The uniting of the pair was done with much reverence, and all the proceedings of the wedding were fine, as well as with the attendants.

The Rev. C. Damon stood and began the marriage ceremony; then the ring and the marriage fee [? ka uku o ka mare ana] was given to the groom, from the groom to the bride, and from the bride to the Priest; the Priest took the fee and gave the ring once more to the groom, who put it on the brideʻs finger. When this was done, the groom was made to give his vow and then the bride. The couple were questioned, and then the two knelt down and Priest gave a prayer, and after the prayer, the Priest asked, “Who will give this woman to this man?” The Honorable C. R. Bishop stood and took the hand of the bride and gave it to the groom; the Honorable A. Pauahi Bishop, the parents of the couple and everyone else stood once more and approached. Everyone was full of joy for this beautiful wedding.

In midday of that very day, a party was given for their cortege, and all who found themselves amongst that fine gathering felt admiration.

After the marriage of the alii, the attendants returned to their sides until they reached Washington Place [Wasenetona Hale], the place of residence of the groom.

It is said that this is the second of the righteous marriages known in our tiny Kingdom, and by glancing through the gate, it is indeed righteous.

These are fine examples for those who are not married, so that the Royal family that associates with the multitudes will become numerous. There are but a few High Chiefs born of the land left, and with this marriage to a haole Royal one, it is hoped that the Royal couple live righteously along with the prayer that they bear good fruit of the sacred descent of the line of Heulu.

[Does anyone know if Pauahi had a name that started with an “A.”? For some reason she is here twice referred to as A. Pauahi Bihopa.]

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 9/18/1862, p. 2)

Na mea Mare.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika Buke I, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 18, 1862.

Queen Liliuokalani birthday celebration, 1911.

Birthday of Liliu.

On this past Saturday, September 2, it was the birthday of Queen Liliuokalani, and a royal audience was held midday of that day between 11 a. m. and 1 p. m. in the afternoon.

At 8 a. m. in the morning of this Saturday, the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] appeared at Washington Place [Wakinekona Home] and played Hawaiian songs which were composed by the alii during the Monarchy of Hawaii nei, and some of these songs were composed by Queen Liliuokalani. The Royal Hawaiian Band played for an hour in the morning to commemorate the birthday of Liliu at Washington Place, and they played once again from 11 midday to 1 in the afternoon.

At 11, the public was allowed to come and see the alii. The Kalama Society, Kaahumanu Society, and Kauikeaouli Society arrived to see the Queen.

The interior of Washington Place was decorated with kahili, just as during the era when the alii ruled—it was beautiful and awe inspiring to see that morning. The Queen sat upon her cotton chair [noho pulu], with two boys behind her chair, holding long kahili, with ahuula upon their shoulders. The Princess Kawananakoa was on the Queen’s right, and Colonel Iaukea was on her left, and he was the one who introduced the Queen to the malihini and to the townspeople. There also, were the heads of the Territory, County, and Federal government. There were many distinguished people of this town who went to see the alii, and by the looks of it, almost one thousand people came during this royal audience.

What shocked this reporter on that morning, was that two-thirds of the people who went to give their congratulations on the birthday of the Queen were malihini and haole. As for the true Hawaiians, only but a few went to see the alii. Reflecting back in time, and seeing Liliu in her finery, i am lulled into recalling the days when Hawaiians were proud upon the soil of their native land.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/8/1911, p. 4)

ka La Hanau o Liliu.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke IX, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.

More on Queen Liliuokalani and the Red Cross, 1917.

Liliuokalani Becomes Red Cross Member As Whistles Signify 8000 Mark Is Reached

Queen Liliuokalani receiving a Red Cross card from Mrs. Gerrit Wilder after her contribution of a $100 check to the fund.

Her Majesty Queen Liliuokalani today became a patron member of the American Red Cross.

Seated in her wheel chair on the broad lanai of her home at Washington Place she handed over to Mrs. Gerrit Wilder, chairman of Division No. 1, the hundred dollar check which gave her patron membership in the national organization. Mrs. Wilder in turn placed one of the little Red Cross cards in the venerable lady’s hands and thanked her for the generous gift.

“It is with the deepest appreciation that I accept this gift from you on behalf of the Red Cross,” said Mrs. Wilder. “This is another of your many deeds of kindness and generosity.”

Queen Liliuokalani bowed gently and a sweet smile came over her face. She spoke a word or two in answer, turning to Mrs. Wilder and to Mrs. William Todd and Mrs. E. White Sutton, the other member of the visiting committee.

Curtins P. Iaukea, the queen’s secretary, pointed to the card which she held, telling her that she was now a member of the organization for which it stood. People all over the city are giving to this cause, he said.

Just then another of the whistles that were announcing the swiftly increasing subscriptions began to blow. Col. Iaukea inquired and was told that this was the whistle signifying 8000 had been reached.

“That is 8000 now,” said the secretary. “Eight thousand members this morning.”

“Eight thousand,” said the queen, pronouncing the words slowly and distinctly, and her face lighted.

“And you are the eight thousandth,” Col. Iaukea told her.

Queen Liliuokalani was gowned this morning in black, with a small white shawl over her shoulders. About her neck was a beautiful pink and white lei of flowers, while a crown-shaped comb held her white hair.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 9/29/1917, p. 2)

Liliuokalani Becomes Red Cross Member As Whistles Signify 8000 Mark Is Reached

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7945, Page 2. September 29, 1917.

Queen Liliuokalani’s birthday celebrated at Washington Place, 1912.

LILIU’S BIRTHDAY CELEBRATED

The Queen Made Seventy-Four This Thursday.

FRIENDS CAME TO SEE HER

Those Who Extended Their Congratulations Were About Eight Hundred.

About eight-hundred or more kamaaina and malihini went on Monday to the home of Queen Liliuokalani, Washington Place [Wakinekona Hale], and gave their congratulations to the former Queen of Hawaii nei, for her reaching seventy-four years in age.

Present was Prince Kalanianaole and Princess Kalanianaole and also Princess Kawananakoa, who were there to assist the Queen in welcoming the visitors on that day.

The Queen’s home was decorated in flowers as was customary on her birthdays in the past and memories were stirred up of days when the alii of Hawaii nei were viewed with majesty in the minds of all Hawaii’s people.

The band was there entertaining the visitors; and from the Queen’s side, to welcome the guests, the responsibility went to Colonel Iaukea, assisted by Mr. Dominis and his aids, E. K. Lilikalani, James Hakuole, and Hiram Kolomoku.

The Queen is still in good health, however she is becoming frail, yet with patience she welcomed all the guests who visited her to extend their congratulations, and delightedly she extended her hand before those with whom she was familiar.

Just as it is with Hawaiians, who show their deference and affection for their royalty, like Liliu; so they did on this day, and this was followed as an example by some of the malihini, who bowed deeply and with affection, showing that the Queen’s position remained the same in the minds of the people even if she is left without her rights in ruling the nation.

Following the audience, each person signed their name in the book set aside for this occasion, and then the crowd left Washington Place for Waikiki where a luau was prepared to celebrate that unforgettable day.

(Kuokoa, 9/6/1912, p. 1)

HOOMANAOIA KA LA HANAU O LILIU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 36, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 6, 1912.

Queen Liliuokalani’s Birthday Celebration, 1912.

[Found under: “Various News”]

Sept. 2—Queen Liliuokalani held an audience with the public at her home, Washington Place, and there were a great many people who went to give their congratulations to her, being that this was her birthday. The Queen is somewhat frail, but she gave a kind smile to all who came to visit her.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 9/5/1912, p. 3)

Sept, 2—Ua haawi ae ka Moiwahin e...

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 7, Helu 14, Aoao 3. Sept. 5, 1912.

Liliuokalani Educational Society, 1890.

[Found under: “LOCAL & GENERAL NEWS”]

The First Division of the Liliuokalani Educational Society will meet at Washington Place, three [?] o’clock Monday afternoon.

[Granted, this is a single sentence, but there is not much known about the Liliuokalani Educational Society, and every little mention is important…

This newspaper is bilingual, Hawaiian and English, and is also called “The National Herald”. The images are not very clear, and the typescript as a result is riddled with “@”s, which indicate that the area is illegible. Hopefully they (and all of the other newspapers) can be re-shot so that there will be legible images—the information they hold is priceless!]

(Ahailono a ka Lahui, February 1, 1890, p. 5)

The First Division of the Liliuokalani Educational Society...

Ka Ahailono a ka Lahui, Volume 1, Number 20, Page 5. February 1, 1890.

Liliuokalani plays the first organ at Kawaiahao Church, 1867.

First Playing of the Organ of Kawaiahao Church.

At 10 in the morning of the 25th of December, the great musical instrument of Kawaiahao was played before the great crowd who gathered there to hear it being played for the first time. A great assortment of people came to hear and to see for themselves.

The Organ was played by the Princess, the Honorable Mrs. Lilia Kamakaeha Dominis, the royal leader of the Kawaiahao choir, and she was honored by her royal younger sister, Likelike, as well as the Honorable Mrs. Pauahi Bishop, who sat in the choir.

A song of gratitude was sung while the two pastors walked up to the pulpit, they being the Rev. E. Kekoa and the Kahu of the Church. The name of the hymn was “No Iehova ka Honua.”

After the singing of the hymn, nicely and fearlessly by the royal one who performed it, albeit this was the first time she played the organ before a crowd; then Rev. E. Kekoa stood and explained briefly the fulfilling of the dream of the Kawaiahao Choir, the church members, and the public, who helped with their 25¢ and their 12½¢ so that we could have this Great Instrument which is being played.

At the closing of this speech above, the Kahu of Kawaiahao stood and explained to all the birth of the King of kings, and the Lord of lords in the city of David, and expanded on things related to the birth of that Prince of Life.

At the conclusion of his speech, a hymn was given, and that alii lept into action, like she was very accustomed to it; and we are greatly appreciative for her advancement in musical instruments; and this was followed by a prayer, and then the congregation was released. The 7 foreign language speaking haole [?] gifted to Rev. H. H. Parker, $100.00 after the end of the prayer.

PRESENTING OF A GIFT.

After the congregation was let go, the Kawaiahao Choir went up to the Residence of their royal leader, to Washington Place, with a gift they wanted to present to her, a medal [?] bracelet with words engraved upon it, thusly:

“A GIFT
AN EXPRESSION OF ALOHA
BY
The Kawaiahao Choir
TO
MRS. LIDIA K. DOMINIS.”

which was [….] by W. Ka, and it was placed on the right hand of that royal one with the words below [….] by A. H[…..].

O Princess:
The Honorable
Mrs. Lilia K. Dominis.

Aloha oe:—We are your servants, the members of the Kawaiahao Choir, we show our aloha for you by presenting you with this gift of a small part of a Medal [?]; but it is not with thoughts of your servants, that their giving you this gift is something that should give you more honor, or that perhaps it will increase your already beautiful nature, but as a true expression of the things below:

One. We, your servants, the members of the Kawaiahao Choir, show our deep aloha to our Princess, and our Leader, with this small gift, as a symbol for your leaving your true Alii status [?]

Two. Your servants, the members of the Kawaiahao Choir, constantly think of your everlasting patience as you face the heavy rains of the winter, the scorching sun of the summer, the pitch dark nights of Town, and the bright moonlit nights, as you lead us in our Hymns.

And for these reasons, we ask of you, should your servants have the aloha of our Princess, the Honorable Mrs. Lilia K. Dominis, then let the Army of the wide Heavens watch over you. With aloha.

The Kawaiahao Choir.

Honolulu, Dec. 25, 1867.

—————

The Princess Replied Like This:

“I am joyful at your combined thought in gifting me with this present; it is a symbol of your true love for me.”

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1867, p. 3)

Ka Hookani mua ana o ka Ogana o ka Halepule o Kawaiahao.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 52, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 28, 1867.

Bullets stored on shore by men of the USS Boston during the overthrow?

Bullets Dug Up Hidden in Dirt.

After being hidden in dirt for many years, many bullets were uncovered: twenty, six, and three inches in length, behind 1319 Queen Emma Street. These are bullets thought to have been left by the rebels when Mr. Morgan was living there.

The hiding of these bullets were cloaked to Honolulu’s people, and it was not known that bullets were in that location until the land changed owners; while the dirt was being dug a little while ago to lay sewer pipes, a great number of bullets were dug up, and some were carried away by car for disposal because it was so heavy.

Amongst the old timers of Honolulu, Mr. W. G. Brash said, according to his recollection, all of those bullets were hidden underground twenty years ago.

He stated, according to what he remembered, those bullets were hidden where they were found, when the revolution in Honolulu was started, and when the warship Boston was in the harbor; and he believed that the bullets were transported from the warship and hidden in the dirt at the residence of Mr. W. J. Morgan, because he was one of the commissioners who oversaw safety [komisina kiai maluhia?].

He thinks the bullets were stored under the orders of Mr. Morgan, to save him should the soldiers of the queen stand in opposition.

However, when Mr. Brash was asked where the guns were to shoot the bullets, he explained that when an uprising broke out, it would be a very easy thing for the soldiers from the Boston to move to Mr. Morgan’s place, and being that the bullets were previously stored on shore, it would be short work to come down upon the troops of the queen encamped at Washington Place.

Some Hawaiians witnessed that Mr. Morgan’s place was being guarded, but the reason for this is only now clear; come to find out, there were bullets buried underground.

(Kuokoa, 4/30/1915, p. 3)

HUEIA HE MAU POKA I HUNAIA ILOKO O KA LEPO

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 18, Aoao 3, Aperila 30, 1915.