Opeapea from Hilea, 1887.

AN INTERESTING SPECIMEN.

By the W. G. Hall of last Wednesday, Mr. F. L. Clarke received from Mr. C. N. Spencer, of Hilea, a good specimen of a Hawaiian bat. The native name is “Opeapea” or “Olepe.” The specimen sent measures 6 inches from tip to tip of the extended wings. The body is about the size of that of a mouse. The ears are quite large in proportion to the head. The profile to the little fellow shows a “snub” nose, retreating forehead and wide mouth, in fact, it may be called an “ugly mug.” The specimen is preserved in alcohol, and will be placed in the National Museum.

(Daily Bulletin, 2/17/1887, p. 2)

AN INTERESTING SPECIMEN.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume XI, Number 1562, Page 2. February 17, 1887.

Pueo found in Kalihi, 1902.

SCARCE NATIVE OWLS ARE FOUND IN KALIHI VALLEY

THE HAWAIIAN OWL.  Photo by Williams.

A NEST of four baby owls was discovered about three months ago by Dr. George Huddy in the Kalihi valley behind his residence. The discovery of the quartette of owlets is important in that few of the species have been found in late years. Three of them died shortly after being taken into captivity, but the oldest of the lot lived and is growing into a fine bird, and is at present about the size of a small pullet. He is thoroughly domesticated and makes himself perfectly at home in the residence of Dr. Huddy, mingling with the people without fear.

The three dead ones were taken in charge by Mr. Bryan, Professor Brigham’s assistant at the Bishop Museum, and they are now stuffed and form a group with one brought to the museum about four years ago. It has been said at the museum that the owls are exceedingly rare and are valuable in the preserved state for the museum.

The pet eats mice as well as raw meat. Dr. Huddy was quite troubled as to the manner in which the owl digested the bones and was rewarded a short time ago when the owl retired to a corner and began retching. Soon a quantity of bones issued from his throat, and the youngster then resumed his eating of further food.

The owl is of the “horned” species. When approached by some one he does not know two groups of feathers on the back rise upward in a threatening manner and remain in that position until the stranger retires. If it is some one he knows the feathers fall back and he courts their attention.

The owner of the rare bird states that none of his family have known of the existence of such owls in the Kalihi valley for the past forty years. They were at one time plentiful. The native for the owl is pueo. When fully grown it is the size of a large hen or the alala, or crow. Its feathers are mottled, its eyes exceedingly large and the claws are sharp like those of a cat. In appearance the owl’s head is very much like that of a cat. It catches mice, small birds and young chickens, on which it lives. The feathers were formerly made into very handsome kahilis.

In ancient times the owl was thought to be a god and was worshipped by multitudes. Some families looked upon the appearance of an owl near their habitation as a warning of approaching death; others as the coming of good luck. On the hills back of Kalapu, in Manoa Valley, beyond the bluff on which the Castle residence is located, owls once inhabited the caves in great numbers.

One of the legends of Manoa Valley gives the owl great prominence as god. The legend of Kahalaopuna shows that the owl was looked upon as such, a certain owl being known as the guardian of the beautiful maiden.

[Does anyone know of kahili made with pueo feathers?]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 2/11/1902, p. 5)

SCARCE NATIVE OWLS ARE FOUND IN KALIHI VALLEY

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXVII, Number 12, Page 5. February 11, 1902.

 

Sweet love song, 1886.

Uhiwai O Kaiona

Auhea wale ana oe
E ka liko pua o Maleka
Mea e ka hikina mai
Hoolau kanaka i ka puuwai

Hui—Nawai e ole ke aloha
He uhi wai no Kaiona
Ua ona ia e na manu
Iiwi maka polena.

Pehea ka hali’a mae ole
E o mai nei i ka lihilihi
Palihi wale ka anoi
E lalawe nei i kuu kino.

Kawaihonakapu.

(Nupepa Elele, 7/24/1886, p. 4)

Uhiwai O Kaiona.

Ka Nupepa Elele, Buke VIII, Helu 4, Aoao 4. Iulai 24, 1886.

Fishing for oopu and wi in Puepaku, Hilo, 1878.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O PUEPAKU, HILO.” by J. Kanaeholo]

Fishing women.—The girls of this area [Pueopaku, Hilo], go fishing often for oopu with small arched nets at the river in the daytime, and at night they go down to pick the famous wi of Hilo. They head down to Papaikou Plantation to sell them, and they come into the cry of the turkey [palahu].¹

¹Whereas the cry of the nene, “unele, unele,” is associated with lacking, the cry of the turkey, “pokeokeo,” is associated with riches.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 10/26/1878, p. 1)

Na wahine lawaia.

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke I, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 26, 1878.

Description of the Nene by Kepelino, 1863.

THE STORY

—OF—

The Birds of Hawaii nei

NUMBER 5.

Nene Bird.

The Nene is a bird from the high uplands, and it is a big bird; it resembles a Turkey [Pelehu] and it is that height, its legs are long, and its toes are flat, its neck is nicely slim, its head is small, its eyes are like the eyes of a Chicken [Moa], its beak is short, it has a fine loud voice, and its call sounds like, “unele, unele, unele.”

It is said in the old Hawaiian stories, that the Nene and the Fly [Nalo] were deprived of their wealth, and that is why the Nene cries in that manner, “unele, unele” [“without, without”] and the Nalo chose its place to live as Kapalapilau [“Rotting dab of excreta”], and that is still what they do.

The Nene does not eat Rats [Iole] and other things like the Hawk [Io], and the Owl [Pueo], it only eats leaves of vegetation and flowers of grasses. Continue reading

Nene being cared for by Herbert Shipman, etc. 1941.

[Found under: “Hunahuna Meahou o Hamakua Ame Kohala” by Mrs. Reinhardt.]

Last week, two men living and working at the Kilauea National Park came to Honokaa School, their names being Gunther Olsen and friend. The school was filled with its 496 students from 1st grade to 6th, to see pictures of the mountains of this island. Olsen described the different birds while his companion showed pictures of the birds on a white cloth. Truly beautiful were the pictures of the mamo, O-o, Elepaio, Iiwi, Apapane, and so forth. The names of the birds of ours were clearly pronounced in Hawaii by that man.

According what was said by this man, in Keaau is being cared for at the home of Herbert Shipman, NENE birds, which are believed to be going extinct, but they are increasing. Our birds were much more beautiful in the olden days before other birds were imported from all over, the birds that are a problem for the crops growing in our gardens. They eat flowers of the peppers [nioi], and that is why the nioi doesn’t fruit as they did in years past.

After the pictures of the birds were shown, pictures were shown of the burning fires of Pele atop Mokuaweoweo last year. These men climbed up Mokuaweoweo on horseback and when they reached a certain point, the horses were left and they went on foot until the crater. Where they were was scorching. While the fires were boiling, snow was seen on both sides covering the ground. Continue reading

David Kanealii and his new wife visits the home of his parents, 1918.

SEEING THE BELOVED HOME OF MY PARENTS.

O Editor of the Nupepa Kuokoa:—Please have patience for my package that I put before you, and place it upon one of the open decks of our newspaper, which will send it out so those from Hawaii Island will see it and those of Lehua Island will hear it.

On the 14th, Mrs. Napewai [? Naopuwai] Kanealii and her husband D. Kanealii left this town and went to Kauai, and in the morning of the 15th, we landed in Nawiliwili, were taken by the tossing of the machine to Wainiha and were lovingly welcomed in the home of Joseph Kanealii. Continue reading