Commission carrying the anti-annexation petitions, 1897.

THE APPEARANCES OF THE REPRESENTATIVES ARE FINE.

We have just seen in the newspaper the “Call” of San Francisco, portraits of the Representatives of the Lahui which were published in that newspaper, with appreciation and delight. Looking closely at all four of their portraits, they each appear fine and dignified, as if those are truly them from top to bottom; there is nothing for the eye to criticize. Also, that newspaper reports of their safe arrival, as well as a conversation of some of the Representatives with a reporter of the newspaper about annexation.

On their sides are portraits of Senators R. F. Pettigrew and Dubois, and both of their stories, from their arrival in Honolulu on the way to Japan, all the way to their return to America. Both of them are true friends to the Hawaiian, wherever they went and came in contact with our native people, but it will be the Senate that will confirm the truth of the words they planted in the hearts of the true Hawaiian people; we hope that the true outcome of their efforts for the good of the land, the people, and the Monarchy arises, and may God in His endless patience bolster their endeavors and progress, so that the journey of our Representatives is helped along. Let Hawaii live forever.

[See the issue of the San Francisco Call (11/28/1897, pp. 1 & 2) referred to in this article here.]

(Aloha Aina, 12/11/1897, p. 2)

ULUMAHIEHIE NA HELEHELENA O NA ELELE.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 11, 1897.

Anti-Annexation Petitions, 1897.

TO THE PEOPLE.

The people who have yet to sign their names on the documents of the Signature Committee are requested to please go and sign their names at the Office of the President, James K. Kaulia, atop the stone building at the corner of Nuuanu and Queen Streets, everyday except Sundays.

Enoch Johnson,

Secretary of the Hawaiian Patriotic League.

(Aloha Aina, 11/6/1897, p. 5)

I KA LEHULEHU.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 45, Aoao 5. Novemaba 6, 1897.

Excerpts of “Strangling Hands…” appearing in the Hawaiian-Language Newspaper. 1897.

NA LIMA KAKAUHA MALUNA O KA PUA-I O KEKAHI LAHUI.

[This article is taken from the famed “Strangling Hands upon a Nation’s Throat” article by Miriam Michelson, which appears in the San Francisco Call, 9/30/1897, pp. 1–3. The introductory paragraphs go:]

For the benefit of our readers, we are taking some ideas printed in the newspaper San Francisco Call, written by the pen of Miss Miriam Michelson, on the deck of the ship, Australia, on the 22nd of September.

Remember that this woman newspaper reporter was the woman reporter present at the meeting of the Patriotic League of Hilo held at the meeting house of the Salvation Army in Hilo Town, and this is what she reported: . . .

(Aloha Aina, 10/16/1897, pp. 6 & 7.)

NA LIMA KAKAUHA MALUNA O KA PUA-I O KEKAHI LAHUI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 42, Aoao 6. Okatoba 16, 1897.

Mai ka aoao eono mai.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 42, Aoao 7. Okatoba 16, 1897.

Strangling Hands upon a Nation’s Throat. 1897.

STRANGLING HANDS UPON A NATION’S THROAT.

[This is the famous article by Miriam Michelson who went to Hilo and wrote of an anti-annexation petition drive held there.]

(San Francisco Call, 9/30/1897, pp. 1–3.)

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-1/

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-2/

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-3/

More on the lowering of the flag, 1898.

WHO HATH EARS TO HEAR, LET HIM HEAR.*

Being that in time that news reported of earlier will come, about the raising of the American Flag above Hawaii, from the authority of the Republic of America; and in regard to this, word is being sent out to my beloved nation of Patriots.

DECLARATION TO THE LAHUI.

To all Patriots, we pray [ke Ka o ia aku nei? ke Kalo ia aku nei?] that you will not visit nor approach the area where the American Flag will be raised; let everyone remain at their own Home, kneel and look to the almighty one to ask for his help for the Hawaiian Nation, Land, and Kingdom.

All heads and leaders of the men’s and women’s Ahahui Aloha Aina [Hawaiian Patriotic League] and Hui Kalaiaina [Hawaiian Political Association], are directed to heed this as well.

JAMES K. KAULIA.

President.

*Mataio (Matthew) 13:9.

(Aloha Aina, 8/6/1898, p. 4)

O KA MEA PEPEIAO LOHE E HOOLOHE IA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 32, Aoao 4. Augate 6, 1898.

More on Hawaiians and the lowering of the flag, 1898.

WHO LOWERS THE FLAG?

Apparent Difference of Opinion Among Native Hawaiians.

Consultations Being Held—Preparations for Presenting Views Before the Commissioners.

The proposed Hawaiian political society spoken of in the Bulletin a few days ago has not yet completed all arrangements for organization but in a few days some definite action may be looked for.

The men at the head of the movement look upon it as most vital that a committee of representative Hawaiians be appointed to present the views of the Hawaiian people before the Commission that is soon to investigate matters in Hawaii preparatory to the framing of laws for her government.

Messrs. Ka-ne and Poepoe, two of the leaders in the movement referred to above, are at present consulting with various prominent Hawaiians on the matter of the lowering of the Hawaiian flag. They have agreed that it would be the correct thing to have a native born Hawaiian lower the flag for the last time, and they name Prince Albert Kunuiakea as the one, who should be selected to do this. Should he not consent, Judge Kalua is named as second choice. At any rate, the Government will be consulted in regard to the matter.

On the other hand there are natives who think that such a proceeding would be distinctly inappropriate and not at all in accordance with the feelings of the mass of native Hawaiians who would refuse point blank to take any part whatsoever in the lowering of the Hawaiian flag or raising of the American.

[This is one of the articles in the English newspapers of the day, on the subject of having a Hawaiian be the one to lower the flag.]

(Evening Bulletin, 8/5/1898, p. 1)

WHO LOWERS THE FLAG?

Evening Bulletin, Volume V, Number 982, Page 1. August 5, 1898.

Hawaiians and the lowering of the flag, 1898.

WILL THE ONE WHO LOWERS THE FLAG BE A HAWAIIAN?

There is much talk going around these days about this disturbing subject, that some native Hawaiians are being asked to carry out this deed when the time comes, that being the 12th of this month.

The kanaka Hawaii maoli who agrees to do this vile act, betraying the Beloved Flag of his homeland, should think carefully, and set his eyes upon the Beautiful Hawaiian Flag as the wafts of breeze softly unfurls the Hawaiian Flag upon its throne, that being top of the flag pole, before he rushes to carry out the traitorous orders of the cowards who are full of evil.

Let us leave to the American haole and the American descendants the carrying out of this act, so that the consequences fall on the haole and not on the Hawaiians.

Remember this: “It is not upon the chief priests of the Jews of those days past that befell the bitter end for their pushing Judas Iscariot to betray the Lord Jesus. But the horrible end fell upon Judas for that deed of the chief priests, and not upon them. It was Judas’ bowels that gushed out, and not that of the people who urged him on.

This will be the same, O Beloved Hawaiian people, and the haole is taking by force from you Beloved Hawaii.

Leave it to the haole to take down the Beloved Flag of Hawaii.

Edward Kekoa.

(Aloha Aina, 8/13/1893, p. 2)

HE KANAKA HAWAII ANA ANEI KA MEA NANA E HUKI KA HAE HAWAII ILALO

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 33, Aoao 2. Augate 13, 1898.

Two more days of performances left for Mai Poina: The Annexation Debate.

Hawai‘i Pono‘ī Coalition Presents:

MAI POINA: The Annexation Debate

In 1898, Hawai‘i was annexed by the United States in a most unorthodox and deeply controversial manner.

Citizens of both nations debated the issue then as well as today. Join us for an enlivening debate, ripped from the pages of Hawai‘i’s recent past.

February 23, 24, 25, & 26

All performances begin at 7 p.m., except for a 2 p.m. matinee on February 26.

Admission is free, though seating is limited in the Judiciary History Center courtroom in historic Ali‘iōlani Hale – directly ma kai of ‘Iolani Palace.

FOR RESERVATIONS, CALL 534-8880

Co-sponsored by the Center for Biographical Research and the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, as well as the Judiciary History Center.

More on pictures from the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers and why they need to be reshot. 2012.

[After looking at that Kapiolani Park horse racing picture, you might be thinking, “Seen one horse race, seen them all…” But what about this!

This here is perhaps the only image* known of Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe (patriot/historian/statesman/newspaper editor/lawyer/translator/storyteller…). It comes from his obituary printed in the newspaper Kuokoa.

This is the image you will see from the newspaper online:

KA HON J. M. POEPOE

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 15, Aoao 1. Aperila 18, 1913.

Here is a photograph taken by that same amateur from the original newspaper. It isn’t the best of pictures, but at least you get an idea…]

KA HON. J. M. POEPOE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 15, Aoao 1. Aperila 18, 1913.

*There is one other image I found, but Poepoe is standing far in the back, and is hardly visible. It was taken at the opening of the Legislature (just a few months before he dies). Poepoe stands in the top row, 4th from the left. (This is the image you will find online.)

Weheia Ke Kau Ehiku o Ka Ahaolelo Kuloko o Ke Teritore o Hawaii Nei

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke L, Helu 8, Aoao 1. Feberuari 21, 1913.

Just another reason why the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers need to be reshot. 2012.

[Here is what the typical picture looks like from a Hawaiian-Language Newspaper when you see it online. This particular image is of the horse races at Kapiolani Park in 1913.]

Ikeia Na Heihei Like Ole Mawaho o Kapiolani Paka

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 1, Aoao 1. Ianuari 3, 1913.

[However, that image taken by a total amateur with an average camera shot directly from the newspaper looks like this.]

Ikeia Na Heihei Like Ole Mawaho o Kapiolani Paka

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 1, Aoao 1. Ianuari 3, 1913.