Queen Emma sends condolences to Mataio Kekuanaoa, 1866.

News of the Royal Court

Through the kindness of His Highness Mataio Kekuanaoa, we put before our readers these loving words of our Queen Emma.

Upper Gore Lodge, England
Kensington, July 23, 1866.

My Father; Much Aloha:

During these dark days of distress of ours and the nation, I have much aloha for you and the One who left us. Alas for my sister-in-law [kaikoeke], my companion of the land from when we were children. The sun and the rain are companions, joined together by us are the sea spray and the rains steady on the barren fields and the forests; your leader of the islands. How sad; aloha for that lei of ours, my child, and aloha for my dear husband. Alas for you all! My heart is troubled as I am separated alone in a foreign land. It is as if this trip to introduce the Archipelago to the Great Nations of the World is a waste of time. But be patient, O Father, don’t give up, and leave us. For there is one who remains from your loins. Be patient.

With a heavy heart,

Your child,

(Signed) Kaleleonalani.

[There were so many deaths amongst the alii during these years, Ka Haku o Hawaii and Kamehameha IV, and now, Victoria Kamamalu. Not long after, her hanai mother, Grace Kamaikui Young Rooke would pass on. These were indeed dark days for Queen Emma.]

(Kuokoa, 10/6/1866, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 40, Aoao 2. Okatoba 6, 1866.

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Queen Emma in New York, 1866.

THE DISTINGUISHED VISITOR.

Emma, the Queen Dowager of the Sandwich Islands, Visits Brooklyn, the Navy Yard, and Sails Down the Bay—Callers at Her Hotel Yesterday, &c.

Her Majesty of the Sandwich Islands, Emma, is determined, it would appear, to see the lions of the famed city of New York while she has the opportunity, and yesterday she extended the pardonable curiosity, which it is not scandalum magnatum to say her Majesty shares with the rest of her sex, to the sister city of Brooklyn. At half-past nine in the morning Queen Emma left her hotel, accompanied by Miss Grinnell, Miss Spurgeon, Major Hopkins, and lady-in-waiting, and drove down Broadway, to the Fulton ferry, whence Her Majesty and suite crossed to Brooklyn. The first place visited was Greenwood cemetery, with the beautiful scenery around which the party was much delighted. On the way back, they stopped at the photographic gallery in Fulton street, where the Queen sat for her portrait.

VISIT TO THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD.

Pursuant to the announcement made in yesterday’s Herald the entire party then paid a visit to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The hour appointed for her arrival was half-past one o’clock, and for one hour an assemblage of the citizens of Brooklyn and elsewhere commenced collecting until the mass numbered upwards of three thousand persons. The gates of the yard were closed to all persons except those who had passes signed by the chief officers. Half-past one arrived, but no tidings were received of the Queen. The crowd commenced to get impatient, jokes were passed to and fro to the parties on both sides of the street, when at length, at twenty minutes to two, two open carriages appeared in sight, containing the Queen, suite and attendants. It was observed as the carriages entered the yard that the first one contained her Majesty, Miss Spurgen, maid of honor; Mr. and Miss Odell; and the second Major C. Gordon Hopkins, of the Hawaiian army, and Miss Grinnell, maid of honor. As the party entered the gates the marine guard were formed in line and received her Majesty at “present arms.” She returned the compliment with a polite bow, the carriages proceeding to Admiral Bell’s quarters, in the Lyceum building. Arriving at this point the honored guest was received and assisted from her carriage by Captain Alexander M. Pennock, chief executive officer of the Navy Yard, who in turn introduced her to Rear Admiral Charles H. Bell, the commandant. The Admiral tendered his arm to the Queen, who promptly accepted it, and the party proceeded to the portico on the second story of the Lyceum. When Queen Emma alighted, the Marine battalion, commanded by Captain Collier, were drawn up in line, presented arms, while the Navy Yard band played the air of “Hail Columbia.” A detachment of the crew of the United States ship Vermont fired a salute of twenty-one guns from the Cob deck battery, and the Hawaiian flag was displayed at the main topgallant masthead. Continue reading

Queen Emma travelling abroad a hundred and fifty years ago, 1866.

Queen Emma.

From what we heard last of our beloved Queen, she is staying at Hyeres in the south of France. We are happy to say that she is in very good health, and so too her entourage. In accordance with the kind invitation by His Highness, the Minister of the Navy [??? Kuhina o na moku], she went to tour the areas where the weapons are stored and the port of Toulon, and she was welcomed hospitably and treated with all honors appropriate to her position. A great feast was given in the evening of the day she went there. Continue reading

A Hawaiian Co-Op, 1918.

KA “HUI LOKAHI O NA HAWAII” KAUPALENAIA.

These passing day, Hawaiians like Mayor Joseph J. Fern, David Kalauokalani, Samuel C. Dwight, James L. Holt, Hon. William P. Jarrett, Hon. C. P. Iaukea and a number of other Hawaiians are joining together to establish a company that will deal in the sale of poi, beef, salmon, dried fish, and so forth; with the intent to help Hawaiians in all ways that will lessen their household expenses; because it is very clear these days that because the poi factory of Kalihi is not making poi now, the current poi manufacturers are greatly raising the price of poi to five cents per pound; this is a price not seen in the past ten years or more; so too with the price of beef; the Chinese are buying very fine beef from the company of C. J. Waller [Wala], but the Chinese are charging Hawaiians 35 cents per p0und; it is an exorbitant price which has never been seen before; and it is heard from the talk of the Chinese that they will raise the price of poi once again to 6 cents a pound; it was this that encouraged the Hawaiians to establish a company that could hold back the severe increasing of the prices of our foods, O Hawaiians, by the Chinese.

The establishing of a company amongst Hawaiians is important and crucial; but if we Hawaiians do not implement an endeavor that will help ourselves, there will  be no one else who will help us.

If we turn back and look at the history of Hawaii nei, we will see that the dissension amongst us Hawaiians was what wrenched away small businesses from us Hawaiians as well as all the other endeavors. Continue reading

Hasn’t the time come that Hawaiians try to help in the economic endeavors of their own people? 1914.

Announcement

KA HUI KUAI POI O KALIHI (“KALIHI TARO AND LAND CO., LTD.”)

To those who read this.

With aloha:—Whereas all of the shares of the Company named above has been acquired by W. C. Achi and some Hawaiians, and being that they are the only Hawaiians carrying out the growing of taro and the selling of poi, the food of our kupuna and makua; therefore, they humbly ask you, O Hawaiians, that you give them your assistance, by you buying your poi from their group.

The production of the poi at their poi factory is truly sanitary, and your orders will be filled with great haste.

Hasn’t the time come that Hawaiians try to help in the economic endeavors of their own people? Continue reading

Kalihi Poi Factory advertisement, 1916.

TASTY POI!

Orders for poi from all over the Territory will be filled. The cost is reasonable and the production is hygienic. Isn’t it right that Hawaiians should assist in the efforts of Hawaiians?

Send in your Orders.

KALIHI POI FACTORY

Telephone Number 1586

HONOLULU, T. H.  11-2716

(Aloha Aina, 4/15/1916, p. 4)

AlohaAina_4_15_1916_4

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXI, Helu 27, Aoao 4. Aperila 15, 1916.

Uluniu, land of the former home of King Kalakaua, sold, 1915.

A PORTION OF THE HOUSE LOT OF KUHIO WAS SOLD.

That section of the land known as Uluniu which faces Kalakaua Avenue stretching from Ainahau to the area very close to the residence of Representative Kuhio, went to the new owner, Percy M. Pond, through a sale on the morning of this past Friday.

The land is almost six acres, and includes a majority of the house lot in Waikiki previously owned by Prince Kuhio. According to what is being said in public, it went for the price of $32,500. Continue reading