Kaleleonalani, 44 years old, 1880.

The Birthday of Emma Lani.—This Friday (yesterday) the 2nd of January 1880, Queen Emma Kaleleonalani made a full 44 years old. Just as usual, the day her royal mother suffered the pangs of birth arrived. The walls of her estate were filled with people. We are very happy to announce to the public that the cherished lehua blossom is as always bright upon her attractive full cheeks and the body of that “Rare Blossom” of the lahui remains strong. And while the people joyfully celebrate the arrival of that fine day, we remember and join in the cheer, and give our prayer that she lives long with her family with ease and good fortune. The King was graceful in passing by to give his congratulations to the Queen of one of the famed Kings of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 1/3/1880, p. 2)

Ka La Hanau o Emma Lani.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIX, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Ianuari 3, 1880.

Hanaiakamalama rules, 1916.

RULES REGARDING HOME OF QUEEN EMMA PASSED BY HAWAII DAUGHTERS

Rules and regulations bearing on Hanaiakamalama, the Nuuanu home of the late Queen Emma, were adopted at a meeting on Wednesday of the Daughters of Hawaii, which society now has charge of the home. The rules are as follows:

“1. The object of Hanaiakamalama is to preserve articles formerly owned by the late Queen Emma and such other articles of historic interest as may be give the Daughters of Hawaii for safe keeping.

“2. The building shall be open to visitors daily from 9 to 12 in the morning and from 2 to 4 in the afternoon, excepting Sunday and other days that may be designated.

“3. The house can only be used as a meeting place for the Daughters of Hawaii and cannot be engaged for any other purpose.

“4. A fee of 25 cents will be charged all visitors, members excepted.

“5. Visitors are requested not to handle or deface any article in the building.”

(Star-Bulletin, 10/19/1916, p. 3)

RULES REGARDING HOME OF QUEEN EMMA PASSED BY HAWAII DAUGHTERS

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXIV, Number 7651, Page 3. October 19, 1916.

Samuel K. Kekoowai on the Daughters of Hawaii and Hanaiakamalama, 1923.

HANAIAKAMALAMA

This is a building near the end of the route of the electric car, and it stands on a hill.

As a result of the graciousness of one of the members of the Daughters of Hawaii [Ahahui o na Kaikamahine o Hawaii], this writer [Samuel K. Kekoowai] was introduced to Mrs. J. Swanzy, the leader of this association, and by her kindness I was welcomed to see the walls of that house which is filled with beautiful decorations of the monarchy, and their images hanging from the walls, set up almost like the museum of Kamehameha [Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum].

This group, the Daughters of Hawaii, upholds the name of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani, and her birthday is cherished by them, and the writer observed the commemoration held by the association which holds dear the name placed upon them, the Daughters of Hawaii.

In the story told to me within the house, Kaleleonalani was raised by her hanai guardian [kahu hanai], Dr. Rooke [Kauka Luka], until she married Liholiho Kamehameha 4, however, there is another version that I have been told by another.

On that 20th day of this June, I saw the back room totally filled with those who came, from the members to visitors, and most were whites and there were a few Hawaiians [??? a o-a na Hawaii].

The story of the circuit of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani around Oahu nei was told, beginning at Waimanalo at the place of John Cummins [Keoni Kamaki], and to Kaneohe at the place of Wainui Pii, and then on to Waikane at the place of Kameaaloha; at Kahana there was a Chinese named Apakana, on to Punaluu there was Naili, to Laie at the place of Kupau, to Kahuku at the place of Kaluhi, to Waialua at the place of Kaiaikawaha. Continue reading

Death of Kekelaokalani, 1880.

FUNERAL.

A service will be held over the remains of Kekelaokalani, Kekuaipoiwa [Kekuiapoiwa], Kailikulani, Leleoili, Kulua, on the following Sunday, October 3, between the hours of 1 and 3 in the afternoon, at the pleasant home, Rooke House [Luka Hale], the place where they made warm with their daughter, the Royal One, Emma Kaleleonalani.

Aloha wa—le,
Ke haha hewa nei o’u mau lima,
I ke kino wailua o kuu mama,
Ua ha—la,
Ua hala ma kela aoao o ka pouli,
Aohe e loaa aku ia’u ke hahai,
Eia au la ua huihui i ke anu,
Anu maeele i kuu kino,
Owau wale no nei e u ae nei,
Aloha—Aloha ino.

[Much Aloha,
My hands search in vain,
Over the body of my dear mama,
She has gone,
She has gone to the other side of the darkness,
I shall not catch her should I follow after her,
Here I am chilled in the cold,
My body is numbed,
It is I alone who mourns,
Aloha—How woeful.]

(Elele Poakolu, 9/29/1880, p. 1)

HOOLEWA.

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke I, Helu 4, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 29, 1880.

Just because something appears in a newspaper doesn’t necessarily make it true, 1865.

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

News from a Far Country.—The following item is clipped from the Weekly London Times:

An Irish Queen in the Sandwich Islands.—The fact that Queen Emma of the Sandwich Islands is expected in Europe gives interest to the following details:—The Sandwich Islands were thus named in 1778, by Captain Cook, in honor of Lord Sandwich, then First Lord of the Admirality. The inhabitants are of the Polynesian race, and were long governed by a number of native chiefs perpetually at war with each other. In 1784 one of them, Kamehameha I., subjected all the islands to his authority, established a monarchy, took up his residence in the town of Honolulu, in the island of Oahu, and reigned until his death in 1819. His dynasty is still on the throne. The present King, Kamehameha V., aged thirty-five, succeeded his brother, who had left no children, in 1863. He has reformed the constitution of the State, favoured trade, manufactures, and the settlement of foreigners, and has acquired the love of his people. The Minister of Finance, M. Crosnier de Varigny, is a Frenchman; the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Wilkie, was born in Scotland; and the Minister of Interior, Mr. Hopkins, is a native of London; the Minister of Justice and the Chancellor, Mr. Harris and Mr. Allen, are both citizens of the United States. This Cabinet is much esteemed by the Chambers. Queen Emma is a native of Ireland, and is aged twenty-nine. She married in 1856 Kamehameha IV., the late King, but lost her only son in 1862, and her husband in the following year. Queen Victoria has placed a ship of war at her disposal for her voyages to Europe, where she intends to visit successively England, France and Germany.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 9/30/1865, p. 2)

News from a Far Country...

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume X, Number 13, Page 2. September 30, 1865.

Queen Emma baptized, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

The Queen Baptized.—On Tuesday, the 21st of this month, the Queen was baptized at the Palace [Hale Alii]. Bishop Rev. T. N. Staley performed the baptism in the fashion of the Anglican faith, and the name of the Queen that she was baptized with is Alexadrina Francis Agnes Lowder Byde Rooke Young Kaleleokalani. Present were all the alii and the friends of the royal court of Hawaii nei. There as well was the Commissioner of Great Britain and his Wife as well.

(Kuokoa, 10/25/1862, p. 2)

Bapetizoia ka Moi Wahine.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Okatoba 25, 1862.

Lucy Kaheiheimalie Peabody Henriques has gone on, 1928.

MUCH ALOHA FOR THAT ALII WHO WAS FULL OF ALOHA

That chiefess born of the land, Mrs. Lucy Kaheiheimalie Peabody Henriques has gone. She was loved by all of us, and she was a precious one among the people. She was going silently away these past weeks. Aloha with unending tears. She went to see the sacred bosom of Kane. The rejected flowers were strewn at Wailua [?? Ua ahu iho la na pua wahawaha i Wailua]; she left grieving behind, her beloved lei, her daughter, Kalanikiekie Henriques. Continue reading