James Pauahi Alohikea and the alalaua, 1917.

J. P. ALOHIKEA MEETS HIS DEATH

In common with a good many other Hawaiians, J. P. Alohikea, the well known harness maker and upholsterer of Lihue, went down to the shore Thursday evening to fish for ala-lau’a.

An experienced fisherman he went to that point on the rocky coast between the outer and inner lighthouse known as Pukaulua, a famous fishing hole, and was sitting there on the edge of the same when an unusually large swell rolled in and swept him off the narrow ledge of rock and into the boiling cauldron.

Thence the receeding surge carried him into the open sea. In the process he was doubtless more or less bruised and mangled so that he was unable to help himself effectively. William Hookano, who was near by, heard his call and tried to reach him with a long fishing rod, but in the fierce surge the bamboo was broken to fragments, and Hookano was warned of the futility of throwing himself into the sea to save his friend.

In the darkness and roar of the surge the unfortunate man was soon lost.

(Garden Island, 9/11/1917, p. 1)

J. P. ALOHIKEA MEETS HIS DEATH

The Garden Island, Volume 13, Number 37, Page 1. September 11, 1917.

More on the alalaua, 1917.

THE RED FISH INVASION

The ancient superstition that visits of red fish in large numbers to the Islands portend the death of some member of the royal family, absurd as it may be, has just had what may be considered by many a remarkable substantiation. A few months ago there started running into and around the harbors of the Islands such schools of alalaua as had not been seen before in five years or more, if not in many years prior to that; and the schools of aweoweo, or grown alalaua, are still here. When the little red fish first started coming in months ago, the older natives shook their heads and declared that one of their aliis must go. It has so turned out. Of course the supposition that there is, or can be, any connection between the two circumstances is ridiculous, but the singular thing to anybody is that the two incidents should have happened together so many times in history, as to create a more or less fixed superstition.

(Maui News, 11/16/1917, p. 4)

THE RED FISH INVASION

The Maui News, Eighteenth Year, Number 923, Page 4. November 16, 1917.

The Queen and the alalaua, 1917.

QUEEN LILIUOKALANI.

Following the birthdays of our dearly Beloved Queen, her weakening health was noticed. And we guess that this is the reason for the appearance of the alalaua, like what is usual for this lahui, that when this fish to save the people runs, the Ruler will follow. Aloha for the Chiefs of this Lahui; left is Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole, our Chiefly Representative and the Leader of this People.

(Puuhonua, 9/28/1917, p. 4)

KA MOIWAHINE LILIUOKALANI.

Ka Puuhonua, Buke IV, Helu 39, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 28, 1917.

Big run of alalaua, 1917.

THE ALALAUA¹ FISH IS A LIFE SAVER THESE DAYS.

All sorts of people are heading together these days to go pole fishing for alalaua: the piers are full of men, women, and children.

A few days ago is when the run of alalaua began by the piers near the prison of Kawa all the way until those by the mouth of the harbor. Even the haole went alalaua fishing at night, probably just for fun; however, for some, it is a true lifesaver, with the high cost of fish, where they can escape from buying fish [??]. If the alalaua keeps running in Honolulu Harbor, it is clear that the other desired fishes will be in trouble. God is the one who is controlling this, the prodding of this fish into the harbor; it is to alleviate the troubles of the people from the vise of the fish mongers.

All those going pole fishing should give their thanks to the Heavens for this great assistance, and we believe that the Heavenly Father will increase all kinds of fish more than this.

¹Alalaua (also seen as Alalauwa) is the juvenile stage of the Aweoweo.

(Aloha Aina, 9/14/1917, p. 4)

HE HOOLA KA I'A ALALAUA I KEIA MAU LA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 37, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 14, 1917.

Mahalo to Elinor Langer for her comment on trial of participants of the January 6, 1895 Counter Revolution. 1895.

Elinor Langer says:

And it was on January 17, 1895, the second anniversary, that the Republic opened the trials of the people arrested for “treason” in the revolt. Has anyone seen accounts in the Hawaiian papers about what happened on January 24, the day the Queen signed her forced abdication statement? According to “The Friend” (February 1, 1895) “On the 24th, while engaged in the trial of a company of natives, the Court was startled by the fall upon the table around which they sat of a massive bar of plaster from the lofty ceiling [of the Throne Room, where the trials were taking place.] The bar was nine feet long, forming part of a decorative panel. It fell upon the center of the table, precisely fitting the length of it. Col. Whiting had a narrow escape, his face being grazed, although protected by his military hat. The plaster had been loosened by a sharp shake of earthquake the night before.” The Queen signed the statement at 11 a.m. in the rooms directly above –perhaps even at the same time?

[See the original article, “The Story of the Insurrection” in The Friend, Volume 53, Number 2, Pages 9–11. February 1895.

Comment to Writing on the wall, 1894.]

A New Year’s Gift: a Genealogy of Rulers, 1874.

A NEW YEAR’S GIFT.

The Kuokoa, on this first issue of its proud days of 1874, wants to gift this Genealogical List of the Rulers over the Hawaian people, starting from Kahiko Luamea, from the pen of S. M. Kamakau. It was upon Oahu that the ancient ones first lived, and the genealogy from before this is not from here in Hawaii, but it is said that they were from the sky [lewa]. The first people in this genealogy, it is widely stated that they are from the Islands of the South Pacific, New Zealand, and the islands to the Western North Pacific. And the listing of Alii Genealogy below just pertains to those who were Aliiaimoku. From Kahiko Luamea to Kapawa, they just ruled on Oahu. From Kapawa to Palena, most of the Alii were on Oahu and Maui; one was from Kauai, Luanuu; and two on Hawaii, Wahieloa and Pohukaina; and from Palena is where Hawaii’s royal Ancestry from Maui come from. And from Palena was born Hana, thereafter Maui’s and Hawaii’s chiefly line have been born until this time. It began from Abraham, being that the laws were the same, the genealogy was the same, and the circumcision was the same. Here are the alii listed out:

Kahiko Luamea,
Awakea [Wakea],
Haloa,
Waia,
Hinanalo,
Nanakahili,
Wailoa,
Kio,
Ole,
Pupue,
Manaku,
Lukahakoa,
Kahiko,
Luanuu,
Kii,
Ulu,
Nana,
Nanaia,
Nanaialani,
Waikulani,
Kuheleimoana,
Konohiki,
Wawana,
Akalana,
Mauiakalana,
Nanamaoa,
Nanakulai,
Nanakaoko,
Kapawa,
Heleipawa,
Hulumanailani,
Aikanaka,
Hema,
Kahai,
Wahieloa,
Laka,
Luanuu,
Kamea,
Pohukaina,
Hua,
Pau,
Paumakua,
Huanuiikalailai,
Haho,
Palena,
Hana,
Lanakawai,
Laau,
Pili,
Koa,
Loe,
Kukahoulani,
Kaniuhu,
(Kanipahu Kalapana)
Kahaimoeleaikaaikapukupou,
Kalaunuiohua,
Kuaiwa,
Kahoukapu,
Kauhola,
Kiha,
Liloa,
Hakau,
Umi,
Keliiokala,
Keawenuiaumi,
Kanaloakuaana,
Umiokalani,
Lonoikamakahiki,
Iwikauikaua,
Keakakamahana (w [wahine])
Keakealani (w),
Keaweikekahialiiokamoku,
(Kalaninuiiamamao Keeaumoku),
Alapai a Kauaua,
Keaweopala,
Kaleiopuu,
Kiwalao,
Kamehameha I.
Liholiho (Kamehameha II),
Kauikeaouli (Kamehameha III),
Liholiho II (Kamehameha IV),
Kapuaiwa (Kamehameha V),
Lunalilo.

[This seems to be a little different from what is seen in the appendix of Kamakau’s “Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii”.]

(Kuokoa, 1/3/1874, p. 2)

HE MAKANA MAKAHIKI HOU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Ianuari 3, 1874.

Vital Statistics, 1913.

MARRIAGES.

J. H. Akana to Mrs. Eliza K. King, January 3.
William K. M. Makanui to Hattie K. Manoha, January 4.
William Ayau to Miss Annie Fernandez, January 9.
Daniel Aona to Mrs. Maria Kapehe Hugo, January 9.

BIRTHS.

To Moses Ehu and Rose Kaeo, a daughter, January 5.
To Rodrigo Villafor and Mary Lui, a daughter, January 7.
To William P. Dole and Emily Kekoa, a daughter, January 8.

DEATHS.

Iokewe Niauhoe, on Kunawai Lane, January 15.

(Kuokoa, 1/17/1913, p. 8)

NA MARE. / NA HANAU. / NA MAKE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 3, Aoao 8. Ianuari 17, 1913.

Mistreatment of leprosy patients and why we need to reshoot the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, 1886.

ABUSE BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH.

O Kuokoa, Aloha Oe:—

Please be so patient as to show this improper behavior to clarify the above, thus: This past week the steamship Makalii arrived here in Kalapapa with five leprosy patients for this colony. These five people told me (the Writer) about the cruelty done by the Board of Health, and this is the story told by them.

On the 21st of the past month, at 4 in the afternoon, stepped onto the deck of the ship and left Honolulu, and they were placed at the bow of the ship. They were in distress while at sea due to the winds that were blowing strongly and they were covered by the sea and shivered in the cold. They were not give food for two days and then landed here in Kalaupapa. They were in desperate shape, and were treated like animals being placed at the bow. The Board of Health did not look after their well-being even if they ?????

These days, the leprosy patients of Kalawao are made to work ?????? mistreated by the Board of Health. They don’t consider the weak state of the people and are worked like slaves and they are prisoners of the law.

Here, I ????? with sincerity.

J. J. Kawehena.

[I know i keep saying that the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers need to be reshot again so that we can have the clearest images possible, but i can’t help it. Here is a perfect example. I am guessing at a good deal of the content, and where i couldn’t, i left as “????” Once the papers deteriorate and crumble away, there is no way we can get these histories.]

(Kuokoa, 7/3/1886, p. 1)

KA HANA HOOMAINOINO A KA PAPA OLA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXV, Helu 27, Aoao 1. Iulai 3, 1886.

Writing on the wall, 1894.

The Day of Happiness is a Day of Sadness.

On this day, those who took our beloved land by force rejoice, and it makes a full years since they’ve feasted wastefully of the fertile soil of our mother land. This day is one of happiness for the circle of missionaries, plunderers of land, and overthrowers of the Hawaiian Kingdom, as well as for those who enter join their circle.

It is true, they will indeed rejoice; however, along with this joy, there is hurt within. Look at Belshazzar [Belehazara] the one whose boast went, “Am I not Belshazzar, the builder of the Great Babylon? Look at its shiny walls, its beautiful images, and its Throne has authority and might.”

However, let us recall, O Hawaiian Lahui, his story; what is known? it is this: That night, everyone was joyous, and drinking wine from cups sacred to Jehovah, Almighty God; and they praised Belshazzar for his great beauty. However, while the rejoicing was going on, there was seen part of a hand writing some words on the wall of the house—Mene, Mene, Setela, Uparesina; You have been weighed on the scales and have been found wanting. It was these astonishing words which caused a fear to fall over everyone in the house; and as for the king Beshazzar, he was shaking with trepidation at this amazing portion of a hand.

And that is what we are saying: the day of joy of the Government of the P. G. [Provisional Government], is the day that sadness will come; for we have seen their actions done over the past year. They were not actions done to move this land forward, but actions that were clearly harmful as well as squandering. Therefore O Pious Ones, do not forget to remember Jehovah, God, and he shall help us.

Puuwaialoha [“Loving-heart”]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/17/1894, p. 2)

Ka La o ka Hauoli oia no ka La o ka Luuluu.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 856, Aoao 2. Ianuari 17, 1894.

More on the Boston, in English, 1893.

The U. S. S. Boston Lands Sailors and Marines.

(From Daily, January 17.)

Yesterday was an eventful day in this city. At early morning groups of men could be seen about the streets talking over the present critical situation.

About eleven o’clock the following notice was handed about but it was not received with favor as it was considered but a ruse on the part of the revolutionists:

BY AUTHORITY.

Her Majesty’s Ministers desire to express their appreciation for the quiet and order which has prevailed in this community since the events of Saturday, and are authorized to say that the position taken by Her Majesty in regard to the promulgation of a new Constitution, was under stress of Her native subjects.

Authority is given for the assurance that any changes desired in the fundamental law of the land will be sought only by methods provided in the Constitution itself.

Her Majesty’s Ministers request all citizens to accept the assurances of Her Majesty in the same spirit in which it is given.

(SIGNED) Liliuokalani.

Samuel Parker,
Minister of Foreign Affairs.

W. H. Cornwell,
Minister of Finance.

John F. Colburn,
Minister of the Interior.

A. P. Peterson,
Attorney-General.

Iolani Palace, January 16, 1893.

In the afternoon all of the principal business houses closed up to allow the owners and their clerks to attend the mass meeting at the Armory. A full report of the enthusiastic meeting appears elsewhere in this issue.

After the meeting adjourned many people returned to Fort street, and stood around as if they expected some new developments, and they were rewarded when one of the most important events of the day happened.

About 5 o’clock in the afternoon, the U. S. S. Boston landed about three hundred men. Each man had two belts of cartridges around his waist and was armed with a rifle. The men marched up to the office of the Consul-General of the United States, where a halt was made.

The marines were detached and sent to the American Legation on Nuuanu Avenue, while the sailors marched out along Merchant street with two gatling guns and made a halt in front of Mr. J. A. Hopper’s residence. About sundown they moved to the grounds of Mr. J. B. Atherton’s and after a stay of several hours returned to Arion Hall, where they camped over night.

[The “Daily” here mention at the top refers to the Daily Pacific Commercial Advertiser.]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/24/1893, p. 6)

The U. S. S. Boston Lands Sailors and Marines.

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXVIII, Number 4, Page 6. January 24, 1893.