John Papa Ii goes on makaikai to Puuloa, 1865.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

A Visitation.—Last Thursday, the Hon. J. Ii and his daughters went on a tour of the many lochs of Pearl Harbor [ke Awa-lau o Puuloa], and the bathing waters of Kaahupahau, that shark,* Continue reading

Dissatisfaction with the new king, 1887.

The Native Hawaiian
HEARD FROM.

The Natives of Kaneohe Show Their Feeling Towards the Present Government.

Ua paneia e W. M. Kipikona na mea i hoikeike ia iho nei, e pili ana i ke aupuni e ku nei, o ka poe ma ke poo ke hilinai nei lakou ma o na haole la o ka aina, o na kamaaina hoi, aole o lakou hilinai iki i ka Moi a me kona mau Kuhina, i ko lakou hooponopono ana i ke aupuni. Ua ike ia ka hemahema o ko Kipikona mau alakai ana i ka manao o ka lehulehu, a e ike ia ka manao o na kamaaina o ka aina e like me na mea i kakauia malalo iho. (Ua kakauia keia ma ka olelo Hawaii e like me ka mea i ike maka ia a i lohe ia mai ka poe nona na inoa malalo iho o keia, a i kakau inoa ia e lakou me ka maopopo pono.)

Ua makemake makou i aupuni maemae, i aupuni e hooponopono noeau ia ana, a e malama ia ana na loaa a pau no kou homealoha, kou aina makuahine—”ua pau loa na alii oiaio ia Lunalilo i hala e aku nei.” O D. Kalakaua aole oia he Alii io; aole makou i noi i na Lunamakaainana e koho iaia; aole no hoi o makou makemake iaia, e like me na kahoaka i ike ia i kona la i koho ia ai. Continue reading

Honolulu Hale torn down to build a parking lot, 1917.

Historic Building  of ’30s to Be Razed Soon
Honolulu Hale Sold to Frank Godfrey for $10

Honolulu Hale, build about 1836 by Kamehameha III, which was sold today for $10.

Historic Honolulu Hale sold for $10 to one lone bidder Frank Godfrey, today at noon when King Kalakaua’s dinner bell called together a small group of spectators to witness the last event in the life of the building. Within 60 days the building will be torn down and the ground upon which it stands will be cleared of all traces of it, according tothe agreement which the purchaser signed after the auction. The auction was conducted by Elmer L. Schwarzberg of James F. Morgan Co. and in the curious crowd were a number of Honolulu’s kamaainas—old-timers. Continue reading

Birthday of William K. Kuwalu, 1949.

Kauai’s Oldest Resident Has 100th Birthday

(Photo on Page 13)

Special to The Advertiser

LIHUE, Kauai, Jan. 29—There’s something a little special about William K. Kuwalu’s birthday tonight because he will be 100 years old. Kuwalu, who can probably lay claim to being Kauai’s oldest resident, was born on Jan. 29, 1849, on the little island of Niihau.

* * *

THE LUAU IS TO be given at his Waimea Valley home by his sons and daughters. His daughters are Mrs. Emily Baclayon of Kilauea and Mrs. Helen Yadao of Mana.

The sons are Joseph N. Kuwalu, William K. Kuwalu Jr., and Abraham W. Kuwalu, all of Waimea. Continue reading

Musician Johnny Miner dies in El Paso, 1920.

That Hawaiian Dies of the Flu in El Paso, Texas, 1920.

This past Monday, a letter was received by the Star Bulletin newspaper from Dave Makuakane. This letter told that Johnny Miner died in El Paso Texas; the letter was written on the 24th of March past. Dave Makuakane also stated that they sent word to the family by telegraph, but they did not receive a reply, therefore Johnny Miner was buried in El Paso,  Texas. Continue reading

Queen Liliuokalani’s circuit around the island, 1891.

THE ROYAL TOUR.

Her Majesty the Queen was entertained at Makao, near Hauula, Koolauloa, on Saturday by Mr. Lane and other prominent Hawaiians of that locality. In the afternoon, the Queen went  out canoe riding, the canoe being drawn by a lively span of horses by means of ropes attached to the canoe.The horses were ridden at full gallop, the canoe skimming along the surface of the water at a lively rate. After the novel canoe ride Her Majesty and many others went out sea bathing. Continue reading

Leprosy patients protest against R. W. Wilcox, 1902.

LEPERS DENOUNCE WILCOX

Appeal to Voters to Elect Kuhio.

DECLARE DELEGATE NOT HAWAIIAN

Say His Act is Not That of a Friend of the People

Once more have the lepers at Kalaupapa spoken, and their voice is even stronger against Wilcox and his plans for their future than on the occasion of their resolutions which were laid before the Senatorial Commission.

The latest meeting of the lepers was held on Wednesday  last at Beretania Hall, at the settlement, and the gathering was a very large one. The speakers denounced the attempts of Wilcox to transfer them bodily to the Federal government for control, and as well they refused to listen to any explanations as to his meaning when he urges such transfer. The majority of the speakers predicted a landslide for Prince Kuhio and the Republican ticket. It was said that the lepers would now begin to lay before their friends all over the islands their fears for the future in the even of the reelection of Wilcox,and would also appeal to their people to prevent such a happening.

The resolutions which were adopted and which have been sent to prominent men on other islands as well as to Honolulu, are as follows:

An appeal to the Hawaiian people from the Leper Settlement at Kalaupapa,Molokai.

To the Hawaiian people in general; listen and consider the appeal of your unfortunates.

We, your unfortunate relatives and friends living in the Settlement where sorrow and woes abound,separated from you on account of the sickness that befell us, wish to appeal to you. You all know that the man we once trusted and in whom we put our faith, and whom we elected as our Delegate to Washington, has returned evil for good to us poor unfortunates, and to the people in general by introducing a bill in Congress which calls for the transferring of the care and maintenance of the Leper Settlement to the Federal government.

Such action by the Delegate without referring the matter to us, the unfortunate lepers, is one of the most dirty, cruel and low doings of a man toward his fellow men.

You must not think that by such giving over of our care to a stranger we would be benefited. Far from it. A stranger would not be painstaking, and moreover, have no love for the unfortunate Hawaiians, and if such a bill be passed our troubles and sorrows will be greater than we can bear.

We are willing to bear our own woes, sorrows and our heavily laden burdens cheerfully, if by so doing you will be saved, but has the intention of pitting sorrows upon sorrow any traces of love of the Delegate for us? Or is it true, then, that you also have followed the acts of the Delegate and have joined with him in heaping sorrow threefold upon us?

R. W. Wilcox stated before the Senatorial Commission “that the majority of the Hawaiian people have shown their willingness to give over our care to the Federal government.”

Is there any truth in this statement? Is it also ture that there are Hawaiians besides Wilcox who wish to put us in an oven of fire and to increase our sorrows a hundredfold? We will answer and say “no.”

Has the bond of love between husband and wife, father and children, family to family, fellowman to man, been put asunder? We think it has not, and right here we denounce Wilcox and say that he is not a true Hawaiian.

We have an old saying which goes: “See to your fellowman first, then to your dog.” It is not the same with Wilcox. He has given his aloha to a dog rather than to us.

We have sent a petition signed by 750…

(PCA, 10/20/1902,  p. 1)

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Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXXV, Number 6303, Page 1. October 20, 1902.

…names protesting against the bill, and we pray and appeal to you all to erase Wilcox’s name from your ballot as Delegate to Congress.

We the unfortunate lepers, residing in the Settlement, through our committee,

John S. Wilmington, John T. Unea, J. K. Waiamau, Charles M. Brewster, L. M. Painamu, J. C. Kiliia, J. K. Kainuwai, Moses Koahoa, H. K. Akanui, J. Kiaaina, J. D. Kahale, John Haulani, A. W. Bruns, Joel H. Mahoe, Achong Holuk, George Nakaokoo, W. K. Kalua, D. Kaialamni, Komi Naupo, J. Kiaipa, James Alenuihaha, Jaianui, Chalres K. Manua, A. M. Holopinai, Thomas K. Nathaniel, Silas Carter, James Prosser, P. Kiha, J. P. Miau, J. K. Kialoa, George J. Kanikau.

Kalaupapa, Molokai, October 16th, 1902.

(PCA, 10/20/1902, p. 4)

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Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXXV, Number 6303, Page 4. October 20, 1902.